nathan dalzell


Location
bismarck, ND  
nathan dalzell added 4 photos to ideabook: abodes
   Comment   July 20, 2014
nathan dalzell added 1 photo to ideabook: permeable surfaces
   Comment   July 20, 2014
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Switch to a Tankless Water Heater

New project for a new year: Swap your conventional heater for an energy-saving model — and don’t be fooled by misinformation Full Story
     Comment   July 11, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
krakman
How did you install one already? They don't appear to be available yet (?)
June 8, 2014 at 11:36am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
blurino
I mean I have three electric tankless already, but they don't work very well (elements burn out frequently and have to be replaced, l and the flow switch gets clogged up plus the temperature control is not very good). I have three heatworks on order.
June 8, 2014 at 8:47pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Is Radiant Heating or Cooling Right for You?

Questions to ask before you go for one of these temperature systems in your floors or walls (yes, walls) Full Story
     Comment   July 11, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Mariana Pickering (Emu Architects)
@eileenforsyth - I'd tend to agree with @jeanstryker on this
June 2, 2014 at 2:35pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
amiadams
We built our stone home 7 years ago in Montana and have radiant floor heat on the main level. In the bathrooms we ran the heating elements up the wall behind the the towel racks - as well as part way up the shower walls - about 4 1/2 feet. We had initially planned heated towel racks, but due to budget concerns scratched them. Although I wish we had the heated towel racks, the heated walls for towels and showers is a really nice and relatively low cost option.
June 4, 2014 at 9:13am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Add a Murphy Bed

Make a single room serve multiple purposes with a convenient foldaway bed Full Story
     Comment   July 9, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lyrics1967
hnigal, what kind of cabinetry to they have when closed? Do they look like sideboard/buffet or what? I haven't been able to find them. You have a link?
June 7, 2014 at 1:55pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hnlgal
lyrices67 try.....
http://www.innovativesleep.ca
www.wrmattress.com
www.innovativesleep.ca
June 7, 2014 at 7:22pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Stoneware Crocks Strike a Chord

Once just humble pantry items, stoneware containers have become showpieces around the home Full Story
     Comment   July 9, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
catterall
Slipcover look
June 6, 2014 at 4:26am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lannegreenelag
Cabinet on back wall
June 15, 2014 at 3:52pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

The Secret to Pocket Doors' Success

Pocket doors can be genius solutions for all kinds of rooms — but it’s the hardware that makes all the difference. See why Full Story
     Comment   July 9, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Donco Designs
Pocket doors are a great design feature that can help open up a room with limited space. Pocket doors can add style to a room while also providing privacy to an area.
July 21, 2014 at 3:52am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Kamm Architecture
We use either pocket doors or surface mounted doors on exposed tracks, depending on the application. I love the look of the exposed track hardware, but you need clear wall space to the side of the door opening in order to make it work. The door then becomes a design feature. A pocket door essentially disappears when open, so you can create a greater flow of space.
July 21, 2014 at 1:42pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Harvest Rainwater for Your Garden

Conserve a vital resource and save money by collecting stormwater for irrigation in a barrel or tank Full Story
     Comment   July 8, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
paddyboxall
G'day Kathleen,
Why don't you attach a hose to the outlet of your washing machine and let the pump distribute the water as far as the hose travels. I have been doing this for at least 10 years. It is amazing how plants, especially big shrubs thrive with constant watering.
Of course you can re-arrange the hose anywhere you like to water more of your precious plants
El Nino is about to strike in eastern Australia again,where I reside, 80% of the state of Queensland is in drought. Some of it for over two years now. We really know about saving water.
June 18, 2014 at 6:22am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
katelyn1953
I use two rain barrels in tandem on each side of my garage to collect rain water. I connect the barrels in the spring (after the first heavy rain clears the screen covered gutters. Through the spring I am able to collect enough rain water to carry me through into August. We haven't had to worry about droughts here (yet). I am just cheap and can't see paying for potable water that I am going to pour into the dirt. I use a watering can to water my garden, that is feasible because I do square foot gardening in raised beds. I spend about 20 minutes a day watering. That means each plant gets watered every 2-3 days. Because my rain barrels are covered I haven't had any trouble with mosquitoes, as long as lids are replaced, the one time they weren't, mosquito dunks took care of the problem.
June 22, 2014 at 5:48am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Modern Design Captures Valuable Rain

