jennyjolley


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jennyjolley added 1 photo to ideabook: Outdoor Space
   Comment   April 10, 2014
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Great Ways to Dress a Bay Window

If you’re hemming and hawing over curtains and shutters — or nothing at all — these bay window treatment ideas can help Full Story
     Comment   April 10, 2014
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Sigrid
@Horizon

Yes, it helps me see that the unused shutters in my basement are going to stay there. Thank you, I keep thinking that unused shutter + need for window treatment = shutters on windows, but you'd made me see that all it does not.
19 hours ago   
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francieo
: )
14 hours ago   
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10 Great Outdoor Chill Zones

Whether you have a huge poolside deck or a sliver of a patio, these ideas will kick stress to the curb all summer long Full Story
     Comment   April 10, 2014
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mmjmurphy
My cushions are sunbrella but my small decorative pillows are bold prints sprayed with Thompson Waterseal (fabric seal) going onto the third summer they stay dry, and keep vivid colours in the West Coast BC rain, humidity , hot sunny. Good fabric and outdoor foam is worth every penny for durability.
on Monday at 3:51pm   
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yogapaws
I love my patio furniture from Home Depot. I watch the birds... and sometimes a big cat.
51 minutes ago   
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Contractor Tips: Top 10 Home Remodeling Don'ts

Help your home renovation go smoothly and stay on budget with this wise advice from a pro Full Story
     Comment   April 4, 2014
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shellemm
It's hard to believe a year and a half has gone by since I first commented on this article. Here's an update...

As I said, I spent over 200 hours researching, purchasing and delivering all the light fixtures, sinks, toilets, faucets and bathroom fittings because we wanted a specific look (builder knew this before the digging began, he'd already built a house for us). I checked carefully that everything was from a reputable dealer and covered under warranty -- before you jump on that. This extended to all bathroom fittings, stained glass windows, wood-burning fireplace, and a stone fireplace surround/mantel. We had to do all of this or else settle for the exact same product as every other home in our small town which is 300 km from the nearest city. I made sure that every item was labelled and organized by room in the basement, long before it was needed.

The project was slated to take 5 months. It took 8. Weeks went by when absolutely nothing was done on site and we were told it was because a drywaller had broken his hand. All of the drywalling was done in a rush, and the painting in a week -- we discovered that leftover primer and paint (wrong colours) from other jobs were being used, and we ended up ordering the paint ourselves to get the right colours.

Okay, so it took three months longer than expected, but we finally moved in at the end of 2012. Then we discovered that water lines had been installed backwards; kitchen cabinets were not done, there were gaps in the cabinet trim where the cut ends did not fit together; the dishwasher had not been "completely connected" (floods on kitchen floor); they had installed the blower in the fireplace but no vents; several window frames had not been painted at all; there were two different colours of trim paint, often on the same door or wall; the medicine cabinets had been installed directly above the sinks, leaving too little room for the faucets and useful only for people 5'2" and under; the compression fittings under the toilets were never secured and neither were the water lines to my bathroom sink (more water on the floors). My husband took over 400 photos of the drywall -- lumps, holes, ripples, non-square joints, uneven ceilings -- and paint -- window frames with none, doors ruined by heavy roller marks with dust and fibres stuck in the paint. Two professionals (a contractor, a painter) have been stunned that the painters wanted 17,000$ for a bad job on a 2000 sq ft house. Again, a one-line quote in our contract, non-negotiable, according to the builder. The painters did come back for one day to apply second coats to a few rooms and finish a few windows, but they left several items unfinished and we never saw them again.

Did I mention that the builder has never set foot back on the property since the inspector's visit? I'm sure he knew that things had gone badly wrong. Our first house had been so wonderfully done, in five months, with the builder on site pretty much every day. My only guess is that because he was doing two other million dollar+ projects at the same time, ours was bottom of the list.

