jphennings


jphennings added 5 photos to ideabook: Bathroom Ideas
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jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Garden, Gate, Fence, Cistern Ideas
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How to Install Energy-Efficient Windows

Learn what Energy Star ratings mean, what special license your contractor should have, whether permits are required and more Full Story
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nicky36
I would have like more information on types of windows and advantages and disadvantages. Perhaps more about single hung vs. double hung or something about casement windows. Or, about bay windows. Is one more efficient than another?
2 hours ago   
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AE Building Systems
slrslr, Good windows generally are have u-values below u-0.2 (r-5) and air infiltration rates below .03 cfm/sf. If your supplier can't provide these numbers or if you believe they are lying (which is not uncommon), then look it up on the NFRC website. I hate to use the word lying, and the industry is better than in the past. However, there are still tons of bad sales people who are not only trained to lie, they only want your money and don't care about you. Be cautious, because a home is most often your most valuable asset.

Nicky36, hungs, double hungs and horizontal sliders are always leakier than casements, awnings, tilt and turns. They let air in and out. I don't recommend anything but casements, awnings and tilt/turns.

Guys when it comes to install.... you want to insulate with either expanding foam tape or spray foam and then air seal on both the interior and exterior with high performance tapes. Do not air seal on the exterior sill. That is why you air seal on interior. Don't forget to install a good flashing as well.

If your installer says that foam is enough... in the short run maybe... not in the long run. It is not a long term air seal.
9 minutes ago   
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jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Colors
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How to Pick Your Important Kitchen Appliances

Find the ideal oven, refrigerator, range and more without going nutty — these resources help you sort through your the appliance options Full Story
     Comment   last Friday
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Mary Fisher Knott
When possible, ovens placed side by side are a better solution ergonomically. Not every kitchen has the space for lateral applications.........but it does allow you to access appliances at the proper level for your body type.
October 28, 2013 at 9:55am   
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weber1328
Oven look
January 11, 2014 at 1:40pm   
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How to Find the Right Range for Your Kitchen

Range style is mostly a matter of personal taste. This full course of possibilities can help you find the right appliance to match yours Full Story
     Comment   last Friday
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pbutler111
When I had my idea about putting two 30" ranges side by side, I picked a few manufacturers that I thought we could potentially use and wrote to them, asking if it was possible to have two of their 30" units sitting flush against each other. LG was a resounding NO. (In fact, LG let slip that even though their literature shows their ovens installed into cabinetry, with no space in between, all of their ranges actually require 5" of clearance space on all sides; they admitted the photos were misleading. REALLY misleading!) Thermador also said no, as did Bosch. The only two that said it would be no problem for their ovens were Viking and Blue Star, which was good news for me, as I've been leaning toward Viking. I hope this is somewhat helpful.
June 25, 2014 at 8:32am   
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pbutler111
By the way, this is the exact message from the LG service rep in response to my bewilderment when she said all their ovens require 5" clearance even though none of their ovens are shown with such clearance on their website or in their brochure:

"Dear Mrs. Butler,

Thank you for contacting LG Electronics.

Don’t worry, it’s ok Mrs. Butler. I’m attaching the installation manual of our free standing gas ranges where you can see the clearance necessary. Even there, the picture doesn’t really show any clearance in between cabinets and the range but it is written that 5” are necessary. You can find this under p.6."

In other words -- do as we say, not as we do!
June 25, 2014 at 8:57am   
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The Secret to Pocket Doors' Success

Pocket doors can be genius solutions for all kinds of rooms — but it’s the hardware that makes all the difference. See why Full Story
     Comment   last Thursday
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TAG
gofmiwok: Look at the video that Johnson Hardware provided. It will show you a a way.

Do a little research and check out the various tracks --The video shows a typical cheap track - you can see how thin it is. Even with the better extruded design they make heaver tracks for heavy doors.

I don't normally install the stops and if I must -- say on a bathroom - I only install in on the inside. You can see on the video what a pain it is when everything is nailed together and painted and you have to remove it - you can't get the door out without messing up the frame

The video looks like it would be a solution -- especially if you have the door in the middle of a big wall. To bad I had not seen it earlier. In a short wall -- less that 4' wide .. it may be easier to cut out the whole space and replace with a sheet of drywall. I'm not the best patcher of drywall -- better at the corners.
23 hours ago   
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ProfittCustomHomes
There are many areas of a home in which it pays off big time in the long run to spend a few extra bucks. Pocket door systems are one of them. Foundations, framing and roofing are others but that's a whole different story. The extra expense involved is not only in materials but the skill and knowledge of the tradesmen doing the work.

