Allison Capps


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Home owner 
Allison Capps added 9 photos to ideabook: Allison Capps's Ideas
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9 Exit Strategies for Your Clutter

How to efficiently — and regularly — rid your home of the things you don’t want Full Story
     Comment   July 9, 2014
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martinmittelmark
SAY GOOD BY TO CLUTTER

Say good by to clutter.

Just send
It
On its way.

And you will feel,

Totally free.

Like
A spirit

In
Utter

Harmony.

Catching the breeze,

Feeling at ease.

Doing so,

Just
As
You please.


Say good by to clutter.

Yes,
Send it

On its way.

And the day
It
Will
Be

Glorious.

Where
E’er,
It is,

You stay.
July 7, 2014 at 7:07am     
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Allison Capps added 1 photo to ideabook: Allison Capps's Ideas
   Comment   July 9, 2014
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A Surefire Way to Prevent Sun Damage Indoors

Why let light ruin your furniture, floors and artwork, when the solution could be as simple as applying high-quality window film? Full Story
     Comment   July 8, 2014
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seasiderunner
@quarks, I took your advice and Googled it. According to UC Berkeley: "Water reflects up to 100% of UV radiation. Snow reflects 85% of UV radiation."

This clearly explains how I get sunburns under my chin when out on a boat, or swimming or skiing for extended periods without proper sunscreen. :-/
July 6, 2014 at 6:05am     
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jpbathroom
We live in southern Ohio and our house faces west so we get morning sun in the back and harsh afternoon sun in the front. It's been a problem for years. We love our wood windows and after having them reglazed we had them tinted. What a difference it is making! Before, we had blinds on all the windows and had to keep them closed most of the day, but no more. The blinds are gone and the light coming into the house is beautiful. Two windows on the south side look a little darker from the outside but so what? We don't spend all our time standing outside checking out 2 windows. Would do it again in a heartbeat!
July 6, 2014 at 6:07am     
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casabonnie
After 30 years of living with a large, west facing window in the living room and enduring the heat every summer (was great in the winter months), we lived like moles all summer with blinds closed to help keep the sun out. We have just found a wonderful product, Mylar film roller shade that can be lowered or raised as needed. The specs are great for UV rays and heat deterent, They will be installed in a few weeks, so will let you know how wonderful they are!
July 6, 2014 at 7:34am     
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deirdreg52
I am pretty sure that you have just saved me a fortune and the anguish that comes with looking at shades that I didn't want in the first place
bless you!
July 6, 2014 at 7:49am     
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imissliberty
UV radiation is necessary for Life, and it helps prevent skin cancer - the right frequency, that is. Unfortunately, glass cuts out the beneficial frequency of UV and lets the damaging UV come in. This is why skin cancer is more common than in history: too much sun through glass. Beneficial UV boosts anti-cancer Vitamin D production and is good for one's health.
July 6, 2014 at 7:49am     
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Houzz Call: Are You Letting Go of Your Lawn?

Many facing a drought are swapping turf for less thirsty plantings. If you’re one of them, we’d like to hear about it Full Story
     Comment   July 8, 2014
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Sauve
We live in France, inbetween Normandy but within the Iles de France outer circle. Lawns occur naturally here because of the climate and rain. Still, the builder of the house we've bought, seeded the lawn with grass. It is a huge area to mow, taking just a little over an 90 minutes on a riding mower. But we won't keep it. I plan on reducing it by 15% every year, with 30% the first year, until we have a small lawn in the front of the house that and a slightly larger one in the back of the house. And if I can manage it, I would like the 'lawn' in the front to consist of herbs like creeping thyme, rosemary, etc., and similar smaller plantings. The grass in the back I will keep for the dogs who love it.
July 5, 2014 at 7:20am     
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edwards4four
We love our pea gravel - little maintenance, less mosquitos, no water, better for poop patrol (3 dogs)....I just hate seeing sprinklers going over large areas of grass in our drought stricken TX.
July 5, 2014 at 10:25am     
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kendrakj
This is our "front lawn" We have never owned a mower in our 7 years here. It did take a lot of planting and effort in the first year, and some transplanting in the next few years. Now, I hardly ever water except for my flower boxes. I have a crew help me in the spring with clean-up and putting the garden to bed in the fall.
I walk through this beautiful space everyday from the gravel parking area.
We do have to walk the dogs as there is no area for them to do their thing. But, that gets us out and moving everyday.
Everyone, enjoy what you have in nature no matter if you love lawn or native planting a.
July 5, 2014 at 12:45pm     
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crowand
We just replaced our tired front lawn in Pasadena CA with water wise plants and a seating area. We received a rebate from the city of $1 per square foot of converted turf. We converted about 1900 sq feet. We love our new front yard.
July 5, 2014 at 10:55pm     
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acadie
We recently had a new septic system installed at our cottage on the coast of Maine. It was contoured to fit into the existing slope, and rather than seed the top we installed sods of native plants -- a mix of low blueberries, wintergreen and sheep laurel. We anticipate that ferns and other natives will move in over time.
July 6, 2014 at 4:34am     
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Can You Handle That Fixer-Upper?

Learn from homeowners who bought into major renovation projects to see if one is right for you Full Story
     Comment   July 8, 2014
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Peggy Tupper
One has to be young and energetic to tackle a fixer upper. My first house was old and grubby but in an excellent area. It was structurally solid and had a new heating system. Initially all I did was paint. After living in the house for a year or so, I hired a contractor and reconfigured the kitchen, put patio doors into the dining room and a deck on the back. Next, the basement was finished with a second bathroom to provide more living space. Later the upstairs was reconfigured and the main bathroom replaced. It was 7 years of "make do" until I could afford more renos. If I were young and energetic I would do it again. I am past shoveling debris and drywall dust.

Over the years I have owned 6 homes. Four were fixer uppers and two were brand new. The brand new homes still required landscaping and all kinds of things to transform a builder's box into a home. The downside of brand new is that they are generally in barren new subdivisions of cookie cutter homes with no trees.

I liked the older reno'd homes better than the brand new ones but and this is a major issue, one must be young, energetic and patient to tackle such projects.. Either that or have a bottomless pit of money to hire someone to do all the work before you move in.
July 6, 2014 at 5:47am     
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Allison Capps added 1 photo to ideabook: Allison Capps's Ideas
   Comment   July 6, 2014
Allison Capps added 3 photos to ideabook: Allison Capps's Ideas
   Comment   July 6, 2014
Allison Capps added 4 photos to ideabook: Allison Capps's Ideas
   Comment   July 1, 2014
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