Linda


Business Description
Location:
Elgin, IL US 
Contact:
Linda Hawkins 
Type:
 
Address:
Elgin, IL 60123 
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bungalowmo
I LOVE the combination of a slatted blind & a curtain!
Hard to get a good shot, but this is my kitchen door. The curtains are lace with little bumble bees on them!

Seriously....this site is a PITA for photos. SMALL kb size....still posts them sideways. A PREVIEW function would be so nice!
Yesterday at 10:03AM   
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Linda
I vote for no curtain. I have a very simple cloth valance in my breakfast room; adds a bit of interest. I used some upholstery fabric from my stash, then stapled it onto a wood board. I put three nails in the top of the trim with corresponding holes in the valance board...installs and removes in 30 seconds...toughest part is pulling the chair over so I can reach it.

When I do this again, I will put the holes in the trim and put the pegs in the valance to make it even easier. When I started the project, I didn't know if I would like the look of a valance so wanted to install it in such a way that I could remove it without having any holes to fill.
Yesterday at 10:15AM     
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Linda
I would open up the courtyard by getting rid of the fence and shrubs, unless you need to use the courtyard for containing a dog.

If you replace the walkway, I would consider a staggered geometric design and split the courtyard unevenly. Depending on your neighborhood and how your backyard is set up, I would want a seating area of some sort in the front. You could do a narrow trellis at one edge of the courtyard and tuck a bench or chair behind it for shade/privacy or have an open area with chairs or cafe table for chats with the neighbors. Use some interesting angles to play up the modern look
Yesterday at 10:07AM   
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Angel18432
Actually the fence might be nice if we could see it. Also, get rid of the little shutters each side of window.
23 hours ago   
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Grown Solutions
I would take out the shrubs and the fence behind it to open up the courtyard area. Then for the bare walls I would install some hanging garden trellises from grownsolutions.com
1 hour ago   
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Linda
How about the 2 inch wood blinds with the synthetic finish that attracts dust like crazy...takes quite a while to wipe them down and by the next day, you can already see dust on them. Every other surface can be spotless (happens occasionally in this house!) and they will look dusty.
Yesterday at 9:56AM   
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n247080
My parrot room. It's soiled the instant I wipe it down.
36 minutes ago   
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sstarr
Wondering why Houzz wants to know..... but now they do know about parrot rooms.
28 minutes ago   
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claireed11
composting is not a requirement, nor is recycling- but Vermont (USA) is known for being ahead of the trend for "green" living. Many people recycle- but not so many compost. Until this becomes a community supported effort, I don't see that it will impact city dwellers. There are proposals in place that would require everyone in Vermont to recycle- and I wholeheartedly support that. Since I started recycling and composting, I find that I have about one bag of garbage per week. I just wish that companies would change to compostable packaging. I am changing my buying patterns to include whether or not the packaging can be recycled- but I wish it were easier to find compostable packaging as well.
4 hours ago     
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karelina
claireed11: I agree with you completely! Recycling needs to be community supported to eliminate or at least cut down on what goes to a dump site. Long-term, these sites threaten our ground water and take up valuable land for garbage. What a waste!
37 minutes ago   
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: Bathroom ideas
   Comment   last Friday
Linda added 3 photos to ideabook: Bathroom ideas
   Comment   last Friday
Linda likes a comment on an ideabook

7 Tile Tips for Baths on a Budget

How to Add Style to Your Bathroom Without Breaking the Budget Full Story
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John Whipple - By Any Design ltd.
You can use Child Labour for steps like drywall. This little girl worked all day for the promise of a piece of cake!
last Friday at 6:23AM     
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Linda likes 2 comments on an ideabook

Contractor Tips: Top 10 Home Remodeling Don'ts

Help your home renovation go smoothly and stay on budget with this wise advice from a pro Full Story
     Comment   last Friday
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Jennifer Slusher
Regarding #6 and #7, I try to be the mind that a business relationship is like a 'real' relationship - it's a two way street. Just as we (the consumer) expect perfect customer service, to be treated like we're your only customer, that my $100 job is just as important as that guy's $100000 job, etc., I think the consumer needs to treat the business person with the same respect. We're all people, regardless of our title or position in the relationship.