Typically, you won't find either of those in your average tract or "builders" home. The average buyer doesn't want to spend money on something they can't see. Unfortunately, this scenario is not limited to volume builders. In thirty years of building in an area of significant building activity I have only met a handful of builders/Contractors who understand the difference and care enough to spend the extra money to protect the buyer's long term investment. Pocket doors are just one of the many places where you can pay a little now or a lot later to get something that works well.

TAG mentioned the header. This is a VERY important consideration. If you have a pocket door frame installed originally in the home, there should be a support header above the frame that is NOT touching the pocket door frame other than a few spots where shims and screws were added to stabilize the door frame. If you are adding a new opening or replacing an existing with a larger one, get a competent (meaning meany years in the business with a corresponding list good client referrals) to review the situation AND add the header & install the door.

If it's a non-load bearing wall, the header's only function is to stabilize the door frame. It it is a load bearing wall, considerable care and expertise must be utilized in any modification to prevent serious (and quite possibly dangerous) events from taking place either during or after the construction work. In a mufti-story house if's this is even more of a consideration.

In any pocket door installation, the pocket door frame is not intended to carry the weight of any load from above.

If you can't find a construction expert that you feel comfortable with to make this determination, hire a Professional Structural Engineer to asses the home's suitability for this change. It will cost you a few hundred bucks but could save you tens of thousands (or your life) in the long run.

Correctly installed using good quality hardware, a pocket door is an excellent method of getting the benefits of a closeable door without requiring or giving up room space for the door to open. Someone stated builders hadn't been using them for 60 yrs. That may be true in their specific part of the country, and likely true in any area that you buy a house from a production builder. Any thing that adds a dime that they can't get a dollar for or that takes special skill to include - is not part of their business model. That doesn't mean they haven't been used in custom applications.

And, for special applications, you sometimes have to think outside the box a little bit. If you don't like or want users to have to deal with figuring out how to work the disappearing pocket door hardware, then don't make the door disappear completely. If you have the wall space to work with, put in a larger opening and use exterior hardware like a sliding patio door. If you want a 28" (normally a comfortable bathroom door size) door opening, install a 36" frame and door but install a stop mount in the frame to prevent the door from opening more than the 28" space requirement. This leaves nearly 6 inches to install protruding hardware that makes it easy for anyone to open, close and lock and at a much more reasonable price than the concealed hardware.

The biggest factor is finding someone in your area who is skilled enough to do the job properly. This is NOT a diy project for the homeowner, nor a job for Hank the Handyman. Think of it as surgury. You wouldn't let just anyone cut on you without spending some time finding out if they knew what they were doing...don't you think your house deserves similar con
11 hours ago   
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jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Home Office Ideas
   Comment   last Thursday
jphennings added 3 photos to ideabook: Bathroom Ideas
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jphennings added 2 photos to ideabook: Garden, Gate, Fence, Cistern Ideas
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jphennings bookmarked an ideabook

11 Things to Expect With Your Remodel

Prepare yourself. Knowing what lies ahead during renovations can save your nerves and smooth the process Full Story
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Sims Construction
Jon
Great points some need to be repeated.
Having fun that is sometimes missed.
I will never under estimate how lucky I am still enjoying what I do.

Not every day , week or month I work with the client doing the odd project.
Twice this week ( not the norm) I worked with past clients.
I was asked to help hang blinds as I was on site anyway meeting my HVCA contractor re working another contractors past work.
It was fun even comical as she went ahead and scattered the blinds , pulled old hardware from past blind and curtain installs .
I was also asked to install venting on a garage the other day that was closed in after I build a year and a half ago.
It was a fun break from the normal day.

Bathroom issues
Almost Never in the clients home unless its a total renovation and the house is empty.
On quick short jobs the guys know where the nearest restroom is, 7-11, coffee shop.
Portable restrooms have benefits and negatives.
If the porta potty is in close quarters to the home, bi weekly cleaning or extra deodorant may be an issue.

