bronmary


bronmary added 2 photos to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
   Comment   on Sunday
bronmary added 1 photo to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
   Comment   on Sunday
bronmary added 1 photo to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
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bronmary added 2 photos to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
   Comment   September 10, 2014
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Luke Buckle
Dead horse for ketchup, chook? Cor blimey, this one has me buggered.
March 17, 2014 at 4:11AM     
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maggielou362
Dead Horse goes on a dog's eye.
March 17, 2014 at 4:14AM     
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chookchook2
We have drop bears in the yard instead of raccoons.
March 17, 2014 at 8:15AM     
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okdokegal
Blue Heeler....

Loving critter, and great cattle dogs.

Cousin had a half heeler, looked like this but longer legs, and she was one great cattle dog; they are not a city/apartment dog, they need room to run and they want to WORK.
March 17, 2014 at 9:16PM     
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okdokegal
marmite is but a weak pretender. Vegemite Rules, Marmite drools!
March 17, 2014 at 9:25PM     
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woodjay
Agree Fiona. Australians like to pretend they live in a climate that doesn't get cold so houses are not built for the minus degree nights and mornings.. In the new estates especially the houses are squeezed together with no eaves, often double storey that rely on a huge amount of energy for heating and cooling.. Designs that are energy efficient are needed.
August 27, 2014 at 12:28AM     
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carthiefintexas
I look at pictures of American homes and they seem so much more physically solid. Is it because the walls are thicker, and properly insulated? I don't know. As well the finishing seems to be infinitely better. For example in Australia (here) with verandah posts they are usually just a thin wood post with metal bracing exposed or a cheap plastic cover and the top is wider where it meets than the support beam. In America they seem to be sizeable, finished off well, and integrated. Another thing that is unfortunately endemic here, is so many houses when adding an extension (usually just a box plonked on the back of an home) seem to end up looking the same - open plan, big spaces, hard edges white soulless kitchen. I've always admired how homes in US look interesting - it's the mix of the build, the internal finishing (skirting boards perhaps) and the very different personal stylings. When I see yet another article describing a sympathetic extension, and there is nothing but gyprock, metal window frames and tiles, I wonder, 'THAT was your vision!'
August 27, 2014 at 2:58PM     
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PRO
Daniel J Burke
To reference comments by "carthiefintexas" it seems to me that many of the homes in the US (as shown on Houzz-US) are architect designed, as are many of the renovations, restorations and additions whereas here in Australia the cost of an architect alone has been a significant stumbling block for home-owners so the humble carpenter or "builder" has been behind the design, or has worked in conjunction with the home-owner to come to a solution that has less style and efficiency than perhaps was the intention.

It is my view (and I can feel the stones flying my way already) that many builders in Australia have little or no design ability and are rather better at problem solving than designing built solutions. Of course many are exceptionally good at what they are supposed to do - build homes. Any client with higher than average incomes seem more likely to engage an architect and thereby end up with a more efficient stylish solution.

Our domestic architecture has an interesting and unique history and it's worth reading up on earlier writers like Robin Boyd - "We need better architecture and planning: more imaginatively exciting, more involving, more our own" - to expand the view of why the differences between building styles exist. In Boyd's time many home plans were created by back-room architects or town planners to meet the needs of suburbs rather than individuals hence repetition and small houses, of which he said, "a five-roomed cottage... different from its neighbours by a minor contortion of window or porch - its difference significant to no one but himself."

Many contemporary building designs reference architectural style from Europe in the 1940s-60s but can enjoy the greater benefits of better materials and engineering though still end up as a cold almost industrial vision which points to the fact that teams of people often design better houses than individuals - a cold impersonal building or space may just need an "interior" designer's touch as well as the architect's viewpoint.

Some of the history of the "heavier" look of construction and finishing in America that you mention is nowhere better referenced than in this book: Bungalow Nation, Diane Maddex & Alexander Vertikoff
August 28, 2014 at 6:16AM     
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chookchook2
I remember when my son was young, we stopped at a playground for him to play. Hubby and I went to the car to get out the picnic stuff, and son stepped off the top to go follow us, about 9 ft off the ground, and fell on his face. Never mind using the ladder...
August 26, 2014 at 8:07PM     
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bronmary added 1 photo to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
   Comment   September 9, 2014
bronmary added 3 photos to ideabook: bronmary's Ideas
   Comment   September 9, 2014
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