While we want the contractors to consider our house and our family, we should respect them by treating them like people. Years ago, I worked for a woman and her husband who hired a contractor to do work on their gorgeous 1850's era home. The couple had big $$$ and were spending a chunk of change on the renovation. The contractor ended up cancelling the contract one month in because no less than four guys walked off the job for the nasty way the woman was treating the workers (trust me, her own employees weren't safe either). Yes, it's your money and you definitely shouldn't accept what you don't want or be overcharged... but there's a way to be firm, get the point across that you're not a pushover AND still be nice and considerate.

Pets and children should never be in a construction work site. It's not an issue of this being your home or their workspace, it's a safety thing for both parties. Contractors don't want your child or pet being injured on the site any less then you don't.
last Friday at 10:44AM     
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Insignia Kitchen and Bath Design Studio
Thank you Jennifer Slusher for these comments - they are spot on!
last Friday at 10:57AM     
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polarity
I was going down the list thinking "I'm not feeling any of these... wait. That chandelier! Shut up and take my money. :)"
August 24, 2014 at 1:28AM   
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erinlecompte
They're all gorgeous!
August 24, 2014 at 4:47AM   
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leelee
Here's a word we don't get to use often--ostentatious.
August 23, 2014 at 6:28PM        Thanked by Fratantoni Lifestyles
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bungalowmo
Love the wood floor....hate the tile floor
Those 2 fake columns are funky.

Overall...not feeling the love here.

haha....leelee....just used that in another foyer comment!
last Wednesday at 5:57PM   
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bungalowmo
charlee....celery...robin...I'm with ya!!

Things were going pretty good...then this Summer, my sweet little 5yo weeping willow died from a fungus. Now my back yard is going to be even barer!

1st pic is when she was newly planted.
2nd is when she was 2 or so years old
3rd is my "lovely" patio!

So since I have to have my willow ripped out....backyard is back to dull!
last Wednesday at 5:07PM   
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Linda
My backyard is more like a park...like the ones in cities where the budget cuts have nearly stopped any work other than occasional mowing. It's been several years since we had any trees trimmed and my back yard is completely shaded by the absolutely monstrous sycamore tree and the locust tree which is almost as big. Even my hostas are wondering where the sun went!
last Wednesday at 6:06PM   
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Imondi Interiors
Actually, I was working at the clients house installing some Plaster, and the handyman painted the red shiny doors per request of the homeowner. After a writer from Houzz posted an article on the beauty of black doors, I thought what a perfect color for the doors over the red. The red was almost an eyesore to me. (Thats just my thought). Everyone loved the Black over the red. Much softer!! Their son is off at college, so he hasn't even seen it. Im sure he will like it.
August 24, 2014 at 12:02PM     
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LB Interiors
Much nicer!
August 24, 2014 at 12:06PM      Thanked by Imondi Interiors
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Cleveland Designs
Do Not play around with any idea other than calling in the professional's and having it removed, check for other places in your home that might have it. I know it is expensive, but so is Cancer, not worth your life or that of your loved ones. ..........Your renovation can wait, and when you do it, you won't have to worry about asbestos. If you watch HGTV, they deal with it ASAP always.........
last Friday at 7:30AM   
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luckylyn5
We don't know for sure if we have asbestos (or lead paint) in our house (built in 1949), but when we remodeled our kitchen and master bath last year (which included wall removal), we hired a general contractor who was also asbestos and lead paint certified.

He treated the demo work under the assumption that there WAS asbestos and/or lead paint, and therefore took the necessary precautions when removing walls, etc. This was included in his bid in the "demo" section.

Most homes "of a certain age" have asbestos. Even if you don't know for sure you have asbestos, it's better to be safe than sorry and assume the worst at the beginning (rather than find yourself with a big $ addition to budget once demo starts if asbestos is found once demo begins).
last Saturday at 8:00AM   
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Linda commented on an ideabook

Autumn Joy: How to Get 3 Months of Fall Flowers

Enjoy blooms from September to November by mixing 6 asters native to different areas of the U.S. Full Story
     Comment   last Tuesday
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Linda
I love the blooms but I get so tired of pulling up the little seedlings. My garden is to the point that gardening now seems to be more about yanking seedlings than planting anything new.