Reading through the post it would be scary if I thought bad contractors were the norm.
A number of the problems I see are from the contractor not keeping an eye on things or more common the home owner is being the GC.
Being the GC is a responsibly not to be taken lightly.
As the GC it is my duty to do what is the best for the house.
The house will take care of the client.
In turn the client will take care of you.

Keeping the job running smoothly, client happy and secure is the goal.
Trust is the key to success.
last Thursday at 11:09pm   
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goodewyfe
Reading all the horror stories makes me even more nervous about a remodel I want to have done to my condo - kitchen (new counters & sink, flooring, lighting and appliances) as well as bathrooms (new counters, bathtub-shower/lighting and flooring) and the entire place needs painting. This should be a fairly simple job. If anyone knows of a good designer/GC (I prefer to have one firm rather than facing being a mediator between the designer & GC) in the San Gabriel Valley (Eagle Rock/La Crescenta/Pasadena/South Pas/Altadena/Arcadia area), please advise.
4 hours ago   
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jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Lighting
   Comment   last Monday
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Design Workshop: The Lowdown on Colossal Doors

Want to erase the boundary to the outdoors? Here’s what to know about materials, cost, energy efficiency and more Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
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mylenemorris
Toiture véranda
March 16, 2014 at 8:14pm   
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gkmorton
Doors
April 10, 2014 at 10:01pm   
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Design Workshop: Cool Lighting Tricks

We turn you on to pro lighting strategies to highlight features, create intrigue and make the most of indoor and outdoor rooms Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
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Bravehart Building
Great lighting examples. Great article! This detail is mission critical in my view and where clients often gag on the budget, until they really understand the implications of reducing amount and types of illumination.
April 15, 2014 at 1:49pm     
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DSC DesignWorks
I love this article, I have an obsession with lighting fixtures! Adding light fixtures can absolutely transform your room. Plus, there is so many options out there, and they are a great way of reflecting your personality.
June 1, 2014 at 5:17pm     
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Design Workshop: Natural Wood Siding Minus the Maintenance

No need to worry about upkeep when you choose wood that embraces weathering Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
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localpractice
Eric, great article. I've posted a link on my blog www.localpractice.wordpress.com . Letting buildings "wear in" requires a suspension of the traditional concepts of beauty and nobility. Maybe we've all grown a little to accustomed to "day 1" photography. There's merit in letting the material breathe, not only economically but ecologically as well.
May 9, 2014 at 1:26pm     
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jodiee88
Thanks Virgin Heart Sinker Cypress. I'm not sure the species but will ask the supplier. I'm sure it's on our certificate from the mill. I'll let you know. They have just started putting it up and the whole building site smells fantastic. The timber has had an initial application of Quantec wood protection, as advised by the supplier, but will now be left to weather naturally. We are really happy with the result.
May 9, 2014 at 3:29pm     
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jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Colors
   Comment   July 5, 2014
jphennings bookmarked an ideabook

Can You Handle That Fixer-Upper?

Learn from homeowners who bought into major renovation projects to see if one is right for you Full Story
     Comment   July 5, 2014
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ganguli6
Great article, but Houzzer's comments are invaluable! Thanks everybody!!!
last Tuesday at 7:46am     
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Sayra Adams
Wake up! Dreamers. $400 will not get you far. Paint is $28, and up per gallon. We rehabbed a 900 sq ft house recently, and it soaked up thousands. Be realistic!
last Wednesday at 8:51am     
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jphennings added 2 photos to ideabook: Deck Ideas
   Comment   July 5, 2014
jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Deck Ideas
   Comment   July 4, 2014
jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Pool Ideas
   Comment   July 4, 2014
jphennings added 4 photos to ideabook: Colors
   Comment   July 4, 2014
jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Floors
   Comment   July 4, 2014
jphennings added 9 photos to ideabook: Exterior Ideas
   Comment   July 4, 2014
jphennings added 1 product to ideabook: Exterior Ideas
   Comment   July 3, 2014
jphennings added 2 photos to ideabook: Garden, Gate, Fence, Cistern Ideas
   Comment   July 3, 2014
jphennings added 1 photo to ideabook: Deck Ideas
   Comment   July 3, 2014
jphennings added 2 photos to ideabook: Bathroom Ideas
   Comment   July 3, 2014
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