Helene Cloutier


Helene Cloutier bookmarked an ideabook

Budget Beach House: A Trailer Gets Ready for Summer Fun

Punchy prints and colors star in a creative approach to Jersey Shore living Full Story
     Comment   August 4, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
photoeve
Some nice ideas!
July 29, 2014 at 5:12PM     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
shannoo
This is fantastic! I live near Lake Erie, in Ohio, I dream of a cottage or trailer near the water so that I may do EXACTLY what was done here! Impressive, way to get that relaxation vibe going on!
August 13, 2014 at 3:39PM   
Sign Up to comment
Helene Cloutier bookmarked an ideabook

My Houzz: New Life and Style for a 1976 Airstream

Taking a pass on RV standards, the new owner of this 1976 Ambassador Airstream looked to flexible furniture and clean, organized spaces Full Story
     Comment   August 4, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Ted Foureagles
Jennifer: Until Jordan answers, I'll ring in on my similar Airstream project. I paid $3,000 for mine in 1999 when it was in nice shape, and that was a good deal at the time. The last similar one that I saw a few years ago was offered for $8,800. Renovation cost can of course vary wildly. I'd guess that if I were a contractor asked to take a typical Airstream to the level that Jordan has achieved, I might bid it at about $12,000, though I could well lose my ass on it. Airstreams are tricky -- aluminum walls and hardly any straight lines.

Airstreams from the '70s are not well insulated. There's about an inch of fiberglass batt everywhere, and considerable thermal bridging at the structural bows. The reflective exterior actually helps keep solar heat out, but it doesn't help enough. Mine is in the Blue Ridge foothills of South Carolina where the climate is quite moderate. I seldom close it up and run the A/C, but often have to bail out on warmer days. Last winter when it got down to 4 degrees, the water bottle on my bedside table froze. The fresh water lines in an Airstream run adjacent to the forced-air heat duct, which is above the floor, and so keeping the furnace in good working order is crucial to keeping the water thawed. It can be a problem with the old propane furnace because few people are willing to accept the liability of working on the old things.

And it's much so with many of the fixtures & appliances in any RV. They're just complex, often with 12 volt, 110 volt and propane operating modes, or complex schemes for the plumbing, etc. And they're necessarily compact and rugged for travel. You might be shocked at the price of a 3-way RV refrigerator -- I sure was.

I might have a total of $6,000 in my '71 Airstream so far, but am far from done with it -- maybe another 4 grand to go. That's not terrible for a house that I've lived in off & on for the past 15 years. The people for whom I design houses pay that much in tax on them each year.

}}}}
4 hours ago     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Jennifer Cook
Thanks for all of the information Ted. !!
3 hours ago   
Sign Up to comment
Helene Cloutier bookmarked an ideabook

Houzz Tour: Meet a Home Made With Minivan Parts

Sawn-off car roofs for the siding, windows popped out of van doors ... this California home is as resourceful as it is beautiful Full Story
     Comment   August 4, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Kristen Roberts
I know the minivan parts are the hook, but it's that poplar waste on the first floor that really catches my eye...brilliant.
August 12, 2014 at 8:52PM     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
roxieks
Becky this is just a wonderful ideabook and if Karl has spare time he can build me one of these, love it!!!
August 13, 2014 at 3:44PM   
Sign Up to comment
Helene Cloutier is following Peter Merante
August 4, 2014
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™