226 seedlings Home Design Photos

Amy Renea
Longwood Gardens
Ideabooks432
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garden or their permanent containers. Tip: Cover the seedlings with bird netting when you set them out. Birds and other critters find those tender seedlings very tasty. Amy Renea Save to Ideabook Email Photo Alternatives You can start seedlings inside your home, but outdoor cold frames, cloches
growing in a cold frame, whether you start seeds there or set out the seedlings, once you want to harden off plants, simply open the cover a bit each day and close it at night. Gradually increase the amount the cover is open until the seedlings are ready for planting. Extend your growing season in an outdoor
have a lot of seedlings. Burpee Save to Ideabook Email Photo Lean-To Greenhouse - $215.95 2 Hayneedle Save to Ideabook Email Photo Janssens Royal Victorian Greenhouse Kit - $8,399.99 2 If you’re lucky enough to have a greenhouse, this is an ideal location for seedlings. If it’s warm enough
“mini greenhouse” — cheech28md
Sheila Schmitz
Spring seedlings
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plants will be fine with average home temperatures. Watering from a tray placed under the seedling containers is good way to keep the soil moist but not overly wet. Caring for Seedlings Once the seedlings start emerging, remove the plastic covering and move the plants into a brightly lit spot with
4-inch pots are a common size for seedlings that have outgrown their seed trays. Tempting as this is, especially if the seedlings look crowded, be patient. The first “leaves” to emerge are not really leaves, but rather cotyledons, which provide the first food for the seedlings. Wait until the true leaves
crowding by thinning your seedlings according to the instructions on your seed packet. If you don’t have a bright spot in your home, a grow-light setup with or without a heating mat underneath will work. Keep the light about 3 inches above the plants, raising it as the seedlings grow. Plants will need
“Planting Plant 2 seeds per small starting pot, or scatter seeds across the top of the mix in a seed” — lyvigil
J Biochemist
Teucrium hircanicum
Ideabooks700
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wide Benefits and tolerances: Flowers attract butterflies and bees; heat and drought tolerant Seasonal interest: Summer flowers When to plant: Plant seedlings in spring or fall; self-sows profusely
wideBenefits and tolerances: Flowers attract butterflies and bees; heat and drought tolerantSeasonal interest: Summer flowersWhen to plant: Plant seedlings in spring or fall; self-sows profusely
“The scent of sage also helps with memory and makes us feel more aler” — margielynnj
jonathan alderson landscape architects, inc.
Sustainable House
Ideabooks686
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for insects and birds and spiders and frogs and kids. Nature abhors a vacuum, and mulch is a vacuum devoid of life. In nature smaller plants and seedlings are the mulch, in effect. So if you’re actively planting a new bed from scratch, consider what shorter plant to use in front and under taller ones
for insects and birds and spiders and frogs and kids. Nature abhors a vacuum, and mulch is a vacuum devoid of life. In nature smaller plants and seedlings are the mulch, in effect. So if you’re actively planting a new bed from scratch, consider what shorter plant to use in front and under taller ones
“rudbeckia” — desertmantotile
Amy Renea
Garden Tour
Ideabooks1,296
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For spring crops, sow seeds or set out seedlings in early spring. (See thinning recommendations for spacing.) Continue to sow or transplant every couple of weeks so you’ll have a continuous crop, keeping in mind that unless the garden is shaded
maturity and levels of heat tolerance. Look for lettuces that will do well in your climate. When to plant: For spring crops, sow seeds or set out seedlings in early spring. (See thinning recommendations for spacing.) Continue to sow or transplant every couple of weeks so you’ll have a continuous crop
When to plant: For spring crops, sow seeds or set out seedlings in early spring. (See thinning recommendations for spacing.) Continue to sow or transplant every couple of weeks so you’ll have a continuous crop
“great idea!” — maryn
Luci.D Interiors
1 Review
Harriet Goodall
Ideabooks3,536
Questions2
(they need 14 hours of light per day). When the seedlings develop their first true leaves, thin to the best plant per pot, removing any weedy-looking or misshapen seedlings. Feed every two weeks with a half-strength fertilizer solution. As the seedlings grow, check their root systems to make sure the
into a larger pot if necessary. Once the danger of frost has passed, slowly harden off the seedlings before planting outdoors, gradually exposing them to direct sunlight and cooler temperatures. Seedlings shouldn't be planted out too late: the plants need 10 to 14 days of temperatures below 10°C to
“Urban Garden” — gdonnie
Escarole
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care: Sow arugula seeds 1/2 inch deep and 2 inches apart or scatter them over a garden bed. Add a complete fertilizer at planting time. Once the seedlings have developed at least four leaves, thin to 6 inches apart. (You can eat the thinnings.) Keep the soil moist and free of weeds. Arugula reseeds freely
and 2 inches apart; thin to 6 to 8 inches apart. You can also scatter seeds over a garden bed. Cover with a fine layer of soil and keep moist until seedlings form. Continue to supply regular water and keep the bed weed free. Pests include slugs and snails, aphids, cabbage loopers, cutworms, flea beetles
care: Sow arugula seeds 1/2 inch deep and 2 inches apart or scatter them over a garden bed. Add a complete fertilizer at planting time. Once the seedlings have developed at least four leaves, thin to 6 inches apart. (You can eat the thinnings.) Keep the soil moist and free of weeds. Arugula reseeds freely
“Popular Salad Greens Arugula (this photo), also called roquette or rocket, is one of the premier gr” — barbmarcell
Le jardinet
narrow trees for narrow gardens
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cultivar is one to include no matter how large or small your garden may be. Origin: This cultivar was discovered in the Netherlands in 2002 as a seedling. Where it will grow: Hardy to -40 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 3 to 7; find your zone) Water requirement: Average Light requirement: Full sun Mature
cultivar is one to include no matter how large or small your garden may be. Origin: This cultivar was discovered in the Netherlands in 2002 as a seedling. Where it will grow: Hardy to -40 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 3 to 7; find your zone) Water requirement: Average Light requirement: Full sun Mature
through shades of chartreuse to gold, while in winter it takes on an orange cast. Origin: This cultivar was discovered in the Netherlands in 2002 as a seedling. Hardy to -40 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 3 to 7 Water requirement: Average Light requirement: Full sun Mature size: 15 to 20 feet tall and 3
“plants” — margwin
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