Linda


Business Description
Location:
Elgin, IL US 
Contact:
Linda Hawkins 
Type:
 
Address
Elgin, Illinois,
United States, 60123 
Linda likes a comment on an ideabook

Bathroom Workbook: How Much Does a Bathroom Remodel Cost?

Learn what features to expect for $3,000 to $100,000-plus, to help you plan your bathroom remodel Full Story
     Comment   11 hours ago
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Martha Green
Amazing article! Just finished the kitchen, and now focusing on the master bath...so many choices, so much fun. I enjoy the research part more than the actual work - it's so much cleaner. I love Houzz and have gotten so many ideas, and bought my kitchen pendants through the site. Love articles like this - keep it up, Houzz, and thanks!
March 10, 2014 at 8:40am     
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Linda Zaff Architecture, P.C.
People with historic homes and beautiful original windows should definitely think twice before replacing their windows. There are a number of reasons not to replace them. Low-E windows have been very popular, but damage has been found in some cases where the reflection of heat has melted vinyl siding on a neighbor's home. Some vinyl windows do not hold up over time and do not maintain their energy-efficiency. They, too, will need to be replaced at some point. The production of vinyl is not environmentally-friendly at all - if you haven't watched the film "Blue Vinyl", I highly recommend ordering it through Netflix or other medial source. It's an education. And, now, there are new technologies which allow original single-pane glazing to be replaced with energy-efficient insulated glass while keeping the original window frames and sashes. Historic homes with original windows have more character and value. Preservation and re-use are very environmentally-friendly approaches when it comes to our homes and buildings. Check out these web sites for more information! http://www.viridianwindow.com/ http://www.bi-glass.com/old-home-restoration.php
on Monday at 4:07pm     
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amjbauman
I have done the vinyl replacements on rental properties and houses I am s selling, and it is quick and painless. The 110 year old home we live in now got the wooden windows restored however. We have storm windows which help with energy efficiency. Original wood windows, properly maintained can last another 100 years. Vinyl windows will fail after 15-20 years, and even replacement springs only last 10 years +/-. The cost of restoration was comparable to the installation of cheap vinyl windows.
12 hours ago     
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Kenyon McIntyre Inc.
we don't store it we drink it....
on Sunday at 7:30pm     
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Linda
A few years ago, we removed all the wallpaper in my entire house. The house was built in 1931 and all the walls were wallpaper, except for closets and a storage room, and had never been painted.

One advantage of plaster walls is you can use more water without damaging the surface. I have used different methods but found the garden sprayer with hot water to work the best for most of the surfaces. We used a handheld wallpaper steamer but it didn't cover a large enough area. we also used a fabric steamer which worked well for the low areas where you could leave the tank on the floor. Eventually we upgraded to a commercial fabric steamer with a longer hose and wider wand which worked well. interestingly enough, the person I bought the steamer from had been using it to steam carpet seams and wrinkles, instead of clothing.

we found those large yellow sponges used for grouting work well for washing off the remnants of wallpaper paste.
on Monday at 9:06pm   
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Bonnie
Score-it, Steam-it, and Scrape-it and yes it is more work than you might think.
3 hours ago   
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merrigay
Personally I don't like the steamers--at least not the ones I've used. They only cover a small area at a time. The easiest way I've found which was shared by a professional wallpaper hanger/remover is to use a spray bottle of water as hot as you can handle--and I do mean hot--and spray a section and then peel with a scraper.
29 minutes ago   
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Linda added 29 photos to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   April 15, 2014
Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: staircase details
   Comment   April 15, 2014
Linda added 2 photos to ideabook: outdoor ideas
   Comment   April 15, 2014
Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: lindylou's ideas
   Comment   April 15, 2014
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   Comment   April 13, 2014
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Al Fortunato Furnituremaker
When you get your stain samples, make sure the finish is also applied. The finish changes the final color and look.
April 13, 2014 at 9:36am     
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Linda
Remove if at all possible without total destruction of the surface

