pheebers


pheebers likes 3 comments on an ideabook

Considering Renting to Vacationers? Read This First

More people are redesigning their homes for the short-term-rental boom. Here are 3 examples — and what to consider before joining in Full Story
     Comment   on Sunday
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rainwood
Sometime, the nightmare becomes the neighbors'. The owner of the house behind our weekend house wasn't able to sell for his wildly optimistic price so he decided to rent it out, including as a wedding venue. Many weekends, there were 150-175 people for whom there wasn't adequate parking plus the septic system wasn't designed with that kind of use in mind and all of us downhill owners were quite nervous about it. The renters wanted absolute peace and quiet for their special day, but we all had yard work to do and lives to live. It was not fun.

Someone complained to the county, and they limited the weddings to two a year. And after we put up a gate and a no trespassing sign, the owner finally stopped telling his guests to trespass across our property to get to the beach. But, we still all hate the turnover and noise every week, and wish it could be banned completely. Be prepared for unhappy neighbors if your place becomes a popular destination.
August 13, 2014 at 9:27PM     
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oleandergirl
We rented out our beach home at a popular vacation destination. It was too heart breaking to come back to see the destruction that we stopped renting. Don't make your rental property too personal! Use throw away furniture, and cheap accessories, that way when the things are broken or simply disappear, you won't be too upset.
August 14, 2014 at 6:36AM     
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brouije
There's a case of a woman who through airbnb rented her Palm Springs home to a vacationer and now she can't get him out. He's like a squatter and it's going to take from 3 to 6 months to evict him and thousands of dollars in lawyers fees. It's probably a system that works out for most people but do you want to chance that you'll get the nut?
last Saturday at 4:45PM     
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pheebers likes a comment on an ideabook

Dish-Drying Racks That Don’t Hog Counter Space

Cleverly concealed in cabinets or mounted in or above the sink, these racks cut kitchen cleanup time without creating clutter Full Story
     Comment   July 27, 2014
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oldglstuf
These dish racks look like they are for people who only heat up take out. I scratch cook almost everything every day and my dish drainer looks like a junkyard when I'm done piled high with large pots and pans,measuring cups and spoons, cheese graters, large wooden and stainless steel spoons, whisks, cutting boards, various types of Pyrex ware, cookie sheets, can openers, chef's knives and who knows what else. If you only have a few dishes and glasses just dry 'em and put 'em away, for heaven's sake.
July 23, 2014 at 2:49PM     
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pheebers likes a comment on an ideabook

12 Questions Your Interior Designer Should Ask You

The best decorators aren’t dictators — and they’re not mind readers either. To understand your tastes, they need this essential info Full Story
     Comment   July 27, 2014
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hayleydaniels
One thing I've noticed about the homes on Houzz, and those in the advice forums is that people are afraid to make their homes some place they can be comfortable in such as having a favorite chair to watch TV in. I would be interested to know how many people have renovated their homes so they could be featured on here, only to discover that they're afaid to 'live' in them for fear of mussing them up. My mother's home is a show place, and I've never been comfortable in it.

In regards to doors, you want something wide enough to get furniture through, but more importantly, a gurney should you need to call 911 for a heart attack or stroke.

Lastly, does anyone with a $1,000 budget actually hire a designer? If so, the fee alone would leave them with little to do anything on.
July 26, 2014 at 3:45PM     
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pheebers commented on an ideabook

Decorating 101: How to Shop for Furniture

Before you hit the stores, learn what furniture to get rid of, what to look for when buying, and how to avoid mistakes Full Story
     Comment   July 27, 2014
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pheebers
Wicked, please tell me I misunderstood you and you didn't say something is a man's job. :( The problem, as you've figured out by now, was where you bought your table. The delivery people for Sears don't know if you've spent $50 or $5000; it's the same procedure for them. You're better off at a higher-end store known for its customer service. I didn't spend much more than you for my kitchen table but the delivery people laid paper down to walk on, set everything up where I wanted, and showed me how to put in the leaves, etc. The store called me later that day to make sure I was happy, which I was.
July 27, 2014 at 5:09AM     
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hattieli
I agree i know there are better ways for comfort, so totally agree
August 8, 2014 at 9:45AM   
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acagal
Thinking of the person who likes a firm sofa. Bassett makes some sofas, in the USA, to fit your firmness needs and your color/fabric choices. There are also some Italian made sofas at Macy's that may/may not fit your needs. I sit for as long as necessary before buying chairs, sofas, or cars. I buy my cars for the driver's and passengers' seats, and accessibility to instrument package, not for the hype. I may spend more hours in a car/day than in chairs or sofas. So far good seating has paid off in long life for both vehicles and furniture, as well as helping preserve my comfort. I agree with you, that many American sofas are way too soft, and lack any ergonomic awareness.
August 13, 2014 at 9:29AM     
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