These photos were taken last fall...not quite that far along yet this year
last Tuesday at 10:18PM     
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Trilliums Landscaping & Horticulture
Benjamin, do you consider big leaf aster or white woodland aster to be native to your region? do you grow them in your garden? I sometimes questions myself on what I should consider "native plants", do I limit them to plants growing within 50 miles, 100 miles, 200 miles or more, do I include plants that show up in the recent fossil record or have been recorded in the past, but don't currently grow in my area, should I grow plants that aren't native yet but will be better adapted as the climate changes? Please let me know your take on "what is a native plant".
last Saturday at 9:28AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Trilliums -- let's talk about climate change: native plants could not be better adapted to it! They are used to the local and regional climate, boom / bust cycles of temp and rain, esp when properly sited. I don't subscribe to the theory that we know better then evolutionary nature in any shape or form, and the talk about "better adapted plants" too often means exotics we know nothing about (how they will interact not just in the near future, but the far future). We spread plants willy nilly for "beauty" over ecosystem services, when it should at least be a 50/50 proposition. That's my rant there.

I generally think we should try to grow plants as native to our locale as possible -- sometimes that means a 10 mile radius, sometimes 50, sometimes 200. If you live in Wyoming your radius will likely be larger, whereas if you are in northern California or southern Florida it might be a lot smaller (more niche ecosystems, you know, of course I'm grossly generalizing here). I grow both of those asters, but I probably would not use them in a new garden because there are plenty of local asters to choose from. What's native? Drive to a wildlife preserve or restoration and look. Or an old cemetery. I do so enjoy the facetious argument that, well, gingko trees once grew here so is that native? Or, shouldn't we just consider hosta native because it's planted everywhere?
last Saturday at 9:37AM     
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windingcreek_creations
Woodjay, no it's not true. I have found that when a husband doesn't want to do the work, he becomes very good at finding practical reasons for not doing it. :) Most people in the North do have double hung windows, but infloor heating is not common. I personally hate it (we staying in a place that had it, and our feet were always sweaty, the dogs were always too hot. and the downstairs was always compensating for the cooler temps in the upstairs bedrooms. Saying all that, the best way to get something done is to simply do it yourself. They either shrug and pitch in, or they grumble and walk away. Either way, you get your hardwood floors.
last Saturday at 7:07AM   
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windingcreek_creations
Tile is SO hard to maintain on a floor. It chips and the grout is a bear to keep clean. I used to paint my old cement tile in the bathroom once a year. The trick was to wipe off the surface so only the grout and pores were affected. A messy process, but so much easier than trying to scrub grout lines.
last Saturday at 7:13AM   
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Linda
Trim down the bushes or replace if necessary so you can see the entire windows in the front of your house.

I agree with the suggestion for aubergine, although my first idea would have been a bit towards reds, perhaps a dark cranberry color.

Using a color visualizer program is a great suggestion and certainly the easiest "paint" you will ever apply. Most of the paint companies have a program on their web site and it's an excellent way to experiment with colors.
August 24, 2014 at 6:14PM      Thanked by sebastianthecat
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Elizabeth
I would remove all of the shrubs. They are too big and close off the front of the house. I would put in some smaller shrubs and perennials. I think this would immediately make your entrance more welcoming and attractive. Maybe look at some pictures of houses similar to yours and you will find a color for your door that you like.
last Tuesday at 11:40PM      Thanked by sebastianthecat
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yankeenh
To me, it's the shade of orange that may be the issue--from a distance it looks very similar to some shades of natural wood, but without the richness and depth wood has.

Lots of good suggestions--I particularly like the aubergine color idea and black window trim in place of dark green.
Yesterday at 8:55AM   
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sstarr
I vote for one large bathroom with enclosed, possibly entirely separate, toilet area. Most of the time, the guests won't be there.
August 24, 2014 at 10:59AM     
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bungalowmo
1 large nice bath.
last Wednesday at 5:39PM   
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makaloco
I had a system installed after someone tried to break in one day when I was out. My dog was a puppy at the time. Now that he's big, he sets off false alarms with the "petproof" motion sensors so I had to have them disabled. But the doors are still wired, and I have the all-important sign!
last Wednesday at 6:16PM   
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Margo
Leaving the leg lamp on display seems to be quite an effective deterent;)

last Wednesday at 6:28PM     
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bungalowmo
Thanks! She has a friend on my mantle...
The one above is called "woman's head" and below "Testa Di Giovinetta".

