Linda


Business Description
Location:
Elgin, IL US 
Contact:
Linda Hawkins 
Type:
 
Address
Elgin, Illinois,
United States, 60123 
Linda added 29 photos to ideabook: woodard kitchen
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: staircase details
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Linda added 2 photos to ideabook: outdoor ideas
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: lindylou's ideas
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Al Fortunato Furnituremaker
When you get your stain samples, make sure the finish is also applied. The finish changes the final color and look.
on Sunday at 9:36am     
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Linda
Remove if at all possible without total destruction of the surface

If you must leave it, be sure to prime with oil based primer before continuing
on Sunday at 11:24am   
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lellogirl
I painted over wallpaper in a long and narrow closet once. It was fine, because there were no seams. I don't think I'd do that in a room.
I have stripped tons of wallpaper, and only once did it leave me with rough walls. A "mud guy" fixed that right up for about fifty bucks.
on Sunday at 11:50am     
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vjs12
If the 1971 wallpaper was put on the drywall without a primer, it will tear up some of the drywall when you try to remove it, then mudding is necessary to fix the damaged areas. You stated it was on there real good with no seams separating so I would leave it. First put a primer, like water base Kilz, then your paint color. I have done this before and you can't tell there is wallpaper under it and the wallpaper doesn't loosen up. If you use an oil base primer (like Linda suggested), then you have to use oil base paint. So I would use a latex (water base) primer, then latex semi-gloss or satin paint. The latex primer seals the wallpaper so it won't loosen, then it is ready for the latex paint.
on Sunday at 12:26pm   
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Linda
In our area, a survey is required for mortgage financing, building and putting up a fence. I have bought several foreclosed properties without surveys. As far as I'm concerned, surveys are not necessary unless you need the exact property lines...if it is just knowing where to mow, I ask the neighbor--it's much cheaper than $375. However, I do have the benefit of high quality local government maps and overhead photos so I know boundaries to a foot or so without a formal survey. My most recent purchase has a large fence post type iron marker about 3 feet high at one corner of the property...that marker and my tape measure saves lots of dollars for other projects
on Sunday at 10:01am        Thanked by Emily Hurley
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architectrunnerguy
Yes, just because you give someone permission to use your land for a specific reason, over time it does not revert to adverse possession.
4 hours ago   
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mairece
Can it be converted to an easement though?
4 hours ago   
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Linda likes an ideabook

Houzz Quiz: What’s Your Decorating Style?

Answer these 9 questions to find out what decorating style suits you best Full Story
     Comment   on Sunday
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lidwicke
I scorer transitional and it is bang…renovating my house now - transitional design!
13 hours ago   
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J LV
I'm coastal, which is partially correct. but I think answering ocean, palm frondes and watery green and blues would give it away. I do like green and have a very naturalist decorating taste but I don't like shells on everything!!
29 minutes ago   
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lellogirl
Our tub sits in an tile-covered alcove, including the ceiling. It is wonderful. I just love it. So much easier to clean, no weird spots of flying suds on drywall! (kids!)
on Sunday at 9:02am   
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Linda
Tiling to the ceiling can be cheaper than having drywall at the top when you figure the cost of ongoing maintenance and repainting. Many times the material cost of bullnose tile or trim pieces is very comparable to the cost of additional field tile. In the long run, having tile all the way to the ceiling is easier to maintain.. I also prefer to tile the lower portion of the bathroom walls. Cleaning tile behind the toilet is much easier than cleaning painted wall surfaces and lasts much longer before needing attention
on Sunday at 9:28am     
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Smart Investments in Kitchen Cabinetry — a Realtor's Advice

Get expert info on what cabinet features are worth the money, for both you and potential buyers of your home Full Story
     Comment   April 7, 2014
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nancyinmich
"Tell us: What are your favorite cabinetry features that you're glad you invested in, either for yourself or for a future sale?"

My favorite cabinetry feature that I invested in for myself was in getting a a set of used, high quality cabinets from GreenDemolitions.com. I bought an entire kitchen full of cabinetry for $3600 and spent under $1000 bringing it to Michigan. I Paid a friend perhaps $100 to scrub off the grime, then I sanded lightly, restained it, and hubby finished it with three coats of polyurethane. Our carpenter did the rest. He put on new oak veneer where he felt the cabinet boxes were worn. He followed my design and repurposed a 27" corner double oven cabinet into a raised dishwasher cabinet. He then made us three cabinets that we needed to make the kitchen perfect: a corner cabinet to fill the gap between our big dish cupboard and the wall oven cabinet on the adjoining wall, a drawer base for under the wall oven, and a cookbook cabinet with a door to match the cabinetry that I had fitted with a fluted glass panel. He reinforced the sink cabinet that had seen better days and converted two 30" wall cabinets to shallow base cabinets for me by making toe kick risers for them. I believe there were three cabinets that we did not use.

By re-using a 24 year-old set of Quakermaid cabinets, I received most of the modern accoutrements that we all love: a 33" base cabinet with pull-out trays, a pull-out tandem trash, pull-outs on either side of the island cooktop, a magical 36" pantry with rotating shelves, a regular 18" pantry cab, a skinny cabinet for trays, flip-out sponge/scrubbie storage panels in front of the sink, and drawers, drawers, drawers - some with dividers included! I have only one traditional base cabinet with shelves, and it is on the desk unit. I use it to hold rarely-used baking pans.