Instead of letting a precious natural resource trickle away, these architectural features make the most of it Full Story
     Comment   July 8, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Nicole Orner
Colorado also has rules against collection, though I understand those are under review. Here in Arizona we have pretty lenient rain water/ grey water laws... the trick is finding rain water to collect. :)
July 31, 2012 at 3:42pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
judithlea
Can't emphasize enough how important it is too keep run off out of bays, lakes, streams and canals. Can't fish or swim in our canal due to run off pollution. Our bay is tidal so the water that reaches there is flushed 2c daily into the ocean (just what the ocean needs). A good start is driveways that incorporate native ground covers w/ pavers or gravel w/ stone or permeable concrete retaining borders.
July 27, 2013 at 6:00am   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Key Measurements to Make the Most of Your Bathroom

Fit everything comfortably in a small or medium-size bath by knowing standard dimensions for fixtures and clearances Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Katherine Floritto
This is definitely the best piece I've read on understanding how a bathroom 'works' in relationship to the plumbing and measurements. Thanks for writing it! We have a very strange (to me) ensuite. Toilet and sink on one wall, shower opposite..so far, so good. But..the Shower doesn't take up the whole wall, so there is a space, as deep as the shower and as tall as the room, about 12" across that does absolutely nothing. Would you recommend installing shelving in it or extending the shower? I think, if we extended the shower, we could put in a tub (I'd like that!). Door is a slider, so no opening/closure to add into the measurements and, on the wall outside the ensuite are 2 7'long closets on either side of the passageway to the bedroom...so I suppose the Bathroom could be extended, if called for... ?? Thanks again
July 20, 2014 at 10:33pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Penny
Just bought my retirement home and am planning on gutting and redoing the only bathroom in the house. As this is the home I plan to age in and I haven't sat down in a tub for at least 10 years, I'm planning on replacing the tub with a shower. This article has a lot of good info for standard dimensions, and I'm looking forward to incorporating some of the design tips the author discusses.
As far as designing with resale in mind, I couldn't care less. I'm going to enjoy my house with features that please me - period. Thanks for the informative article.
last Friday at 2:56am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

8 Ways to Make the Most of Your Laundry Room

These super-practical laundry room additions can help lighten your load Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
litehearted
Here it is almost a year later, and lots of comments still. Laundry is a fact of life. :) Which is why I'm dedicating so much time, effort and money, into making my little laundry area work better for me. I don't mind doing laundry [don't ask me to iron], but I do like it to be streamlined. I've had top loaders and front loaders, and see the merits to both. I've currently purchased new compact front loaders for our condo, which I've opted not to stack. The thing is, I do want them raised off the ground -- Miele appear to be the only ones that have the metal drawers for their compact series, however, I purchased GE. In any case, I do not particular need them the same height...I want the washer raised about 5 inches, and the dryer raised about 15 inches. Then when I pull the stuff out of the dryer, I want to be able to fold it on top of the washer. Above the set, I want a cupboard on either side, one to hold detergent, and the other to with louvred doors to hold our router/internet stuff. In between, a wall mounted drying rack. So I'm having a handyman come out next week to take a look, and we'll see what can be done. Also want to replace the flexible venting ducting for rigid, and create a nice stainless steel backsplash. Will try to remember to post a photo when it's done. Whether you have a closet, or a room, it's worth it to create the right laundry space for your needs. Like kitchens and bathrooms, it's a well used investment.
June 5, 2014 at 9:04am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
le1115le
Save
June 24, 2014 at 8:24pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Key Measurements for a Dream Laundry Room