We've paid to have the drywall above the fireplace ripped out and the vents installed. We've re-painted rooms. We doubt anything can be done about the multiple and obvious drywall flaws. We've repaired most plumbing problems ourselves. I'm mortified when people come inside to see the house and ask "who was your builder, again?" and then shake their heads. I was shattered, because we'd had such a great rapport with this builder and from the outside, our house is spectacular. His subcontractors made a dog's dinner of the inside and at ridiculous costs -- and he's not acknowledging this. So how does this end? Lawyers, a lost friendship, a tarnished reputation, and many anxiety attacks. Please, people, get every single cost itemized, ask lots of questions about subcontractors, check the site at the end of the day as much as possible and be wary.
March 30, 2014 at 4:47pm     
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llhelm
I have never done a remodel large or small after 20 years owning 2 separate homes. My current home needs both bathrooms renovated, and I have some ideas for enlarging and changing the space. I've been putting off doing any more than reading articles and visiting showrooms for the past year. It seems with each article I read I'm more terrified of ending up with inferior work or materials and not knowing what is going on. Guess I'll live with my 1963 bathrooms awhile longer.
on Tuesday at 8:29pm     
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jennyjolley added 1 photo to ideabook: jennyjolley's ideas
   Comment   April 4, 2014
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How to Grow Your Own Peaches and Nectarines

Make gardening a little sweeter with these juicy fruits, which you can eat after plucking or preserve for later Full Story
     Comment   April 4, 2014
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stephen
You Don't need two peaches, but apples and pears need different varieties for pollination. In maine, peaches are easy to grow, although we only get a crop about half the years.
March 30, 2014 at 2:09pm   
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elisesutton
my solo nectarine tree produces beautiful fruit but this year I am spraying for fruit fly
March 31, 2014 at 4:19pm   
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Key Measurements to Help You Design Your Kitchen

Get the ideal kitchen setup by understanding spatial relationships, dimensions and work zones Full Story
     Comment   April 2, 2014
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divinemrsm
Honestly, I think it's just semantics...an attempt to transition one phrase into the other. After reading the houzz article describing 'work zones', it could just as easily describe my 'work triangle' kitchen. I Dishwasher & trash next to sink, check. Landing areas next to major appliances: check. Large island to keep guests a bay: check.....

I live in a small town filled with older homes. I know few people who upgrade their kitchens to look like the glam-fabulous photos here on houzz. Most people I know don't ever get around to kitchen remodeling and just make do with the old.

Another thing: I read that kitchens have come a long way because all the architects used to be all men and they seldom spent time in a kitchen, therefore kitchens weren't 'user friendly'. Once women came on to the scene, their input helped kitchens evolve into rooms that function well and are family gathering places.
on Monday at 9:32am     
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Studio Z Architecture
I don't have time to read all the other comments, so maybe someone has already said this, but I think it's a good idea to have the sink and the cooktop/range on the same run of cabinets, so that they are not separated by a walkway. This makes prep and cleanup easier and safer, since no one can walk between the chef and the sink while the chef is trying to drain pasta.
on Tuesday at 12:17pm     
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jennyjolley added 2 photos to ideabook: Outdoor Space
   Comment   April 2, 2014
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   Comment   April 2, 2014
jennyjolley added 11 photos to ideabook: 1200 N. Orem House
   Comment   April 1, 2014
jennyjolley added 3 photos to ideabook: Outdoor Space
   Comment   April 1, 2014
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   Comment   April 1, 2014
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What to Know Before Refinishing Your Floors