If you must leave it, be sure to prime with oil based primer before continuing
April 13, 2014 at 11:24am   
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lellogirl
I painted over wallpaper in a long and narrow closet once. It was fine, because there were no seams. I don't think I'd do that in a room.
I have stripped tons of wallpaper, and only once did it leave me with rough walls. A "mud guy" fixed that right up for about fifty bucks.
April 13, 2014 at 11:50am     
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vjs12
If the 1971 wallpaper was put on the drywall without a primer, it will tear up some of the drywall when you try to remove it, then mudding is necessary to fix the damaged areas. You stated it was on there real good with no seams separating so I would leave it. First put a primer, like water base Kilz, then your paint color. I have done this before and you can't tell there is wallpaper under it and the wallpaper doesn't loosen up. If you use an oil base primer (like Linda suggested), then you have to use oil base paint. So I would use a latex (water base) primer, then latex semi-gloss or satin paint. The latex primer seals the wallpaper so it won't loosen, then it is ready for the latex paint.
April 13, 2014 at 12:26pm   
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Linda
In our area, a survey is required for mortgage financing, building and putting up a fence. I have bought several foreclosed properties without surveys. As far as I'm concerned, surveys are not necessary unless you need the exact property lines...if it is just knowing where to mow, I ask the neighbor--it's much cheaper than $375. However, I do have the benefit of high quality local government maps and overhead photos so I know boundaries to a foot or so without a formal survey. My most recent purchase has a large fence post type iron marker about 3 feet high at one corner of the property...that marker and my tape measure saves lots of dollars for other projects
April 13, 2014 at 10:01am        Thanked by Emily Hurley
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vesperholly
Living in a rural community when I asked the city where the property lines for our house were I received a print out from google maps with yellow lines and told its good within a few feet. Yeah I feel confident.
last Saturday at 10:45pm   
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mairece
@Kris, get an "outside" dog or a small dog. The deterrent is many times in the bark rather than the size.
@vesperholly, LOL! Don'cha love it? Believe me, that happens in the cities too.
on Sunday at 3:06am   
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Houzz Quiz: What's Your Decorating Style?

Answer these 9 questions to find out what decorating style suits you best Full Story
     Comment   April 13, 2014
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shahrizat
Midcentury modern. I absolutely LOVE Eames, Knoll, Saarinen and Noguchi. So accurate I got chills. Just not sure about the cocktail parties part though.
Yesterday at 1:03am   
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Andrea Kornfeld
Wow was this wrong. It said midcentury modern but I love country chic. The questions didn't give me enough choices and I simply chose the least objectionable one of the list.
16 hours ago   
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lellogirl
Our tub sits in an tile-covered alcove, including the ceiling. It is wonderful. I just love it. So much easier to clean, no weird spots of flying suds on drywall! (kids!)
April 13, 2014 at 9:02am   
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Linda
Tiling to the ceiling can be cheaper than having drywall at the top when you figure the cost of ongoing maintenance and repainting. Many times the material cost of bullnose tile or trim pieces is very comparable to the cost of additional field tile. In the long run, having tile all the way to the ceiling is easier to maintain.. I also prefer to tile the lower portion of the bathroom walls. Cleaning tile behind the toilet is much easier than cleaning painted wall surfaces and lasts much longer before needing attention
April 13, 2014 at 9:28am     
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Smart Investments in Kitchen Cabinetry — a Realtor's Advice

Get expert info on what cabinet features are worth the money, for both you and potential buyers of your home Full Story
     Comment   April 7, 2014
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nancyinmich
"Tell us: What are your favorite cabinetry features that you're glad you invested in, either for yourself or for a future sale?"

My favorite cabinetry feature that I invested in for myself was in getting a a set of used, high quality cabinets from GreenDemolitions.com. I bought an entire kitchen full of cabinetry for $3600 and spent under $1000 bringing it to Michigan. I Paid a friend perhaps $100 to scrub off the grime, then I sanded lightly, restained it, and hubby finished it with three coats of polyurethane. Our carpenter did the rest. He put on new oak veneer where he felt the cabinet boxes were worn. He followed my design and repurposed a 27" corner double oven cabinet into a raised dishwasher cabinet. He then made us three cabinets that we needed to make the kitchen perfect: a corner cabinet to fill the gap between our big dish cupboard and the wall oven cabinet on the adjoining wall, a drawer base for under the wall oven, and a cookbook cabinet with a door to match the cabinetry that I had fitted with a fluted glass panel. He reinforced the sink cabinet that had seen better days and converted two 30" wall cabinets to shallow base cabinets for me by making toe kick risers for them. I believe there were three cabinets that we did not use.