Get the layout dimensions that will help you wash and fold — and maybe do much more — comfortably and efficiently Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Pat Keaton
I'm building a home. The laundry room has a built in sink/bathing area for my fur babies. A built in ironing board. A broom/storage closet. A closet for clothes to dry & that need pressing & the steamer. I do not like front loading W/D. Mine are top. The front loading makes clothes stink if you don't take the time to clean & dry it really good. I have counter tops to fold clothing. My laundry room will be very nice &user friendly. I like the way it is & for anyone to say why spend the money on that. I say why not? It's my money and we worked very hard for it. My husband DID build his business. So anyone that wants to do it their way and can do it. Go right ahead.
last Wednesday at 6:35pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
churcher
When we renovated our house 15 years ago the laundry was the least important room. We installed 2nd hand cupboards and sink because we ran out of money. I’ve been thinking about fixing it up for years, and now have the money, time and inspiration, so this feature and everyone’s ideas are very timely.
My laundry is spacious, it just needs more functional design and to be made into a pleasant room to work. It’s long and narrow with the top loader (love it), drier and cupboards along one wall and space for the ironing board to remain up on the opposite wall. There’s a back door to the garden and outside clothesline. Living in Sydney, Australia I use the outside line all the time, but I also have the dryer if needed. I plan to put it above the washing machine and get a big new sink. I use it for hand washing, soaking, emptying buckets, washing the big roasting pans, brushes and shoes. I will incorporate more useful cupboards and shelves, from all the ideas here. Thank you for including measurements in metric in your article.
last Thursday at 3:06pm     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Key Measurements to Help You Design Your Dream Bedroom

Learn the dimensions that will help your bed and more fit neatly and comfortably, so you can get a good night’s sleep Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
alives
We live in an older home without A/C, so we leave our windows open at night to cool off. Since our bedroom has five! doors, furniture tends to be under the double hung windows, making them difficult to access to open and close. The room with the bed in the middle of the windows made me think of that.
July 17, 2014 at 11:21am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
annfarr
I solved the small-bedroom problem in my 100-year-plus central-stair colonial by hunting down an antique 3/4 spool bed. Love it!
July 20, 2014 at 8:56pm     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Contractor Tips: Wise Advice for Laundry Room Design

Thinking ahead when installing or moving a washer and dryer can prevent frustration and damage down the road Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Bryan and Lana Rodriguez
Recently, we just moved into our home and the first project is to install a new W/D and rehab our basement laundry room this month. This was perfect information at the right time!!
May 20, 2014 at 10:03pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
abarnhart
Love it
July 3, 2014 at 6:29pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Key Measurements for the Perfect Garage

Get the dimensions that will let you fit one or more cars in your garage, plus storage, mechanical and whatever else you need Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
suzare17
Grandeur de garage
June 29, 2014 at 6:04am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
ProfittCustomHomes
Undoubtedly so!

But, like houses, one person's dream may hold no appeal to the next person who comes along.

I've built wine cellars the size of bedrooms with elaborate cabinetry and chilling systems for wine enthusiasts, $100k kitchens for cooking nuts, $300k backyard makeovers for folks who like to entertain outdoors. These individuals considered these features to be "critical" to their enjoyment of the home.

To most of the people who would be interested in an elaborate garage, features like those above might be considered "ok" if they were already in place when they bought the house, but certainly not warrant the expense of adding them after the fact. But, to someone who's interests like in areas typically associated with a garage, having adequate space to enjoy your hobby is very important.

Frequently these interests also tend to be gender specific. From the feminine perspective it "just a garage, what's the big deal"? But to the guys, it's their place to escape, pursue their passions, entertain their buddies.

