32 fairytale homes Midcentury Staircase Design Photos

yamamar design
Berkeley Hills House
Ideabooks1,005
Questions2
Home sweet home
* renovated mid-century Berkeley home
“Home sweet home” — cecyalemtz
Webber + Studio, Architects
8 Reviews
Brady Lane Remodel Addition
Ideabooks556
Questions1
itself. But maybe that’s a good thing. “Hype has made it better,” Alter says. Events: Modern Home Tour Austin (held at the beginning of February); Barkitecture (October 19, 2014); AIA Austin’s 28th Annual Home Tour (date TBD)Travel Guide: Places to go and things to do in AustinMore: Explore more of Austin’s
“cool stair -- more substantial than a standard spiral but it is compact” — tbkreno
Arnold Ziffel
Architect - Jack Viks
Ideabooks311
Questions0
If your home's curve is too drastic to accommodate a salon-style gallery, work the area as its own large piece of art. A cost-effective way to do this is with a prefab wall mural. You can find an awesome, uber-affordable world map mural at Amazon.
“Cabinet above CT” — nmilesn
DE atelier Architects
5 Reviews
Lelean St Coastal Architecture
Ideabooks339
Questions0
i like how the staircase is somewhat hidden and not the focal point of the home
“Stairs” — marke8
Heliotrope Architects
1 Review
Madison Park
Ideabooks263
Questions1
bottom and top levels. What is that? Is it polished concrete? It looks like a thin layer at the top. We are hoping to do something similar in our new home.
“Bannister” — muybien99
Lisa Hallett Taylor
Stairway to Second-Level Main House
Ideabooks776
Questions0
nice verticals. want these in steel at my home
“Stairs to roof deck” — amandaperrone
John Maniscalco Architecture
2 Reviews
Sugar Bowl Residence
Ideabooks16,274
Questions6
The modern feel to this beautiful home
“Beautiful lights but wow expensive” — iwannadream
Regan Baker Design
6 Reviews
Noe Valley Rustic Industrial Modern
Ideabooks386
Questions1
A re-creation of a 1950’s home in SF, is now family friendly and perfect for entertaining. A closed floor plan was opened to maximize the beautiful downtown bay view. Photography: Photo Designs by Odessa
Architect Miller worked to maximize the home's natural light. Like most homes in close-knit San Francisco neighborhoods, this one shares two walls with adjoining houses. Getting enough natural light in was definitely a concern, as the north and south walls are the only ones with windows. To solve this
this, Miller knocked out many of the home's interior walls to open up the space and put a large skylight in the center of the home.
“Wood color” — jillandpaal
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