61,203 roses for pots Home Design Photos

Liquidscapes
14 Reviews
Howard Roberts
Ideabooks2,985
Questions1
15-inch-deep pots for small shrub roses up to 2 to 3 feet tall; and 18- to 22-inch-deep pots for larger shrub roses that grow up to 4 feet tall.
will find that clay pots do a better job at keeping rose roots cool during hot summers. Use containers that are large enough for the type of rose you'll be growing — 10-inch-deep containers for miniature roses up to 1 1/2 feet tall; at least 1-foot-deep containers for patio roses up to 2 feet tall;
15-inch-deep pots for small shrub roses up to 2 to 3 feet tall; and 18- to 22-inch-deep pots for larger shrub roses that grow up to 4 feet tall.
How to use it. Because of their medium size, Knock Out roses complement any landscape and are perfect in perennial borders and container plantings. They also combine beautifully with other flowering plants, provided you choose those with similar sun and water requirements.Daylilies (Hemerocallis spp
“Guide to rosé growing” — dulcie01
Margie Grace - Grace Design Associates
16 Reviews
Grace Design Associates
Ideabooks2,122
Questions2
Hi, I absolutely LOVE this look for my front steps. Can you please tell me what the roses are and would they bloom the first year? Thank you.
Love the roses in the urns
Floribunda Rose, bacopa and Ivy glacier
Planter style for deck - overflowing with white roses - perfect
White Iceberg rose. They are a floribunda rose; they typically bloom the first year. Trailers are Ivy "Glacier" and Bacopa
Love the vintage look on pots, plus great plants to add inside
13. Go for classic style. White roses are a girl's best friend (or is that diamonds?). Whatever your taste, a lush urn overflowing with blooms can make the heart swell. And did I mention the scent?
12. Urns, planters and garden art. An old pot has so much more character, and often a more graceful
“Beautiful and classic for the Secret Garden” — janematthews
Margie Grace - Grace Design Associates
16 Reviews
Grace Design Associates
Ideabooks2,340
Questions2
what is the name of the rose used in this pot? also the ivy? it looks so good :)
Margie, have you ever used Alba Meidiland rose in this same situation? I love this rose for containers.
blooming roses and trailing ivy. Shown: Iceberg Rose with Glacier Ivy
Iceberg Floribunda White Roses in urn! Gorgeous!
Shown: Iceberg Rose with Glacier Ivy
luv the roses in the planter
Roses look right at home in this Gothic inspired garden container.
Iceberg rose, glacier ivy...lovely, and I will also take the urn. Now.
Italian garden with an oversize urn. It's hard to beat the romance of a weathered urn brimming with blooming roses and trailing ivy. Shown: Iceberg Rose with Glacier Ivy
Plants of a Gothic GardenRoses should be included in your Gothic garden. They were a favorite in medieval art and tapestries, and even
“Love it” — dulcie01
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Joani Stewart-Georgi - Montana Ave. Interiors
18 Reviews
outdoor spaces
Ideabooks7,392
Questions7
The lighting on the table is an upside down chandelier. The climbing iceberg roses on the trellis gives drama to an otherwise boring wall. Douglas Hill Photography
How do u get climbing roses to grow in a pot? Do u have to do anything
It's a variety of white climbing rose ....google a reputable mail order source.
Also instructions on container rose gardening
Like the flower pots with growing flowers against the wall
roses on trellis against patio wall
2. Mix your soil. Roses are heavy feeders, needing a lot of nutrients to keep growing and blooming. Container-grown roses will need a consistent diet of quality soil and nutrients, so get them off to a good start when planting. Mix together in equal amounts:• Potting soil• Garden compost• Well-rotted
“heaven” — sallyclaire
Donna Lynn - Landscape Designer
White Roses, White Classic Container
Ideabooks1,022
Questions4
lynnlandscapedesign.com - White rose planter at carriage house - guest house. photo: Donna Lynn
Hello, This is EXACTLY what I am looking for and so beautiful!!! Can you please tell me what kind of rose this is? Thank you.
Is this a groundcover rose or other?
Wondering if this is a special variety that can overwinter in a pot. We are in zone 6.
'iceburg' rose - 'pillow fight' rose
Love that rose, I want to find an Iceburg rose!
i like white roses. maybe potted...
well in a pot. Other good choices for containers include low, compact types, such as 'Flower Carpet Appleblossom' (pink) and 'Caramba' (red)
love the planter painted white and white iceberg rose
Japanese maple and sasanqua camellias. You'll need a pot measuring 2 inches taller and wider than the plant's root ball. Use nursery potting mix unless you have your own.
“White roses in flower pot” — sharpmountain
Gaulhofer Windows
1 Review
custom windows
Ideabooks2,872
Questions2
Would like some roses ? Climbing on wall
use of roses and textured green bushes
Simple roses and a chunky terra cotta
the front needs more roses. Contrasting such as deep red, black and purple? in front of house
Pot paired with roses? works well
A variety of surrounding plants lighten up the look of a formal rose plot. The roses are still separate and easy to feed, prune and spray, but the look is far from dull.
aphids, chinch bugs, fleas, ticks, chiggers, grubs, scale, powdery mildew and webworms. Some ornamental plants, such as roses, are especially susceptible to aphids and powdery mildew, so stay on top of these problems before they take their toll in your garden. To manage pests, start with the least invasive
“French Provincial 24” — koossmit
Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design LLC
10 Reviews
Commonwealth Avenue Garden
Ideabooks672
Questions2
hardy shrubs, perennials, grasses, and herbs; a paper birch and a wind-sculpted spruce lend dramatic texture, structure, and scale to the space. Rugosa rose, juniper, lilac, peony, iris, perovskia, artemisia, nepeta, heuchera, sedum, and ornamental grasses survive year round and paint a brilliant summer-long
circulation around your roses, which reduces the risk of fungal diseases. Potted roses need the same amount of full sunlight (at least six to seven hours a day) and the same pruning regime and schedule as inground roses.
4. Care for your roses. You'll need to fertilize and water container roses more often than those planted in the ground. If
around your roses, which reduces the risk of fungal diseases. Potted roses need the same amount of full sunlight (at least six to seven hours a day) and the same pruning regime and schedule as inground roses.
“Tomy” — 1gabrielle
Scot Meacham Wood Design
Scot Meacham Wood Design
Ideabooks18,911
Questions10
row of greenery in pots, the black stripe
Little pots for edging. Could be fake plants to create a mass effect in a difficult area.
The garden received fresh hardscape and landscaping. Bordered by rose bushes, potted boxwoods, and Camilla trees, the heart of the garden makes for a well-loved entertaining hot spot. Teak outdoor furniture, rug, and pillows all from Ballard Design maintain the classic feel of the home's interior.
Once summer is in full bloom, I’ll likely want to trade my potted centerpiece for a vase full of cut flowers from my garden. In that case I’ll take a cue from this image, layering the objects on my table and varying
“lovely payed eating outdoor” — lucarol
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