Took almost 7 years off & on, looking for just the right pieces for my living room.
August 24, 2014 at 5:33PM   
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vp82254
Yuck!
August 24, 2014 at 5:33PM   
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hayleydaniels
RVCW, no he's pretty good about that, but he does snore like a freight train so I get up and sleep on the couch when that happens.
last Saturday at 10:07AM     
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Cathy Henderson
I always sleep on the side close to the window, like air.
4 hours ago   
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Kevin Ruedisueli, Inc
Back on windows again: I have been in design and construction long enough (nearly 40 years) to have seen new windows fail and need replacement. The best of them seem to come with a 20-year warranty. Many of them fail in less than 20 years. There are more opportunities for failure in modern window systems as well. The seals are usually rubber or plastic and can harden, crack, and fall off. Then there's the insulated glass: the edge seals can and do fail causing the glass to fog. I have even seen mold growing between the layers. Then, if they were made of wood, you can almost bet the wood will rot in 20 years or even as few as five or ten. Of course few people buy wood windows now and smart manufacturers are working hard on the rot problem too. A lot of people like vinyl--not a very sustainable material, nor is it near as sturdy as fiberglass, or aluminum, both better choices in my view if you must replace windows. So there's no such thing as no maintenance when it comes to windows. They will need it. If you have decent old windows, and you have time to perform the deferred maintenance they may need, do it. Don't rip them out.
August 7, 2014 at 1:23PM     
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maryloufadden
My husband and I lived in a carpenter gothic home for 30 years, lovely restored everything, a lot our selves to save money, the blood, sweat and tears as they say,OMG the work and money, but It was truly beautiful. The constant upkeep of one of these homes and trying to get people who know what they are doing in restoration was a challenge, yes indeed one has to have patience We raised our family there and had a wonderful life. The time came to downsize. Built a beautiful ranch style home with lots of character, a courtyard, usage of stone, for pillars,fireplace, Open concept all one level, easy living as I say. Older homes are for the young with passion , money and lots of energy, I say to my husband I still love looking at these old beauties, but never never want to own one again!!
August 13, 2014 at 1:28PM     
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katiewms
We had to sell our dream home because of a move and a new job opportunity 2 years ago. A large 1927 coastal home in St Pete FL. I wanted to take my last breath in that house. ..but alas we now have a home built 70 years later. The thing I told the couple that bought our home at our open house was this. As beautiful as historic homes are, they are antiques and require patience. Before we touched a major thing in our home we lived in it...we got to know it, historic homes were built with purpose, built to last and age to be even stronger nearly a hundred years later. The wood hardens and becomes nearly impenetrable to pests. (At least cedar) the houses were not meant to be air tight...they were meant to breath long before A.C. was around. Before you tackle morphing an old beauty into a modern day show girl, save your self pain and grief of a botched job and get to know just why and why houses were built to last a hundred years or more...then carefully work around that;)
August 14, 2014 at 7:51PM     
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Revolutionary Gardens
what should you know? The # of times you refer to yourself as an idiot for buying this dump is inversely proportional to the amount of money you have to do anything about it.
August 23, 2014 at 8:36AM     
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Ironwood Builders
One thing I learned going my own industrial style office is that most of the pieces available are at least somewhat custom. Factories didn't have vanities or even bath cabinetry. They have and had big utilitarian porcelain on cast iron sinks and rough cast chrome plated faucets. If those don't work...and a vanity definitely won't in a commercial setting because of the ADA compliance required...look at Etsy maybe? The industrial style is hard to get right. Plenty of "industrial" stuff available just looks new to me. I get it that you are tired and need this to be done and over....I took the bathroom in my place (unfinished after a year) rustic with large format slate tile walls, ground concrete floors, an old metal medical cabinet to store cleaning supplies and back stock of paper goods...and readily available ADA compliant plumbing fixtures. I did do some cool Crouse and Hinds explosion proof light fixtures...rewired them for LED bulbs myself.
August 19, 2014 at 9:46PM     
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quercus2
None of the above. I vote for covered cans that slide into a cabinet. This gives the hidden look of tucked-away cans and the cleanliness of cans with covers. You won't have to constantly clean all sides of the inside cabinet if a little care is taken not to splatter all over the place when putting trash in the cans.
August 15, 2014 at 12:20PM     
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J&E Kitchens and Cabinets
I actually use a better system than that showed on these photos with lids and cover when closed...
August 15, 2014 at 12:34PM     
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31 True Tales of Remodeling Gone Wild