High quality cabinets can last a lifetime. Sometimes a new owner dislikes a cabinet style (mine are modern and unusual) or a homeowner simply wants a change and can afford to completely gut a perfectly good kitchen. When we did this project, I was just on the edge of being physically able to do the project, but we made it! I will be forever glad to look at the kitchen and remember the work we put into it and the money we saved. Having already done one custom kitchen with a wonderful local custom cabinet company, and the contractor who has since become our go-to- guy for everything, I knew what was involved. I just haunted the Green Demolitions site with my graph paper and kitchen dimensions and drew out possibilities with each possible kitchen they offered until the right one came along. It was a fun exercise in geometry and creativity. It challenged me to wait for the right set and not settle on something that "would do". It was also an exercise in waiting for the price to come down vs. the risk of losing out on the kitchen. Since we did our kitchen four years ago, prices at Green Demolitions do have a higher starting price, so that part of the balancing act is even more of a challenge, but the quality of the kitchens they offer has increased, as well. There are more sources for used kitchens, too. In some areas, Habitat for Humanity ReStores have entire kitchens in fairly good shape. Craigslist is another source. Look for quality name brands or older cabinets made without fiberboard. Plywood is a good cabinet box material. Doors should be solid wood or have at least solid wood frames.
April 7, 2014 at 2:46pm     
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     Comment   April 6, 2014
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jill clothier
I'm glad I'm not the only one who can't keep a houseplant alive to save her life. I can grow ANYTHING outdoors, but I treat houseplants like annuals...disposable pretties. They. Will. Die. (eventually).

My biggest decorating mistake was the black and white checkerboard floor in the bathroom. I thought it was going to look so classy and elegant. And it does, for about 10 seconds after I clean it. Take note: SOLID black and SOLID white show EVERYTHING; dog hair, cat hair, people hair, dirt, lint, etc. That floor doesn't hide a thing. And we are messy people...we garden, my husband works construction, we don't take our shoes off in the house, we have pets. And did I mention it's the only bathroom in the house? What was I thinking?! I could mop that floor every day and it would still look dirty 95% of the time. I learned a valuable lesson about my "style"...my floors need to hide dirt!! :)

We are planning on doing some remodeling. So, after 10 years of despising that floor (and having no one to blame but myself), I'm getting rid of my classy, elegant black and white tiles, in favor of something more practical. Now I just need to decide between "muddy paw print brown" or "cat fur gray"...
April 6, 2014 at 5:11am     
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   March 26, 2014
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hayleydaniels
jmk1955, I agree completely!! Why do people think it's a sin to make a profit? Don't they understand all that's involved in running a business, and how many taxes are assessed, especially labor and industry taxes? And the cost of tools and equipment is something else they don't factor in to the equation.

If people think they can do it cheaper, let them. We just renovated our kitchen as my husband enjoys that sort of thing, but it wasn't easy! And it wasn't fast, but it did come out very nice because we took our time and did it right.
March 24, 2014 at 8:36am     
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   March 23, 2014
Linda added 3 photos to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   March 23, 2014
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leendaba
Love my house, it's my creative outlet. Working in banking, it's really great to come home to place hugs me when I walk through the door. I've only been in a year so there is still much to do but I'm loving the journey
last Saturday at 4:10am   
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nannabear
New laundry room vanity. I found the old sewing machine and refinished it. The sink and sewing machine were pretty cheap the taps were almost the same price as the other two but I loved the way it turned out:)
last Saturday at 5:14pm     
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Linda added 11 photos to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   March 22, 2014
Linda added 4 photos to ideabook: small bathrooms
   Comment   March 22, 2014
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Linda
I agree with the comments that most of the issues we see in houses are ignorant mistakes, rather than shyster contractors. Most of the quick buck guys I know aren't intentionally dishonest and do what they think is right and cash-strapped homeowners turn to them when they can't afford the real solution. The problem is many of them are out of their depth when faced with anything more than a basic repair. They can replace a deck board without issue, but don't hire them to design and build your new deck.

For people who live in expensive areas, a several hundred dollar bill for an unexpected issue isn't going to leave them homeless. When you have seniors on a small fixed income or young families working at low paying service and retail jobs, the guy who can keep the house from falling down for the cost of materials, a couple bucks and a case of beer can be a necessary evil.

Some of the issue comes back to the HGTV and other media promoting the quick fixes and the mania for redoing houses just as often as buying a new car. If you can't afford the glitzy Houzz project and the mechanical and structural work, homeowners need to learn to ignore the cosmetic issues. Focus on living in a safe and sound environment, regardless of what it looks like
March 18, 2014 at 7:40am     
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Jessica
Linda, I have to say I agree that TV shows which glamorize quick 3 day renovations or other quick fixes are partly to blame. People see those and expect things to be done quickly. The thing is I can tell while watching that corners are being cut and that long term problems will probably develop. About the only shows I actually feel show the work being done right are the Mike Holmes shows and This Old House shows. Others just tend to gloss over the importance of quality work by trained professionals. I know my uncle could provide all sorts of stories about serious problems with brick and stone masonry work that he gets called in to repair because so many contractors in our area hire day laborers to throw a brick facing on a townhome, or put up a wall, chimney, or brick up a sign post and they have no clue how to mix the mortar properly so after two years the mortar is crumbling and falling out and no amount of repointing can solve the problem. The brick courses are not level and things start falling over from lack of a deep enough properly created foundation. It requires a full tear down, proper foundations laid (usually ignored by those building in a hurry) and rebuilt from scratch. There's an art to building a chimney that actually draws properly and novice bricklayers don't have that skill.
March 18, 2014 at 7:54am     
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