Learn costs and other important details about renewing a hardwood floor — and the one mistake you should avoid Full Story
     Comment   April 1, 2014
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friedmarc
You can spot repair the areas where the finish has worn off. If the wood has stain, I would find a good furniture touch up and repair man. That individual will know how to fix the color. If you know what the original finish was, I would use the same product over the repair, whether it is or isn't stained. That way if the color is off a little it should age with exposure to direct sunlight.
Without seeing the floor, obviously their are variables. For the most part, surface the bad spots with #120 paper unless scratches are really deep. If so try #100, then #80 if needed. Again if you start with #80 then go to #100, #120. The higher the grit sandpaper you use the better from the get go. That isn't always possible.
The rule for repairs is, less is better. Depending on the size of the repair and finish used, if you can purchase that product in an aerosol can , you're way ahead of the game. Sometimes you can get "witness lines" when repairing a polyurethane finish.
You can reduce solvent based polyurethanes with acetone. You will never see that on the can. Thinner coats with acetone will dry faster even if you have to apply more coats. When working with polyurethane or varnish use multiple thin coats, not a few heavy coats.
Where old meets new, you can sometimes get witness lines. This does not refer to the difference in color. If you have ever seen a clear coat lift off of wood or an automotive finish, that's what I'm talking about. Typically whiteish in color. If you sand smoothly where the two surfaces meet this shouldn't be an issue,
As far as putty's go, they make an epoxie based putty in many colors to match the background color of the wood. I purchase these at my Sherwin Williams commercial division store. You might try Woodcraft or a store of that type. Obviously these get applied first and surfaced at the same time as the floor.
The biggest issue after these spot repairs are done is, will the sheen of the floor match the sheen of the existing floor. The way to solve this problem is wax. Wax is often used to even the sheen and is a legitimate solution to your problem.
Worst case, wax and buff the entire floor with a commercial buffer. Make sure the new finish is completely cured. Follow the directions on the can religously. Have patience.
Furniture repair guys and gals often wax table top repairs to even the sheen so they don't have to refinish the whole table. Your floor is a big table. I'd wait till the weather in your area is above 65 degrees if you can. A little wax applied properly should give your floor a new appearance and the wax offers additional protection.
I hope this information is helpful. Thanks for asking.
March 27, 2014 at 7:41pm     
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PRO
Kelley's Wood Floors
I will have to agree that many points in this article are relative to most homeowners, and there are many good points and questions in rebuttal as well. We've been refinishing wood floors in the Central TX area for 69 years now and have run into so many scenarios that it's unreal!

Every floor is completely different from the next, so each floor requires some sort of adjustment in the sanding/finishing process. Knowing how to adjust your techniques and equipment to accommodate the needs of a particular floor takes many years of experience and trial and error. This is not to say that certain jobs cannot be done by a diy'er. Just know that there can be several factors involved that takes a pro to recognize before and during the process of sanding/finishing. These factors can include moisture/water/termite damage that isn't obvious at first, cupping (which takes more aggressive but careful sanding methods), ability to determine how much more sanding the floor can withstand, etc…

I've posted some before and after pics of a certain job that took a very delicate touch. This is the original quartersawn white oak floor in a 1916 home in Temple, TX. It had been covered with carpet for the last 30 years. Once we removed the carpet, we discovered a great deal of cupping, some of which had buckled the floor as much as 2-3 inches off the subfloor. We also discovered that the floor was only 5/16"-3/8" in thickness with a topside of about 1/8". Our first move was to moisture test the floor because it was cupped so much, and sure enough it had high moisture content (up to 20% in some areas). Next step was to figure out why. We went to the basement to discover that the entire underside of the subfloor, including the floor joists was dripping wet due to a/c condensation. This was only visible through a crawlspace. It took 2-3 weeks of running de-humidifiers once the a/c was repaired to completely dry out the crawlspace and reduce the moisture content of the oak enough to comfortably sand it. If you sand a floor that contains too much moisture, it will just cup again. This was a risk that could not be taken.

Although this floor is the exception, a diy homeowner may have possibly just starting sanding this floor without knowing the extent of the moisture content or the delicate nature in which sanding needed to occur as to not sand completely through the topside.