Drugs, sex, excess — the home design industry is rife with stories that will blow your mind, or at least leave you scratching your head Full Story
     Comment   August 19, 2014
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marvinone
I feel so wonderfully normal now! Thanks for this fun article.
August 18, 2014 at 12:19PM     
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Linda added 2 photos to ideabook: Bathroom ideas
   Comment   August 18, 2014
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LeMaster Architects
Have you considered fiber cement siding/shingles in lieu of vinyl? CertainTeed makes those as well.
August 22, 2014 at 6:04PM      Thanked by new_homeowner
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kylen2350
NO VINYL please. If anything think about HardieBoard. My former family home has asbestos shingles. It is 97 yrs old and was shingled back in the 60's. Painted white since then and looks great.
August 23, 2014 at 6:03PM      Thanked by new_homeowner
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14 Things You Need to Start Doing Now for Your Spouse’s Sake

You have no idea how annoying your habits at home can be. We’re here to tell you Full Story
     Comment   August 18, 2014
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detailaddict
I was deliberately guilty of leaving lights/the TV, etc. on for the first year or so of our marriage; not that my husband made a fuss over it but out of rebellion against all the nagging I got from my dad growing up. Never mind that I was only leaving the room for a sec - "Turn that light off!!" Well now that I was married and moved out, this was MY house; so if wasting a little money only served to de-throne it a little more, then so be it. I've grown up a little since, but the attempt to instill good habits in kids can have the opposite effect, depending on the approach.
August 18, 2014 at 6:22PM     
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Lindsay
This summer has seen its share of bidding wars in Denver. We have been looking for a rental with a very specific check list and nearly all of ten properties we've looked at was completely booked with showings every fifteen minutes on day one. Most of the time we'd be in the house with other potential buyers. The strange part is, at the peak of all this about a month ago, the market had what would normally be a glut of properties in that range. It seems nearly everything that sold this summer in Denver had multiple same day offers and went for above asking. We put one offer on a place we were really excited about (there were seven total offers)- we waived inspection, cash offer, $1k over highest bid up to x- and lost it by $1k. It went for 10% over asking.
August 18, 2014 at 6:30PM        Thanked by Emily Hurley
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bungalowmo
Nope. I'm in the only house I have personally ever owned. I knew I wanted it really bad! I went to the courthouse & found the sellers deed info. I knew how long he'd had it & what he paid. His asking price was about 70k over what he paid.

I offered 30k below his asking price & he accepted. He also agreed to pay closing costs, pay for the electrical upgrades & have the roof scraped, primed & repainted.

A little homework goes a LONG way!! :0)
August 19, 2014 at 9:36AM        Thanked by Emily Hurley
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grobby
Summer for me. Even though, winters are somewhat mild in my area, I can hardly wait for Spring and Summer.
August 13, 2014 at 7:38PM   
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ChickieD
Summer summer summer summer summer summer summer...probably cause I grew up in Alabama!
August 14, 2014 at 10:03AM   
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kiffkat
We have a main floor family room and a finished basement. Our first home had a living room & family room on the main floor. When we moved, we decided we did not want another formal living room again because we NEVER used it...NEVER, EVER, EVER. (I'm sounding like Taylor Swift)
August 23, 2014 at 1:01PM        Thanked by Steven Corley Randel, Architect
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andj32
Great Room, Hearth Room, Loft, Basement Rec Room, Media Room, and Screened Porch are all of our "Living" rooms.
August 23, 2014 at 4:01PM      Thanked by Steven Corley Randel, Architect
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Linda commented on an ideabook

Tips for Winning a Bidding War in a Hot Home Market

Cash isn’t always king in a bidding war. Get the home you want without blowing your budget, using these Realtor-tested strategies Full Story
     Comment   August 13, 2014
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Linda
List price is only the seller's guess as to how much someone else will be pay for the house. True market value is the price a willing buyer pays a willing seller, not what some agent or appraiser thinks. I believe that an auction is the easiest way to determine market value and I have no issues with going back to each participant in a bidding war with a new higher price.