And as in all other areas of living space, careful planning can make a huge difference in the enjoyment level after the money is spent. Those few extra feet those guidelines add may make 10% difference in the cost of the structure - and 100% difference in the enjoyment level of the user.
June 30, 2014 at 3:22am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Your Guide to a Smooth-Running Construction Project

How to save time, money and your sanity when building new or remodeling Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Pamela Foster & Associates, Inc.
I just took exception to your statement: "Unregulated industries, like residential construction, are not noted for their promotion of compliance and regulatory self policing." I consider my job to be direction of the subcontractors on any project I have; that means that I have to be knowledgeable in all trades, or develop a relationship with subcontractors that I KNOW want the best and want repeat business with my company. They know if they do it correctly, I will continue to use them. If they don't, I demand they return and make it right before they get paid. However, my approach is a little different than most, as I only take on one project at a time, and am on the jobsite at least once a day, sometimes twice. This prevents mistakes from happening that have been covered up. Project management should be any GC's first priority; management means I oversee all aspects of the job on a daily basis.
July 3, 2014 at 6:50pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mrsdextraze
Cut out joist..... What good contractor would do this?????
July 21, 2014 at 9:27pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Landscaping Tricks to Manage Stormwater Runoff

Help rainwater absorb slowly back into the earth with paving grids, gravel beds and other porous systems Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
patternsinnature
Great discussion here. I have a couple observations. I like gravel and use gravel as it is cost effective, attractive, and at least somewhat permeable. However, there is no getting around the fact that it is harder to maintain than a more solid surface like stone or concrete pavers. I don't think landscape fabric as an underpayment does much at all to deter weeds, since weeds mostly blow in and start form seeds. The only time I think landscape fabric is helpful is if the site has very clayey soil. In that case a separation between the layers can be helpful.

Hand weeding or a flame torch are good ways of dealing with weeds in gravel, especially when weeds are pulled or scorched when young. I suspect, however, that a lot of gravel is maintained in a relatively weed free state with regular applications of Casaron and Round-up. Using these nasty chemicals kinda negates the environmental good being done by selecting a more permeable paving material.

I know there have been other discussions of rain gardens on Houzz, but this ideabook would be an ideal place to mention them as part of an overall strategy for dealing with stormwater in an aesthetically pleasing, environmentally beneficial manner. Rain gardens turn stormwater problems into assets!
December 28, 2013 at 10:11am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
patternsinnature
That should say underlayment, not "underpayment", above. There is No advantage to underpayment, that I can see ;)
December 28, 2013 at 10:12am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Create Garden Mystery With a Zigzag Path

Foster intrigue by setting garden paths at angles ‘yatsuhashi’-style Full Story
     Comment   July 7, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Grounded
Thanks so much, Trilliums. We worked on that project for three years, and it does my heart good to hear such nice words about our project. Funny, but I tend to design in orthogonal and more modern lines, and I have been pushing myself to incorporate sweeping curves to mix it up recently. I do think the site often lends itself to one design language or another. It's all about the genius loci, and uncovering what feels right, I think. We used the "zigzag" (as we ignorantly called the yatsuhashi) throughout the site. Here it is in a stair...
April 29, 2014 at 3:06pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Trilliums Landscaping & Horticulture
Grounded what makes your design amazing is how everything ties in together & makes the entire space greater than the sum of its parts. I would have tried to soften the lines and downplay all the angles - and I would have been wrong, you made the right choices for this site.
April 29, 2014 at 3:57pm     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Ditch the Ordinary Ditch: Create a Realistic Dry Creek Bed

Here’s how to turn your water runoff system into an eye-catching accent for your landscape Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
diyer59
I love this look and have incorporated it into almost every garden I've owned. Depending on the garden, I used it as a small accent or a larger focal point. One way people go wrong with this look is using the same sized rocks, not using enough of them, or making straight lines--all not found in nature--so it looks much too contrived. Different sized rocks, squiggly banks, being generous with the amount of rocks used is a must. Do it right to get the "look".
July 16, 2014 at 8:12am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Spring Creek Aquatic Concepts
peggysueh If you narrow your channel, the sediments will not accumulate. Find a clean spot along your current channel and use that for your guide. No sediment = no weeds. It takes an understanding of hydrology to deal with this issue. We are Biologists. Houzz didn't allow us to use that title so we went with the next best thing.