By re-using a 24 year-old set of Quakermaid cabinets, I received most of the modern accoutrements that we all love: a 33" base cabinet with pull-out trays, a pull-out tandem trash, pull-outs on either side of the island cooktop, a magical 36" pantry with rotating shelves, a regular 18" pantry cab, a skinny cabinet for trays, flip-out sponge/scrubbie storage panels in front of the sink, and drawers, drawers, drawers - some with dividers included! I have only one traditional base cabinet with shelves, and it is on the desk unit. I use it to hold rarely-used baking pans.

High quality cabinets can last a lifetime. Sometimes a new owner dislikes a cabinet style (mine are modern and unusual) or a homeowner simply wants a change and can afford to completely gut a perfectly good kitchen. When we did this project, I was just on the edge of being physically able to do the project, but we made it! I will be forever glad to look at the kitchen and remember the work we put into it and the money we saved. Having already done one custom kitchen with a wonderful local custom cabinet company, and the contractor who has since become our go-to- guy for everything, I knew what was involved. I just haunted the Green Demolitions site with my graph paper and kitchen dimensions and drew out possibilities with each possible kitchen they offered until the right one came along. It was a fun exercise in geometry and creativity. It challenged me to wait for the right set and not settle on something that "would do". It was also an exercise in waiting for the price to come down vs. the risk of losing out on the kitchen. Since we did our kitchen four years ago, prices at Green Demolitions do have a higher starting price, so that part of the balancing act is even more of a challenge, but the quality of the kitchens they offer has increased, as well. There are more sources for used kitchens, too. In some areas, Habitat for Humanity ReStores have entire kitchens in fairly good shape. Craigslist is another source. Look for quality name brands or older cabinets made without fiberboard. Plywood is a good cabinet box material. Doors should be solid wood or have at least solid wood frames.
April 7, 2014 at 2:46pm     
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     Comment   April 6, 2014
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jill clothier
I'm glad I'm not the only one who can't keep a houseplant alive to save her life. I can grow ANYTHING outdoors, but I treat houseplants like annuals...disposable pretties. They. Will. Die. (eventually).

My biggest decorating mistake was the black and white checkerboard floor in the bathroom. I thought it was going to look so classy and elegant. And it does, for about 10 seconds after I clean it. Take note: SOLID black and SOLID white show EVERYTHING; dog hair, cat hair, people hair, dirt, lint, etc. That floor doesn't hide a thing. And we are messy people...we garden, my husband works construction, we don't take our shoes off in the house, we have pets. And did I mention it's the only bathroom in the house? What was I thinking?! I could mop that floor every day and it would still look dirty 95% of the time. I learned a valuable lesson about my "style"...my floors need to hide dirt!! :)

We are planning on doing some remodeling. So, after 10 years of despising that floor (and having no one to blame but myself), I'm getting rid of my classy, elegant black and white tiles, in favor of something more practical. Now I just need to decide between "muddy paw print brown" or "cat fur gray"...
April 6, 2014 at 5:11am     
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Linda added 1 photo to ideabook: woodard kitchen
   Comment   March 26, 2014
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hayleydaniels
jmk1955, I agree completely!! Why do people think it's a sin to make a profit? Don't they understand all that's involved in running a business, and how many taxes are assessed, especially labor and industry taxes? And the cost of tools and equipment is something else they don't factor in to the equation.

If people think they can do it cheaper, let them. We just renovated our kitchen as my husband enjoys that sort of thing, but it wasn't easy! And it wasn't fast, but it did come out very nice because we took our time and did it right.
March 24, 2014 at 8:36am     
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