From a buyer's standpoint, participating in a bidding war is all about being a member of the group of people who find that property desirable. There should be a certain comfort in knowing that other people are also interested. The time to worry about paying too much for a house is for the property that only gets one bid
August 13, 2014 at 6:21AM     
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sherrytem
I live in Marin and the market is insane. Too much like the pre 2008 market. We lucked out as we bought a new home at the bottom of the market about two and a half years ago. Makes my day when I get an e-mail from Zillow telling me my house has doubled in value. Makes all of the remodeling angst worth it. Just spent the afternoon painting the guest room. Always get ideas from Houzz and I enjoy the comments.
August 21, 2014 at 8:31PM     
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amvanman
Yeah, when we moved to Marin we were coming from Vancouver B.C. which is one of the most expensive real estate markets in N. America. Other than holding it's breath for a brief second when the U.S. collapse happened, prices never fell in Vancouver and just kept soaring. When we moved to Marin the market was at the bottom and we'd look at houses and the owners would beg us to tell them what they had to do to get us to buy their house. The owner of our house lost almost 700k. We were like kids in a candy store. Now it's like Vancouver. A house one street over, similar in style and condition just went for over $1300.00 a square foot. We paid $478.00 a square foot three years ago. Of course if we sold it wouldn't matter because we'd have to move down to see any of that as profit and when you're used to living in some of the most politically and socially progressive as well as most beautiful areas in the world, the acceptable choices become few. Expensive real estate markets are pricey for a reason and it's usually because they have a uniqueness few other places can match.
August 25, 2014 at 9:48AM   
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Linda
Yikes! Definitely not right but certainly not a unique solution unfortunately. One of the most awkward installations I have seen recently was encountered on a historic homes tour. The owners had prefinished hardwood installed on top of existing flooring in the upper level of a two story house with an open stairway. Because they didn't want to disturb the staircase and the upper level railing, they stopped short of the edge by about 3 inches. Then, to avoid the abrupt transition, they cut the front corner off the flooring to create an angled strip from original height up to the new floor level. So, you couldn't even put your foot flat on the floor at the top of the stairs. Silly looking, awkward to walk on and very dangerous. Sometimes the best approach is to bite the bullet and do the project correctly from the start or just leave well enough alone.

I did a complete gut job on an older house a few years ago...almost everything was redone, except for the stairs. I wouldn't even consider messing with a reasonably decent staircase. We had a lot of labor into refinishing the stairs and replacing missing stair returns but they finished product was probably the best feature of the house.

Except for prefinished parts, building or redoing wood stairs requires both a finish carpenter AND a floor guy. Many finish carpenters are not going to have the expertise in finish selection, surface prep and surface finishes that you would expect in a flooring guy.

In my experience, the people who know the most are often the ones who don't consider themselves an expert. The deeper you get into any subject, the more you realize what you don't know. The best guy to find is the one that considers himself "talented" or "competent" but others describe as an expert.
August 10, 2014 at 9:14PM        Thanked by pattigaff
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Cusano Construction Company Inc.
Thats horrible and should be flush. That is one reason I do not recommend using flooring products on stairs, you never know what your getting. True, the installer should have padded the treads to compensate or planned bottom of nosing , but I strongly recommend using pre-finished (1-piece) stair treads.
August 13, 2014 at 2:55AM   
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Select Hardwood Floor Co.
@panamabound...
No you wouldn't... doesn't work that way.
The "trim" offered for these purposes is an "L" shaped piece... sometimes wood, sometimes wrapped in vinyl... regardless, if you "plane" the top off, there's nothing left but a flat front...
These "approaches" are sold as an alternative to knowing how to do it right.
It's bad enough that a DIY'er would take that route... but someone who proclaims themselves a professional... uh-uh!
August 13, 2014 at 6:02AM     
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bungalowmo
You're right Dan...they used to build the nice big screened sleeping porches.

They also used to build nice big front porches too...now you're greeted by a big garage.

Go figure.

In first pic...the only shade available is coming from the actual structure. Not very ZEN to me...

Which makes you feel more welcome?
August 10, 2014 at 3:37PM     
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Linda
After living in a house with radiant heat, I consider forced air a step backwards.

