Ryan Hardman


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Home owner 
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Ceiling
   Comment   last Wednesday
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Courtyard
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: 15 CC
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Stairway
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Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

8 Things Successful Architects and Designers Do

Good architects tell a story and engage the senses. They understand the rules — and know when to break them Full Story
     Comment   last Wednesday
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frenchdecor
I use this article to give other point of view, those who trapped in bad design circle. Professionals seems pat each other's back and sure that rules (or breaking them), concepts and guide lines are excellent and novice are eager to follow them, too. Here some pictures my husband took for me, later I checked and I didn't like them, nether our daughter. The prices between 500-700k, rare house cost less around here. Who thinks they are for poor people? Or who think they were not designed by architect? And who think there school for bad architect (for poor folks) and school for good architect (custom) for 10% of population? I believe they are universal professionals in first place, then they have different work places and experience.
23 hours ago   
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outofplumb
I would add a ninth idea except it rarely happens: “They see how the design worked out and learn from it”. Steward Brand’s excellent book, How Buildings Learn, talks at length about how architects rarely if ever actually evaluate the use of a building once completed much to the chagrin of those that have to live and/or work in the buildings. Similar points in Michael Pollan’s also excellent book, A Place of My Own
17 hours ago   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Architecture
   Comment   last Wednesday
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Furniture
   Comment   last Wednesday
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Got a Hot, Humid Landscape? Add Tropical Flair With Air Plants

Turn tree trunks and walls into lush canvases with plants adapted to the canopies of the rain forest Full Story
     Comment   September 7, 2014
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Joonid Gooljanee
hi. The staghorn ferns should never be attached to a fruit tree as it is likely to absorb all the boost of the tree therefore the tree will go weak slowly until it will die THIS IS HOW WE EXPERIENCE THIS here in mauritius.I like the idea for the suggestion given .GOOD WORK I LIKE YOUR JOB.THANKS.
last Thursday at 10:34AM   
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Trilliums Landscaping & Horticulture
Mexican Laelia specie orchids ( NOT Brazilian Laelia orchids) do well in areas that get occasional light frosts, also mono filament fishing line works well to attach epiphytes, its almost invisible, just remember to remove it when the plants have attached.
last Thursday at 12:12PM   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Door
   Comment   August 28, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: 15 CC
   Comment   August 28, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Get Turned On to a Lighting Plan

Coordinate your layers of lighting to help each one of your rooms look its best and work well for you Full Story
     Comment   August 27, 2014
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dreamdoctor
julleah - try to make the process as organic as possible - don't decide what needs to happen til you have to. One step at a time. Get the samples - maybe even a six foot piece to start. Accent lights are usually point source - I have a 300 watt halogen up light (modified torchere) in my kitchen that goes from mood light to task light with the setting of the dimmer. Everything is relative, try not to pre-conceive what it OK and what is not - light is light you decide how to use it. What we want to accomplish with the linear light source at the top of the cabinets is (ambient) sun light/day sky. you can put the cool and warm test strips on one transformer - then try one then the other and you'll get an idea of what it will look like. The light color (in kelvin) is partially a matter of preference and partly a matter of aesthetics. A modern/Euro kitchen would probably be more appropriate with cool light, a more "traditional" kitchen (wood/brass) with warm. I would put in both (not a very big investment) on different circuits - probably use the cool for food prep and the warm or combination of the two for ambient the rest of the time. Once again, I'd have to see the test fixtures in place and know your preferences which you may not even know until you try them.

As an aside - color temperature has a psycho-physical response associated with it. Cooler light colors (which are hotter light temperatures - this gets confusing) such as white and bluer colors tend to wake you up while warmer light colors (cooler light temperatures) such as yellow. orange and red tend to help you get to sleep or stay sleepy - so if you are going to go to the kitchen at night to make sure the chocolate cake is OK you may want to have the option of a (very) warm light so you don't wake up too much. This is why I put in the three bulb, amber step lights (Innovative Lighting Technologies/Roland Iowa) in the house - so I can walk around at night and not have the light wake me up but still provide enough light to navigate.

If the lighting works great there was a fair amount of thought that went into it.
September 3, 2014 at 6:56AM   
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Gemma McLuckie
I wish one of the lighting experts would do an ideabook about bathroom lighting, other than sconces and chandeliers. I have not seen one on lighting in the rest of the bath or tips on usefulness, including making sure fixtures provide enough light to keep folks from falling, etc. Thanks!
September 6, 2014 at 6:09PM     
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Ryan Hardman added 2 photos to ideabook: Pool
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

10 Top Plants Native to the Desert Southwest

Get a thriving garden despite unforgiving conditions with these tough, unthirsty, sun-loving beauties Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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lkmcgregor
I live in the Arizona desert, and I've never heard of Pink Muhly... interesting. Texas Sage is very popular here.
August 23, 2014 at 11:51PM     
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QUERCUS
I'm rolling at the poetic answer at the top!

Me, no poems, But yours' are great choices, and all but a few I had, though each one thrives here in El Paso! I think the landscape in the SW without some cacti is rather power-less.

