Linda


Business Description
Location:
Elgin, IL US 
Contact:
Linda Hawkins 
Type:
 
Address:
Elgin, IL 60123 
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Yarbro Home Improvement LLC
No border. I'm my opinion, it was a fad that has now become obsolete. I clutters and is especially going to make your shower walls look extremely busy given the 2 niches. Keep the lines clean. My 2 cents
last Friday at 5:55pm        Thanked by tlutkenhaus
Sign Up to comment
Linda likes a comment on an ideabook

14 Things You Need to Start Doing Now for Your Spouse’s Sake

You have no idea how annoying your habits at home can be. We’re here to tell you Full Story
     Comment   July 20, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
vacahaven
My gut is hurting from laughing!! I love them all. Got to share a story: could not get the x husband to close the toilet lid or ever clean the cat box. So... I trained my cat to use the toilet- got rid of the cat box. Cat was doing great!! ThEN the x husband started to close the lid.....cats can't lift lids by themselves... Poor cat. don't worry folks, story ends happy:) cat lives with me:)
July 20, 2014 at 8:11pm     
Sign Up to comment
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
If you have a source for cheap upper cabinets - ReStore, Craigslist, your buddy's sister's contractor, etc - you could add a set of uppers on the empty wall around the corner to the right of the sink. Because it appears to be a narrow cabinet to the right of the sink, you could remove it.

Adding upper cabinets from the corner going toward the door will gain quite a bit of upper storage space. For even more space, replace the existing cabinet with a diagonal corner cabinet then continue down that wall towards the door. Mount a sturdy shelf/countertop, butting up to the existing counter underneath the additional cabinet. You could make it from twelve to 16 inches deep. Shallow countertops can be very useful...many of the items you want to put on the countertop are only a few inches deep, like papertowel holders, mug trees, utensil containers. Another option would be a small cart rolled against the wall underneath the upper storage space.
July 20, 2014 at 8:34pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
Would you consider an over the range microwave/range hood? I've seen them for sale at ReStore for as little as $15-$20 and even free on Craigslist.
July 20, 2014 at 8:37pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Julie Welch
You can also easily add a drop down counter top extension!
July 20, 2014 at 10:26pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
karen3000
When you remodel, make sure your cabinets go up to the ceiling. It prevents dust from accumulating and will give maximum storage. Store infrequently used items at the very top. You can have cabinetry on the wall opposite the fridge. If you can squeeze it it, there are islands on wheels that can be rolled out of the way when you need floor space. You can also turn a storage piece into an island on wheels by adding a stone top or casters.
last Thursday at 7:58am   
Sign Up to comment
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
halbraswell
Unfinished
July 18, 2014 at 5:55pm     
Sign Up to comment
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
To assume something is to make an A$$ out of U and ME.

Until you have worked with a contractor long enough to have complete confidence in their understanding of your desires and their ESP abilities, you must take responsibility for making your wishes clear. The contractor needs to take responsibility for identifying potential issues and discussing them with you while you are available to make the needed decisions.

I've had to have a few very in-depth conversations with my partner's brother over tile layouts. He is a great tile guy in most cases, but I like to do my own measuring and understand the layout before anything is started. One particular project was a mudroom and powder room floor where if the layout started with full tiles in one place, the other area was left with a very small fill-in row which wasn't acceptable to me. I insisted, he shook his head and told me I didn't understand; I told him that I just couldn't accept his layout. After it was finished, he did admit that my layout worked well.
July 20, 2014 at 5:41pm      Thanked by mollyladd
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mollyladd
Kivi- I am grateful to you for your comments and suggestions. I do realize that the whole thing will have to come right down. I'm in a "start over" spot now. I think I'll go to one of the local shops as you mentioned and see if they can help me out. I hadn't thought of that. I realize now how really naive and irresponsible I was with this project. Thanks to you and the others out there who responded, I have much better knowledge of my role in overseeing this.
To you and everyone who commented, I am truly grateful for your help!
July 22, 2014 at 8:33am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Kevin Strader
Our contractor laid out our kitchen floor in two different designs and we looked at it and OK'ed it before he started the actual installation. Your contractor should have asked, but, after not saying anything for three days . . . But, it's your bath, so tear it out and get it done exactly like you want.
July 22, 2014 at 8:50am   
Sign Up to comment
Linda commented on an ideabook

Hiring a Home Inspector? Ask These 10 Questions

How to make sure the pro who performs your home inspection is properly qualified and insured, so you can protect your big investment Full Story
     Comment   July 20, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
Think about the purpose of the inspection - different circumstances require different viewpoints. New, old, small, large, cheap, expensive...every house has issues so be sure to focus on the items which are relevant to your situation.

