htempo


htempo added 1 photo to ideabook: htempo's ideas
   Comment   last Wednesday
htempo added 1 photo to ideabook: htempo's ideas
   Comment   April 6, 2014
htempo added 3 photos to ideabook: htempo's ideas
   Comment   April 2, 2014
htempo added 1 photo to ideabook: htempo's ideas
   Comment   March 30, 2014
htempo bookmarked an ideabook

Grow a Kitchen Garden in 16 Square Feet

Got a sunny 4-by-4 space? You can make meals more interesting with your own vegetables and herbs Full Story
     Comment   March 30, 2014
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diannthusdesigns
you can put the seeds down in early spring, or young plants after the last freeze
April 2, 2014 at 4:04pm   
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hck72
Marigolds aren't just there to brighten the patch up they are essential if you are looking to try and limit the use of chemical sprays to deter unwanted pests. Marigolds attract beneficial mini beasts (hover flies, lady birds etc) who then in turn eat the aphids etc There are other beneficial flowers that do the same job if you aren't so keen on vibrant orange. Chamomile, daisy, flowering onion garlic, sunflowers amongst others do the job too. Leave nettles growing wild if you can as this is where ladybirds live. Have fun and hope this helps!
Hannah Keegan Garden Design (UK)
April 2, 2014 at 11:10pm     
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Advice on Canyon Farming From L.A.'s Vegetable Whisperer

See how a screened garden house and raised beds help an edible garden in a Los Angeles canyon thrive Full Story
     Comment   March 30, 2014
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dreamdoctor
Also do not use treated lumber in or near water - the reason it does not rot is because it is poisonous to life. Railroad ties count as treated lumber - any form of treatment. If using reclaimed wood older than say thirty years check it for lead content if it has any remnants of paint on it. If you are planting next to a structure that is over 30 years old (or if there was ever a structure there that is now "gone") check the soil for lead - the plants will absorb it. By the by - if you are in a dry area consider using stone mulch - a "trick" I learned in Arkansas - went back after almost thirty years and the plants are still doing fine (unattended). Planting next to a side walk or the like has some of the same benefits.
April 1, 2014 at 10:18am   
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boohoo789
I really like the idea of screening in a small vegetable garden when the critters are taking over. Thanks for the idea!
April 8, 2014 at 12:39pm     
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10 Things to Discuss With Your Contractor Before Work Starts

Have a meeting a week before hammers and shovels fly to make sure everyone’s on the same page Full Story
     Comment   March 30, 2014
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Reno It Home Renovations
Im glad the article helped.
April 7, 2014 at 8:49pm   
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a194721
Good ideas
April 10, 2014 at 9:13pm   
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htempo added 4 photos to ideabook: htempo's ideas
   Comment   March 23, 2014
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How to Harvest Rainwater for Your Garden

Conserve a vital resource and save money by collecting stormwater for irrigation in a barrel or tank Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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chookchook2
He he. Happy Easter to all.
Yesterday at 7:47am     
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chocolizard
I very happily installed an old olive oil barrel under a downspout of my garage. I was raised so I would have pressure, had an overflow and a tap at the bottom, all ready! After a month of using my beautiful barrel on assorted veggies and house plants the turned yellow and died..... Unfortunately I then realize that my neighbor's black walnut tree overhangs my roof, so that even though it was at least 20 foot away there was enough detritus to make the water tea colored. My poor plants watered with black walnut tree juice, sigh..
Moved the barrel to my house roof and all is good now.
You should check out Bermuda if you want to see interesting water collection. Every house is required to have a collection system and large cisterns. It gives the whole island a unique appearance.
I believe the roofs are made of limestone and they have been collecting rain water for 400 years! Check out this video it has lots of information and some great photos.
9 hours ago     
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How to Build a Greener Driveway