As far as channel shape ideas, this project discusses what real streams look like...
July 16, 2014 at 10:56am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Get Along With Less Lawn — Ideas to Save Water and Effort

Ditch the mower and lower your water bill while creating a feast for the eyes with diverse plantings and gathering places Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
nijuki
Nice bbq setup
April 30, 2014 at 2:11am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Windo VanGo
Check out more ways you can save money on energy and water bills this summer!


July 15, 2014 at 8:23am   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

8 Rot-Resistant Woods for Your Outdoor Projects

No need for chemical treatments on your deck or pergola. These woods stand up to weather, insects and time beautifully on their own Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
desertspring
I originally chose Western red cedar for a porch renovation, but chose pt for the stairs. How is the choice for the stairs made, when the stairs get so much more wear, and one wishes to accomodate that, but not have the fading of the different poducts at different rates? Does anyone find cedar is as soft as it is claimed to be?
June 25, 2014 at 7:16am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
RollingPlanter
Desertspring,

Cedar is a very very soft wood it is great for making shakes and siding. As a structural and walkable surface wood it is too soft and brittle. This is not to say you might find pieces that can be used for either location. As a rule, pine, fir, hemlock and spruce are better choices for strength and durability for stairs, joists and walking surfaces. (in the pacific northwest I have seen many decks made of cedar, it is not an issue of best material, I think its a choice what is abundantly available. I don't think your joist are made of cedar if so, I would consult an architect or engineer immediately. This could be a hazard in the wait).

Southern Yellow Pine is more preferred, it many means it can be as dense as oak (It though is an east coast tree and not readily ship west, perhaps not economically feasible). I reclaim it from pallets and other packaging sources when I see. It's super great wood.

Fir comes in second, hemlock third and spruce fourth. Of course southern yellow pine and fir woods can be purchased in treated forms. Only the southern yellow pine is a truly treated wood. The fir here on the west coast is dipped and much of the interior is not treated. There are also health issues related to PT treated woods. Older versions used arsenic in the formula: newer versions use copper sulfate and other chemicals. When I make my planters I make my own treated wood by applying boric acid and vegetable oil to the surface of the wood. The pioneers used boric acid and water. This is safe and can be applied at anytime when needed.

Other woods are redwood and those hardwoods that come out of tropical rain forests. Here we should resist the temptation of use. We need to protect the rain forest period and redwood groves should be protected (Though there are so favorable news coming from sustainable groves). Further a new study found that new growth redwood has less tannin than new growth fir.

So my recommendation is to use fir for your stairs.

Kurt Preissler
RollingPlanter.com ( http://www.houzz.com/pro/rollingplanter )
June 25, 2014 at 9:13am     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

8 Materials for Raised Garden Beds

Get the dirt on classic and new options for raised vegetable and plant beds, to get the most from your year-round garden Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lovesmesomepitbulls
Great article and great comments. Thank you for this!
June 8, 2014 at 10:41am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
eternalquestforknowledge
I like the idea of using stock tanks for a raised garden. I looked into purchasing one and the description says that they use 'four-ply double-lock seam at the bottom sealed with Pliogrip Adhesive/Sealant Seam Sealer for a superior bond'. Sounds like a silicone based sealant to keep water in. Would this pose any health risks to the food grown in these tanks? Does any company sell these without these sealants?
on Sunday at 3:00pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Permeable Paving Soaks Up Rain

Design garden hardscaping that allows rain to penetrate through to the earth below Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Hillside Solutions...Landscaping on the Slant