You can change out the boiler without changing the radiators
August 10, 2014 at 8:24PM     
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lucindalane
Wow, what an unusual configuration. So glad to see someone else loving their new "old" home. Making it yours is really the greatest feeling.
August 10, 2014 at 8:45PM     
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bungalowmo
The only thing better than hot water radiant heat...steam! Now that was amazing! Great for plants, skin, sinuses...forced air...as soon as it shuts off you feel chilly again. Even when your boiler shuts off, the radiators remain super hot for hours.

Extremely efficient! I lay wet towels across them sometimes to get steam. Any port in the storm baby! :0)
August 11, 2014 at 9:22AM   
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Linda
A quality installation will look good regardless of the layout. How much extra will it cost to have the tile set on point? (extra material plus additional labor charges, if any)

Anytime the layout itself is a design element, the installation (workmanship plus substrate) must be up to appropriate quality standards. I work mainly in 50-100 year old homes and see lots of things that are out of square, not level, corners that don't meet evenly, small (or not so smal!) differences where materials meet, etc. Before you choose to set your tile diagonally, I would do some measurements and make sure you won't be highlighting a "feature" of your house that you would prefer to remain hidden.
August 10, 2014 at 2:49PM   
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DS Tile And Marble
I think diagonal will look great in this area
August 10, 2014 at 4:25PM   
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Linda
Check out the effect on property taxes. In some locales, an attached garage is taxed as part of the house so much more expensive than a detached building. Another factor you may wish to consider is insurance cost and coverage.

If you live on a farm, you are probably going to be outside in all sorts of weather regardless of whether the garage is attached or detached. I would be more likely to vote for an attached garage for a normal property in a town, but with unlimited space available, I would probably go with a detached space.
August 10, 2014 at 12:46AM        Thanked by maggieyork
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rocketjcat
Rjbracket, rather judgmental? What difference does it make how many cars we have...we can only drive one at a time.
August 16, 2014 at 5:04PM     
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MahtaMouse
Rjbracket... it's an unfortunate fact of life that often families have to have 3 cars... dad to get to work, mom to go to work and/or run household errands + run kids to doctor/dentist, etc, and 1 for the teenager(s) to get to school, work, school functions, date, etc. Unless ofcourse you enjoy being the family on call 24 hour chauffeur, which I'm guessing falls on your wife. This BTW, comes from a former 1 car family wife and mother.
August 17, 2014 at 11:59AM     
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Linda
Are you sure that underneath floor is oak? The picture isn't clear enough to distinguish the grain pattern. Is that flooring the subfloor or is the flooring you removed a more recent addition of wood on top of the original wood floor?
August 6, 2014 at 6:02PM      Thanked by Charles Brodeur
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Maria Pifke for Ethan Allen Inc. Schaumburg
Freshen up the color but a beautiful rug would be perfect to start
August 15, 2014 at 2:35PM     
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winkrock
Keep the brick & put in new hardwood floors. Pecan would be nice with the brick...,
August 18, 2014 at 9:45PM     
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bungalowmo
Being over 50...and everything hurts...I need something with some meat & support.
It needs to have a shallow seat pan...strong back and arms (because I don't!) and sit fairly low. At 5'0", I need a chair that truly fits ME....not a 6'3 guy.

I think the closest match would be that Stickley chair that feeney posted.
August 6, 2014 at 9:48AM     
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Linda
Issues from my current house

Dueling doorknobs - In my back hallway, the door to the backyard and the door to the basement both open into the same corner. Inevitably, it seems I'm much more likely to catch the doorknobs on each other when I'm holding a basket of wet clothes for the line.

The pantry is in that same unheated back hallway...not normally a problem except the pantry doorknob clashes with the kitchen doorknob so the kitchen door must be wide open to access the pantry. After my screwed up back hallway, my other pet peeve is no closets on the main floor other than the small pantry.

The rest of the house is very well designed...I wonder if the architect assigned his intern or draftsman to do that back hallway.
August 6, 2014 at 5:44PM     
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hayleydaniels
linda907, great points!
August 14, 2014 at 11:12AM     
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Jean Stryker
Garages are only as ugly as the doors on them. They can be as pretty as the rest of the house.
August 14, 2014 at 6:46PM     
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makaloco
Vertical lined rainbow, because I love colors.
June 15, 2014 at 9:02PM     
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Angelina Vick
It's looking like 3 versions are fairly tight in competition and there is a clear last place. Again, thanks for the information. It's helping formulate the next approach to the series.
June 18, 2014 at 8:57PM   
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