In a seller's market, you want an inspector who can work quickly to determine the quality of the build and identify any major issues with the property. You want to know if the house is something special that is worth the premium price and whether there are expensive mechanical issues that are serious enough to run away from. In a situation like that, time is of the essence and you don't want to tick off the seller with lots of hassle and laundry lists of small problems

In a buyer's market, a comprehensive listing of all defects, no matter how small, is often a negotiating tool to get significant price reductions. Just be careful not to send a lender a long list of problems - their personnel may not look at the contents, just the size of the file and consign that loan application to the trashcan. One home buyer I know ended up having to get a new lender and pay for a second appraisal after sending in a nitpicky collection of issues of which very few actually indicated anything out of the ordinary for a 90 year old bungalow in a working class neighborhood.

To be useful an inspection report needs to categorize issues - serious, not easily fixable problems (house sliding down a hillside), expensive but fixable problems (new roof needed), quality of life issues (not enough outlets), deferred maintenance (cracked window pane) and safety issues like improper wiring or missing smoke detectors.
July 20, 2014 at 10:31am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
onthecoast1
ChickieD, you can place a bid with the contingency that your bid only stands if the home passes inspection; that way, your bid is no longer binding if something is wrong that the seller is not willing to negotiate on. It's nuts to pay for an inspection on every home you're considering bidding on.
July 23, 2014 at 11:34am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
dreamdoctor
I am one of those people that find too many things wrong (the realtors cringe when they see me coming) - the clients get "buy it " fever and stop taking you along. Then they call you up to tell them what is wrong so you can fix it after they buy it. Doing things right is not easy or fast. Try to not buy a pre-owned home less then ten years old - that is when the real troubles begin to be come "obvious".
July 23, 2014 at 12:24pm   
Sign Up to comment
Linda likes a comment on a discussion
     Comment   July 19, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
easpurk
Small Kitchens with no upper cabinets and just open shelves. I've seen remodels of small kitchens where the upper cabinets are removed for open shelves and a wall of cabinets are knocked out for a more open look. Where would anyone put their stuff? Unless it's a super large kitchen with a big pantry and plenty of lower cabinets, those open shelves are going to get cluttered which is an even bigger design pet peeve. And only stark white of course.
July 18, 2014 at 7:49pm     
Sign Up to comment
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
I prefer tile all the way to the ceiling, but not on the ceiling. I find that with some tiles, the bullnose tiles are expensive enough that it costs no more money to run the tile to the ceiling than to stop short and buy the trim tiles.

I did once assist on a tile job involving a shower with a slanted ceiling where the tile went all the way up, including the flat ceiling. After that adventure, I was cured of ever wanting to do a tiled ceiling myself

The shower in my 1931 house has a tiled ceiling and cleaning the ceiling grout isn't much fun
July 15, 2014 at 6:41pm        Thanked by favoritedog
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
favoritedog
I have enough bullnose and tile to do it either way. If I cut it short, (just above the shower head) I will have enough subway tiles to do my walls. I would just need a chair rail to top the tiles on the walls. It's looking like most suggestions rule out doing the ceiling. So it's between going all the way up the shower walls only, or capping it short and tiling the bathroom walls also.
July 15, 2014 at 6:52pm   
Sign Up to comment
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Linda
House 1 is a classic style that hasn't been significantly changed. Given that the current owner has been using it for income property, save some of your budget for the inevitable discoveries of just "one more thing" and then another and another...

While I understand the charm of an open porch, I think you would be taking a hit on market value to remove the enclosed space. Many houses of that era had enclosed porches; perhaps the best move is to enhance the existing rather than return to original. Some authentic looking windows, perhaps with a square pane on the bottom then a shorter upper area, divided into three sections. Sets of hinged glass doors with permanent screens are common in my area. I would also look to replace the storm door with something where the bottom of the glass panel lined up with the bottom of the windows with a solid wood panel underneath with horizontal lines, not diagonals.