When spring arrives, it’s hard to pull me back inside. My thoughts are continually drawn to the outdoors on these beautiful spring afternoons.... Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Landscapers Las Vegas
Thanks for posting this. i really had good time reading this Landscapers Las Vegas
October 19, 2010 at 11:16pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Between Naps on the Porch
Thanks for visiting and commenting, Landscaperslasvegas!
October 20, 2010 at 6:38am   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Build a Greener Driveway

New project for a new year: Install a permeable driveway to keep pollutants out of water sources and groundwater levels balanced Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Tara Framer
Ok... It's time to do my driveway... I'm in Westchester county -- in a suburb of NYC -- and I'm still looking for a paving contractor who does permeable or other Eco-friendly driveways, but there don't seem to be any in my area. Please respond if you know of any paving companies in the NY tri-state area who offer 'green' paving. Thanks!
April 16, 2014 at 8:17pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Sidonia
Hi Tara. I know of MPS Paving Systems Australia who do beautiful natural stone permeable driveways all over the world. I'm not sure who their contractors are in NY area but you could contact them and find out: www.mpspaving.com.au. Hope this helps!
April 16, 2014 at 8:23pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

Grow a Beautiful Garden With Ecofriendly Greywater

Reducing home water waste means lower bills and a healthier planet. Here's how to set up a greywater home irrigation system that can help Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Urbanata
Outstanding photography, who does your location shoots? Do you deal with Patrick Janikowski, AIA here in Seattle as you would be a perfect fit.
July 19, 2014 at 3:14pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Spring Creek Aquatic Concepts
@Urbanata, if you are referring to our photos, thank you! They come from myself and some of our clients at random. Just don't tell my sem-pro photographer friend ( none of these are his ) that you enjoyed our photos. He would grumble. He says my photos stink , but still says I have a very good eye. I tell him, our photos work! ;) I just use a point and shoot, but eventually will give in to his demands that I use an SLR camera. You might see his point of view if you blew these up to poster size. My philosophy is the camera needs to fit on one of the 382323 pockets in my pants/shirt/vest/jacket when I am in the field, or it won't get used at that perfect moment. btw greetings from outside portland!
July 19, 2014 at 3:38pm     
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Get Your Prairie On

Have a field day with your landscape, even if you've got just a few modern containers on a paved path Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
sjb -- yup, buffalo grass. Blue grama. Sideoats grama and prairie dropseed might be a bit too tall (12-18") for you but those are LOVELY bunch shortgrasses. Where are you at in IA? I'm thinking of moving that way.
November 8, 2013 at 8:56am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Melanie Lingard
Great article! I've always loved the look but didn't attempt it thinking it would end up looking like an unkempt yard. I'll have to get the book you suggested.
November 26, 2013 at 10:38am   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell bookmarked an ideabook

How to Design a Great Garden on a Sloped Lot

Get a designer's tips for turning a hillside yard into the beautiful garden you’ve been dreaming of Full Story
     Comment   July 6, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Kathleen
Thank you Carol. We are thinking of using native rock for low walls. Couldn't agree with you more on not having grass. Have used the stone and thyme in the front. Due to shade issues will need shade plantings.
June 19, 2014 at 4:11am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
marymwa
I love this conversation and am getting some ideas on how to tackle my slope. I also wanted to include techniques that avoid any runoff of water into the street/sewer system. I think it is more than a french drain but an actual trench filled with gravel or rocks. I saw an example once but forgot the name. It rains very seldom in the coastal area of San Diego but I am trying to avoid the runoff. I also want to terrace the hillside with block walls. The most pronounced slope is on the side of the house before the street. I definitely like the picture of the Mediterranean plantings which would go well in my area.
June 27, 2014 at 12:14pm   
Sign Up to comment
nathan dalzell added 1 photo to ideabook: here for now
   Comment   July 1, 2014
nathan dalzell added 1 photo to ideabook: pockets
   Comment   July 1, 2014
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™