6,172 Toilets

As an integral part of any full or half bath, a well-functioning, practical toilet is a key consideration during your bathroom remodel. Even though it might seem like a one-size-fits-all purchase, there are many different heights, finishes and designs to choose from, as well as many placement choices to consider. As you decide between a one-piece and two-piece unit, or maybe think about adding a bidet toilet, here are some things to consider. More 
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What size toilet works for my bathroom?


Measure the rough-in distance: the distance from the wall behind the bowl to the center of the floor drain. Use this measurement to determine the size of your new toilet — it must fit into the space between the drainpipe and the wall to work in your space. If you don't have much room to spare, wall-mounted units are great because they eliminate the need for a foot or base. If you can't afford this expensive upgrade, buy a corner unit or one with a round bowl; elongated and oval-shaped bowls take up more space, though they do tend to be more comfortable.

Should you buy one-piece or two-piece toilets?


One-piece units are one complete piece that are easier to clean and won’t leak between the bowl and the tank. They’re sleek and stylish and save space, but they’re generally more expensive than two-piece units, which come with a separate tank and bowl. Be sure you purchase all the necessary parts with the two-piece water closet, as the seat is not usually included with the bowl.

What toilet height should you choose?


When making this decision, consider the needs of your family. Standard height is 14 to 15 inches, but the 16- to 17-inch models may be more comfortable for you. Higher units are also more accessible for physically challenged individuals. On the other hand, shorter units work well in a child's bathroom, especially while potty training.

What other features should you look for?


As you consider new water closets, try to get something that is energy efficient; it will use less water, which will in turn lower your monthly bill. Although less important, also consider the overall design. The unit's cut and color can make it skew more toward modern or traditional, especially when paired with a similar style sink or tub. And for those looking for some European flair, consider a bidet.
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