Waterfront Home, Nanoose Bay, Vancouver Island

Two separate, self-contained homes were created that are bridged by a shared entry pavilion. A storm water culvert that passes directly through the site was managed and transformed to create a water feature that cascades down the sloping site, pausing in a pool which passes beneath the entry pavilion, before finally spilling over a cliff and into the ocean below. The placement of buildings on the site was carefully considered to provide living spaces which extend into the garden as well as capture views and provide abundant natural daylight. Skylights were used extensively to bring light deep into rooms which would otherwise have no access to daylight. Of the many conscientious choices that were made by the owner in the construction of this house, the most impressive, by far, is the decision to install a geo-thermal heat pump system with a heat recovery loop in the ocean below, to provide heat (radiant in-floor) and domestic hot water for less than $1 a day. There are future plans to install an extensive green roof.
Kenyon's Pad
Ideabooks3
Questions0
SOS Design
“Exterior” — debrarapske
“the walkway” — kobeniki
“Use of frosted glass and wood” — Martha Velarde
Kenyon's Pad
Ideabooks6
Questions0
SOS Design
“The Pool & the view isn't bad either” — Najoie
“privacy & deer wall” — lmmcclung
“Landscaping with water feature.” — joevrub
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