Someday, I hope pinkish SW native, Muhlenbergia porteri, gets popular. Mtn States grew some, but no one specified it even where it once grew wild, prior to development. Just like a couple native oaks from the same large development...
August 25, 2014 at 3:14PM   
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Ryan Hardman added 3 photos to ideabook: Landscape
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

The Right Stone for Your Garden Design

Gravel, pebble, cobble and paddle: Stones vary in size and shape, and have different uses in the landscape Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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ddelongc
I think some people overestimate the amount of water that a lawn needs in most areas. I did not have to water my lawn once and it was a long hot Summer with some intermittent rain. Of course, I don't insist that it look perfect and lush, as long as it's general green I'm o.k. with that. I think it's really really important for a new lawn to get lots of water though until it's well rooted. I also make fertilize my lawn a minimum of three tiems per year.
last Friday at 7:00PM     
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joann7
Thanks for the informative article about stone.
on Sunday at 3:57PM   
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Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Gardening Solutions for Dry, Sandy Soils

Has your desert or beachy site withered your gardening creativity? Try these ideas for a beautiful, easy-care landscape Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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Falon Land Studio LLC
Hi Sigrid- thanks for your question about dry, sandy soils that flood in the spring in Maine. I visited Maine during the Spring rains once, and I was amazed at the native species in a nearby wildlife refuge that survived flooding. I think step one is to find great natives. Ben has written a great ideabook with resources for locating natives:



Another thing to note is that plants that can withstand inundation can also survive in sandy soil. Those qualities are not contradictory. Plants that can withstand flooding will be noted as living in a suitable "hydroperiod". The hydroperiod is the number of days out of the year that a soil is saturated with water. Marginal wetland plants (those on the edges) can tolerate around 180 day hydroperiod, and I bet there are great Maine natives that survive seasonal flooding and are associated with wetland margins. I hope that gives you more info to help in your search for the right plants.
August 26, 2014 at 9:58AM   
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tsheets67
I'm trying to figure out what to do with sandy shaded sloped ground. I have fairly steep slopes that transition from the front yard to the driveway. There are also several mature oak and sycamore trees that result in near constant shade. The slope is also primarily North facing. My primary concern is erosion. The sandy soil washes down into the (gravel) driveway. I'm in Illinois zone 5.
last Saturday at 7:19AM   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Pantry
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Bedroom
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Organization
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Mud Room & Utility
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Furniture
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 2 photos to ideabook: Kitchen
   Comment   August 24, 2014
Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Material
   Comment   August 24, 2014
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Roundhouse
Hi, Roundhouse designed the kitchen only. We are bespoke designers and manufacturers of kitchens and can only answer questions about the kitchen cabinetry and appliances – sorry!
August 26, 2014 at 3:18AM   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Landscape
   Comment   August 23, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Parry Manzanita Stands Out in Low-Water Gardens

Make a dramatic architectural statement and feed wildlife in woodlands and more with Arctostaphylos manzanita Full Story
     Comment   August 23, 2014
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diyer59
Now you're talking! One of my favorite California natives. I'm fortunate that I have many in my area to admire. The trunks are my favorite feature, they almost look like well-tanned human arms and legs to me!
August 20, 2014 at 10:07AM   
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miztaryn
I'm at about 3000 feet in the Sierra Nevada foothills in California, and these things spread like the plague. Even during this drought, the plants are thriving. I have a grotto of manzanita behind my house and the deer love to sleep under them. The squirrels feast on the berries, the hummingbirds gorge themselves on the flowers, and the birds make nests in them. And the fragrance in the spring time is like no other, candles should be scented like this tree.

However, it should be mentioned that the tree does take maintenance. Large branches of it will die, leaving contrastingly gray and withered driftwood-like arms in your tree. Keep the chainsaw handy. It makes a mess with the leaves, and continues to drop them all year. It also has a month or two late late summer where it's ugly, the bark peels and reveals an ugly yellow underneath.
last Friday at 3:19PM   
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Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Key Measurements to Help You Design the Perfect Home Office

Fit all your work surfaces, equipment and storage with comfortable clearances by keeping these dimensions in mind Full Story
     Comment   August 23, 2014
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Dura Supreme Cabinetry
schin - You're welcome. I hope it helps.
August 27, 2014 at 6:34AM     
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samanthita
Desk and bookcase
August 27, 2014 at 10:45AM   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Material
   Comment   August 23, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Materials Workshop: Channel Glass Finds Its Groove in Homes

The commerical world already knew its benefits. Now channel glass is bringing diffused daylight, privacy and more to residences Full Story
     Comment   August 23, 2014
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Stuart Cohen & Julie Hacker Architects LLC
I like your remodeling shown in "Southern Charm in the California Wine Country." I would love to know what material the "barn red" roof is and who makes it. Thank you.
2 hours ago   
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Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

Narrow Trees for Tight Garden Spaces

Boost interest in a side yard or another space-challenged area with the fragrance and color of these columnar trees Full Story
     Comment   August 23, 2014
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alfida
Excelent information, thanks,
September 1, 2014 at 6:56AM   
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cc94949
I like this for the fence line at the end of the pool
September 7, 2014 at 3:46PM   
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Wall
   Comment   August 17, 2014
Ryan Hardman bookmarked an ideabook

10 Top Plants to Grow Indoors

Brighten a room and clean the air with a houseplant that cascades artfully, stretches toward the ceiling or looks great on a wall Full Story
     Comment   August 17, 2014
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Laurie
I already had that done when I bought the house. I removed some trees and had the rest trimmed up. The windows are smaller in these older homes and my eves are a lot larger than newer homes. I'll live with fewer house plants since the summers here are really hot. I need the shade.
September 8, 2014 at 7:23PM   
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jerryalan
Did anyone notice that the ZeeZee plant picture had a cat in it? and they said to keep away from cats. Guess what--the cat is smart enough to stay away from the ZZ plant.

I have a Pothos plant at work that is thriving. There are no windows and I am not good at remembering to water it. Somehow it continues to grow and look gorgeous.
Yesterday at 4:10AM     
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Ryan Hardman added 1 photo to ideabook: Shelving
   Comment   August 17, 2014

Reviews by Ryan Hardman (1)

Review for Ken & Carrie's Beach Plumbing & Supplies:

Ken & Carrie's plumbing can be a little on the high side, but they are great to work with and you know you'll get an honest assessment of the work needed to be ...
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