A new paint job using colors found in the porch lower siding and roof would give the house a rather different look. You might want to add a few touches of a dark accent color to pick out a few details. I don't care for white trim with brown or reddish roofs instead I would choose an off white that coordinates with the new body color.
July 15, 2014 at 6:24pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
makaloco
My suggestion: if you get the house (#1), do the necessary interior work first and see where you stand budget-wise. If you can afford to at least paint the exterior, I think it would look much nicer, but it's not horrible as is, and as Darzy mentioned, could be made really appealing with a minimum investment. #2 would have required a lot more exterior work, and the slope of the front yard toward the left side of the house seemed a bit worrying, though it may have been the angle of the photo.
July 15, 2014 at 7:01pm   
Sign Up to comment
Linda likes a comment on an ideabook

What to Look for in a Contractor's Contract

10 basic ingredients for a contract will help pave the way to remodel happiness Full Story
     Comment   July 15, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
The Liquid House
Typically if I trust the customer not to go around behind my back and shop it out then I will provide a categorized breakout of each area, ie, painting ($2650), tile installation ($4635), etc and so on and put very specific details into that category for what is to be included or specified. I will also figure in a profit and overhead line (for which really that has nothing to do with the customer. If you decide to move forward with a job that is $100k then does it really matter what I make if you're agreed to pay $X amount to do X of a project? Where I run into the problem is that if a customer agrees to a price and then if I give them a detailed scope then they start to backpedal and then they want to negotiate or bid it out. You must understand -WE DO NOT GET RICH DOING THIS KIND OF WORK- Contrary to what someone may think, regardless of how the numbers look their are factors in there that you have never considered and at first glance you think you're getting cheated, so long story short is that sometimes they do and sometimes they don't, but there's not a golden rule that says that it has to be done. If you feel that the job is worth $100k and you've received input from other sources (maybe other quotes to see if he is in the ballpark) that you think that is a close number to what others are charging then its at his discretion as to whether or not he may want to release it. Most times when I've run into problems is when I divulge very specific numbers and then the customer feels like they're getting swindled and then they think they can subcontract portions out themselves and get it done cheaper. When this happens I usually have went long enough into the process that I have a rapport with the customer and they have also received other quotes to know that I'm in the neighborhood and by that time, if you feel that you're done your due diligence to receive other quotes and do some research to see what the expected budget for a similar job should be, I've pulled deposit and we've signed contract to move forward. My general discussion with the customer is usually a stern one that says this: "Brian, I understand that you're a CPA, correct?" "Yes, been doing that for 12 years..." "I'm assuming that I probably would not be able to step right into this and do a favorable job without having either training or background in it. Would you say that is a safe assumption?" "I'd say you're right Matt..." "Then what makes you think you can step into my trade after 17 years in the business and do a better job having no experience at it?"
A little harsh, but it gets the point across and typically we don't have issues going forward. I do my job and I do it well, and for that I charge what I charge and as long as it is is in a comfort zone of what the market price is then I won't squabble over how the numbers break out if I do decide to give a breakout.
If you do your homework first to prequal what the job should be priced at, and if you check references on your contractor, then whether he gives you a breakout or doesn't should not be a dealbreaker. This is his call and you need to get unhung from the fact that you want to be up in his business. You pay for what you get and you get what you pay for. Do not try to be up in his business of how he breaks it out or doesn't. If you don't like the $100k pricetag then just say so and shop it out elsewhere but if you are fine with $100k for the work you are having done then move forward. If you're not trusting him at this point then it looks as though you've skipped steps A) have the exact same scope bid through multiple REPUTABLE, LICENSED, INSURED, LEGITIMATE general contractors, and B) do your followup on references (git off your butt and go look at some of his work) and also check the local supply houses or specialty suppliers and get feedback from them on him/her. They won't lie.
July 15, 2014 at 10:25am     
Sign Up to comment
Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: Porches and exterior details
   Comment   July 9, 2014
Linda added 1 product to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   July 1, 2014
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™