We absolutely could not use our drum sanders on this floor, so we used our Trio's throughout the entire sanding process. It is stained with Duraseal English Chesnut, and finished with two coats of satin water-based polyurethane.
on Monday at 8:21am   
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jennyjolley added 1 photo to ideabook: jennyjolley's ideas
   Comment   April 1, 2014
jennyjolley added 1 photo to ideabook: Outdoor Space
   Comment   April 1, 2014
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Bathroom Workbook: 12 Things to Consider for Your Remodel

Maybe a tub doesn’t float your boat, but having no threshold is a no-brainer. These points to ponder will help you plan Full Story
     Comment   April 1, 2014
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royalpayne
Yes, by all means, safety bars. And if not now, at least the blocking for them to be added later. In my 'Your new house' portfolio I plan to pass on, I have visually recorded every improvement we have done. Down to the studs pictures of blocking, electrical runs, plumbing, HVAC ducting, floor joist directions, types of underlayments under the hardwood and tile upgrades, insulation R factors and brands..... In short, every thing I wish had been passed on to me. Oh, and owners manuals of all appliances currently in the house. With their date of purchase and all warranty paperwork.
last Friday at 12:27pm   
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jensdesigntime
love your art!
on Wednesday at 9:15pm   
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Great Design Plant: Blackfoot Daisy for Prettier Dry Ground

Don’t let its delicate looks fool you. This ground cover can survive extreme cold and heat, and with little water to boot Full Story
     Comment   March 31, 2014
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tsudhonimh
Denise - the Zone is the COLDEST place they can survive.
March 26, 2014 at 5:05pm   
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juliewa8
Does anyone know if bunnies like to eat the tender new growth on this plant? Could it possibly be rabbit-proof?? Everything I've planted with the exception of cactus and agave have been mowed down within days of planting, even when there are established plants of the same variety (here when we bought the place a year ago in Lake Havasu City, AZ). Suggestions for rabbit-resistant ornamentals are appreciated!
April 6, 2014 at 6:42pm   
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Great Design Plant: Sunrose Dazzles on Dry Slopes

Abundant blooms and attractive foliage make this plant a welcome sight in sunny, well-drained spots Full Story
     Comment   March 31, 2014
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rakujudy
Hill lake
March 2, 2014 at 2:19pm   
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Trilliums Landscaping & Horticulture
In western N.Y. (zones 5&6) they may be winter hardy, but they don't survive our cold & very wet springs, unless they have perfect drainage the roots rot out.
March 2, 2014 at 6:11pm   
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jennyjolley added 1 photo to ideabook: jennyjolley's ideas
   Comment   March 31, 2014
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Dream Spaces: 12 Beautiful White Kitchens

Snowy cabinets and walls speak to a certain elegance, while marble counters whisper of luxury Full Story
     Comment   March 30, 2014
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mchemariav
Cocina
on Wednesday at 8:14pm   
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marquest
I love them all. I have remodeled 3 homes in my lifetime and the first thing I do with the kitchens is make them all white. Nothing says clean to me like a white kitchen. I am a clean person so keeping a white kitchen clean is easy. Dark kitchen especially around my food does not remind me of clean food. Where you prepare your food should be clean and clinical.
18 hours ago     
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Explore Your Garden Personality: The Romantic

Delve into a sensual garden design that sings of love and speaks to the senses Full Story
     Comment   March 24, 2014
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Liz Moultroup
Beautiful pink & purples -garden
March 14, 2014 at 5:57pm   
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chookchook2
All you green thumbed people, St Patricks Day party on Cake Tins thread

http://www.houzz.com/discussions/875979
March 16, 2014 at 9:31pm   
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12 Key Decorating Tips to Make Any Room Better

Get a great result even without an experienced touch by following these basic design guidelines Full Story
     Comment   March 24, 2014
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PRO
Bowden Carroll Design
Amen to # 5. Who wants to live in a theme park?
on Sunday at 11:11am     
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ceramic artisan
sample.
on Monday at 8:47am   
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