New project for a new year: Install a permeable driveway to keep pollutants out of water sources and groundwater levels balanced Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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Tara Framer
Ok... It's time to do my driveway... I'm in Westchester county -- in a suburb of NYC -- and I'm still looking for a paving contractor who does permeable or other Eco-friendly driveways, but there don't seem to be any in my area. Please respond if you know of any paving companies in the NY tri-state area who offer 'green' paving. Thanks!
last Wednesday at 8:17pm   
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Sidonia
Hi Tara. I know of MPS Paving Systems Australia who do beautiful natural stone permeable driveways all over the world. I'm not sure who their contractors are in NY area but you could contact them and find out: www.mpspaving.com.au. Hope this helps!
last Wednesday at 8:23pm   
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How to Replace Your Lawn With a Garden

New project for a new year: Lose the turfgrass for energy savings, wildlife friendliness and lower maintenance Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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chookchook2
We Have more beds than lawn in the front yard. It is not less work! All plants need trimming or dividing at some time of the year. Weeding needs doing, no matter what you do for mulch. with mulch it is less often. Takes the same amount of water, for better result, in a heatwave. That is why we did it. I caution people who are ageing in place, to make sure you only have to reach the length of your arm to every plant, and weed. That means lots of paths. Paving should be nonslip and smooth with no trip hazards. Raise your beds where possible. Paying a lawn mower might be your easiest option if you're 80. Paying someone to weed is very expensive per hour.
March 25, 2014 at 3:21am   
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donnatu
I'd love to remove the grass from my lawn but I don't know what to put in its place. Half the yard is a slope, not extremely steep, but it would require some kind of stepping pavers if there were no other way to get up it when walking on it. I don't want the native grass/boulder/gravel look because my home is a Tudor cottage. My grass is pretty well established so I don't have to water often, but it does have to be mowed and edged. Houzz, please show more pics of landscaping slopes so I can figure out what to do!
March 25, 2014 at 10:38am   
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Grow a Beautiful Garden With Ecofriendly Greywater

Reducing home water waste means lower bills and a healthier planet. Here's how to set up a greywater home irrigation system that can help Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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victoran
So glad people are using grey water. My dad used washing machine and kitchen sink water to water his yard 60 years ago.
March 27, 2014 at 7:06pm     
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kat sabine
We're big fans of grey water in the drought southwest, but last summer I killed off a bunch of well-established shade bushes when my hose from the washer was in my side yard and the water was too hot. It burned the roots of my plants and I've had to start over! now I use it to green up the local grass we can't seem to get rid of. For years, I've had a hose off my air conditioner as well to drip into my sweet potato vines.
March 30, 2014 at 10:58pm     
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10 Easy Edibles for First-Time Gardeners

Focus on these beginner-friendly vegetables, herbs, beans and salad greens to start a home farm with little fuss Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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chrisinky
My boss says that used coffee grounds around her potatoes keep the potato bugs off of them. She also uses stove ashes as a sort of fertilizer. She plants everything according to date/moon/Farmer's Almanac every year and her results are usually really good. I've also heard that human hair clippings around a garden will keep the deer away. I've known people to ask a hairdresser to collect a day or two's worth in a bag for them.
April 9, 2014 at 11:14am   
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rachiti
Hair is best if it's not freshly washed. When I was young (we had a garden in the country among our farm crops) we used marigolds planted at the end of each row and human hair collected from brushed over the course of the year and kept in a baggie until use...the point is to keep human smell near the plants even when you're not around. Time for me to dig up all those garden memories though as we're attempting our first in-ground planting this year (fingers crossed).
April 10, 2014 at 12:43am   
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How to Farm Your Parking Strip

Get an up-close look at a thriving street-side edible garden, one of many sprouting up in Seattle Full Story
     Comment   March 23, 2014
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Curt D'Onofrio
@waffel , "Buy what you must, grow the rest and exchange with locals" -> Agreeing. Our locals are our neighbors. Our cherry tomatto plant produces way to much. We share them whomever wants them. We know it's not much, but we try to share, otherwise, they are going to go to waste...and that's not an acceptable answer to us
last Sunday at 9:24pm   
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carolynlm
I've seen these parking strip vegetable gardens in my mom's Seattle neighborhood. Great idea! I'd love to do it on my Castro Valley parking strip but it would end up feeding the deer before we humans could get anything.
last Tuesday at 2:49pm   
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