2,686 nursery Traditional Landscape Design Photos

Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design LLC
10 Reviews
Front Ridge Residence
Ideabooks890
Questions1
That's why it's a good idea to buy plants at the nursery every month, so you can evaluate which areas of your garden need more interest in each season and coordinate the perfect show."
green texture closer to the ground for months. Do your homework when creating a plant plan. It's as easy as reading the tags on the plants at the nursery.
a plant plan. It's as easy as reading the tags on the plants at the nursery. See the rest of this property
Buy June-blooming plants now, so you can select the exact colors and varieties you prefer. Visiting plants in the nursery is one of the easiest ways of seeing the subtle differences between
prefer," writes landscape designer Genevieve Schmidt. "Visiting plants in the nursery is one of the easiest ways of seeing the subtle differences between each plant. That's why it's a good idea to buy plants at the nursery every month, so you can evaluate which areas of your garden need more interest
“Love the purples and dusty pinks” — leannep61
Le jardinet
Filoli
Ideabooks620
Questions0
still create this looks even if you did not remember to plant tulip bulbs in fall. Nurseries and garden centers are well stocked in spring with pots of blooming bulbs. In many instances you can simply drop the nursery container into something more decorative at home, adding moss to disguise the top.
still create this looks even if you did not remember to plant tulip bulbs in fall. Nurseries and garden centers are well stocked in spring with pots of blooming bulbs. In many instances you can simply drop the nursery container into something more decorative at home, adding moss to disguise the top.
“I Love this!!” — Portia McSwain
Le jardinet
High performance, low maintenance annuals
Ideabooks633
Questions1
Bonfire Begonia This sun-tolerant begonia is so reliable that I buy a dozen at a time when I see it appear in nurseries. I use these trailing annuals in hanging baskets or at the edges of containers, where they not only tolerate full sun but thrive in it. Bonfire begonia
3. Bonfire Begonia This sun-tolerant begonia is so reliable that I buy a dozen at a time when I see it appear in nurseries. I use these trailing annuals in hanging baskets or at the edges of containers, where they not only tolerate full sun but thrive in it. Bonfire begonia
Bonfire Begonia This sun-tolerant begonia is so reliable that I buy a dozen at a time when I see it appear in nurseries. I use these trailing annuals in hanging baskets or at the edges of containers, where they not only tolerate full sun but thrive in it. Bonfire begonia
“Bonfire begonia” — donnatu
J. Peterson Garden Design
Gardens
Ideabooks689
Questions0
wall and enjoy the view. Benefits and tolerances: Tolerant of both heat and cold; can be grown in the ground or in containers When to plant: Plant nursery pots in fall or spring.
garden wall and enjoy the view.Benefits and tolerances: Tolerant of both heat and cold; can be grown in the ground or in containersWhen to plant: Plant nursery pots in fall or spring.See how to grow crossvine
“Great for climbing” — jlachasse
Amy Martin Landscape Design
4 Reviews
Matisse Garden Pond Walkway
Ideabooks6,335
Questions5
cultivar is ‘Wiltonii’ (also called ‘Blue Rug’), which grows only 4 to 6 inches tall. Found on Vinalhaven island in Maine and introduced by South Wilton Nurseries in Connecticut, this form is salt and wind tolerant and has blue needles that turn purple in winter.
cultivar is ‘Wiltonii’ (also called ‘Blue Rug’), which grows only 4 to 6 inches tall. Found on Vinalhaven island in Maine and introduced by South Wilton Nurseries in Connecticut, this form is salt and wind tolerant and has blue needles that turn purple in winter.
“Landscaping” — vsrekowski
Milieu Design
11 Reviews
Milieu Design
Ideabooks3,808
Questions3
but can’t figure out why? Take some brutally honest photographs. These aren't the ones to share with the world on Facebook, but can be taken to a nursery professional for advice. It may be that some plants need thinning, or there isn't sufficient foliage interest to hold the vignette together throughout
“Love the flowers” — lanashap
Michelle
Frenchflair
Ideabooks5,021
Questions3
blue flowers, you'll want to achieve a pH of 4.5 to 5.5. For pink flowers, you want a pH of 7.0 to 7.5. Use an inexpensive soil pH test kit from the nursery or hardware store to test the pH of the soil around the plant's roots. Lower the soil pH by adding sulphur or aluminum sulfate (making the soil more
“Blue hydrangea” — iadderley
Land Design, Inc.
Fenced Garden
Ideabooks14,910
Questions3
trees. Prune and spray deciduous fruit trees, such as apple, peach, apricot and pear. Check on the how-to with expert books or advisers at your local nursery.Plant summer-blooming bulbs. In a month filled with daffodils, think about planting bulbs to bloom in late spring and summer: tuberous begonias, gladiolus
“Would love to grow our own vegetables and herbs” — jenloz
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™