18,695 terrarium container Home Design Photos

jenny_hardgrave
Flower Gardens in the South
Ideabooks2,374
Questions1
make this container this spring! I see four different flowers but three were listed.
containers in the garden..what a concept!
You can also use containers within your existing cottage garden. They're a great way to add a decorative element, and easy to swap out if the plants start to look shabby.
cottage container can work very well. Set it on a patio or in an entryway to get the look, even if you don't have the land.Design tip: You can also use containers within your existing cottage garden. They're a great way to add a decorative element, and easy to swap out if the plants start to look shabby
“plant ideal” — flowergirl4
Northern VA Landscape Architect & Designer
Best of Houzz 2013 & 2014
Since 1999, we have worked with homeowners to develop truly unique and distinctive outdoor living spaces. We specialize in upscale poolscapes, hardscapes and landscapes.
Sponsored
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
4 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks144
Questions0
mixes for container gardens need to drain freely, but still retain moisture. My base potting soil mix contains (clockwise from upper left) coarse builder's sand, high-quality organic compost or worm castings, coconut coir, and small lava rock. I supplement this with additional compost, fresh worm castings
2. Prep your soil. Ask people who grow a lot of edibles for their secret, and chances are they will all tell you the same thing: good soil. Container gardens need soil that is quick draining, moisture retentive and nutrient rich. Nurseries sell organic potting mixes, but you can
Nurseries sell organic potting mixes, but you can also make your own. Masley warns against using soil directly from the yard as it often contains clay and silt, causing drainage problems. Masley has devised his own organic potting mix recipe: One part coarse (builder’s)
“Masley has devised his own organic potting mix recipe: One part coarse (builder’s) sand Two parts” — miditao
Monrovia
Nagami Kumquat
Ideabooks604
Questions0
Shown here is 'Nagami' kumquat, with glossy thumb-size fruits. The bushy, shiny-leafed plant is small enough to live in a container for several years. Move your container plant into a protected spot (or indoors) if winter nights get too chilly. Botanical name: Fortunella margarita
live in containers for several years. Move your container plant into a protected spot (or indoors) if winter nights get too chilly. USDA zones: 9-10 (find your zone) Water requirement: Moderate, more often in hot climates Light requirement: Full sun or part shade especially in a container in hottest
live in a container for several years. Move your container plant into a protected spot (or indoors) if winter nights get too chilly. Botanical name: Fortunella margarita 'Nagami' Where it will grow: USDA zones 9–10 Water requirement: Moderate, more often in hot climates Light requirement: Full sun or
“Beautiful kumquats. I am hungry and could eat them like grapes!” — krudnyk
Exteriorscapes llc
2 Reviews
Exteriorscapes
Ideabooks919
Questions1
of containers and I use a powdered fertilizer that I mix with water. There are three numbers on fertilizers. I use 15-30-15 (Miracle Grow is one brand name that has these numbers) for flowering containers and 20-20-20 for containers that are mainly evergreen plants. There are other brands you can use
in each container every 10 days. Make sure the soil is moist before adding your fertilizer. I get great results with this amount of fertilizing! There are also fertilizers that are slow release that you put on the surface of the containers and every time you water it activates the fertilizer. (grey pellets
results with container plants you must fertilize. You need a good quality potting soil mix and not regular top soil. Top soil is much too "heavy" and compacts which does not allow good root growth. Plants really don't get nutrients from potting soils....you have to feed them with fertilizer. I plant a lot of
“Planter” — crawford5
Kate Michels Landscape Design
4 Reviews
Mediterranean Garden
Ideabooks3,409
Questions2
This container is filled with a variety of Echeveria and Sedum. The red plants are Echeveria agaroides.
This container is filled with a variety of Echeveria and Sedum. The red plants are Echeveria agaroides.
for either pots or small section on right with limited sun, multi plants for small contained space
Love the different types of containers being used, great ideas!
in the container shown here, prefer the soil to completely dry out between waterings. If watered too often, these plants will decline. Some plants, such as many tropicals, prefer moist soil. This means you don’t want to let the soil become dry to the touch. You can also find the water needs by individual
“love this pos” — 1remodel
Margie Grace - Grace Design Associates
15 Reviews
Grace Design Associates
Ideabooks2,674
Questions1
...teepee inside contained for climbing veggies
another way to deal with veggies - a few separate containers
Use of containers in small yard.
colorful containers set among flowering perennials in the curb strip and along the driveway about eight years ago. The large pots provide plenty of no-bend, clean-shoe gardening (my favorite kind). The pots are placed where there's great sun exposure and air circulation, providing structure, color and interest
“Container garden” — nursejonduty
Brittany (aka Pretty Handy Girl)
3 Reviews
Laundry Room
Ideabooks2,694
Questions1
Container Store, Sur la Table, World Market . . . they all have stoppered bottles like this one. About $6 each.
I like this idea for the containers in the window
Put cleaning liquids/powders in attractive containers and place out in the open.
Containers for products
soap & liquid softener container
Cool containers for laundry products
Containers for laundry soap, etc.
storage containers...of ugly containers.
“Bottles for laundry liquid” — nancyjoe75
Linda Daley
Gold Showers
Ideabooks1,592
Questions0
Creeping Jenny - use as spiller in fall container
plant in containers, dripping down the sides and accenting richly hued flowers and foliage, including asters and Red Star spike. USDA zones: 3 to 9
Container use - lasts through fall
plant in containers; accents richly hues flowers and foliage including asters and Red Star spike.
Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’) Creeping Jenny will keep its bright chartreuse color for several frosts. It makes a terrific “spiller” plant in containers, dripping down the sides and accenting richly hued flowers and foliage
plant in containers, dripping down the sides and accenting richly hued flowers and foliage, including asters and Red Star spike.USDA zones: 3 to 9Water requirement: Medium moisture to wet; well-drained soilLight requirement: Full sun to partial shadeMature size: 3 inches tall and 1 to 1 1/2 feet wide
“creeping jenny” — bab327
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™