trishawightman


Type:
Home owner 
trishawightman bookmarked an ideabook

Why We Love Midcentury Modern Design

There's a method to all this 'Mad Men'-ness — just look to psychology, tough times and, believe it or not, Apple Full Story
     Comment   on Sunday
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Lynden Door
Here's an ad concept I am kinda noodling around with...
July 25, 2014 at 8:02am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sartarehare
Yes, @luzucaro, the modernist movement began in the 20s. These are the same influences that we see in modern design today and this is why all modern design looks good together. (:
July 25, 2014 at 9:33am   
Sign Up to comment
trishawightman bookmarked an ideabook

Roots of Style: Midcentury Modern Design

Midcentury modern still charms with its linear forms and low-sloping roofs. Appreciate it now — such simplicity can be hard to replicate Full Story
     Comment   on Sunday
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Suburban Modern
I love that we are having so much discussion lately about the definition and relevance of "Mid Century Modern" and all that it implies. It was such a revolutionary time, and probably very exhilarating to be a part of as a professional. You ask: Can we still have that now?

While there are many valid takes on the essence of what we call mid century modern, and I'll help myself here to include Scandinavian or Danish modern, I personally zero in on what Steve Randel called "structural transparency" and "honesty of construction". I also like wordsmith Claire Goldstein's "frank architecture" and "very little redundancy".

I agree that most mid century houses were not masterpieces. But what they were, were affordable and practical family homes in the 1,000+ square foot range with no wasted space on lots of hallways or formal rooms used once a year. The materials came straight from new technology commissioned for WWII that were interesting and didn't need polishing, and people embraced them just the way they were. Exotic natural wood species, cork, laminate, plywood, terrazzo, textured glass, stainless steel, aluminum, vinyl, plexiglass, slate, stoneware tile, the list goes on. Enter one of my favorite subjects: truth in materials.

I, for one, keep asking myself: what happened? Why did we go back to covering everything up, installing layer upon layer of "decorative" finishes at great expense and fragility, printing and texturing one material to look like another material, deciding even ten different roof lines on one house were not enough, and bloating square footage to where your typical gated sub-division entry is as large as the whole mid century house?

I say we can go "back" and at the same time go forward. I look to my specialty of 48 years, Scandinavian design, for some sensible answers. They never abandoned the tenets of truth-in-materials design and are living large and beautifully in small footprints. We can very easily replicate their concepts of heating/cooling only the room you are in, heating water as it is used, building out of durable materials inside and out that never need care, and being honest about how you will use your spaces. I say we can afford to build vaulted wood ceilings, floor to ceiling glass (sited for passive solar gain) and open flow spaces ideal for multi-function furnishings, if we have the will to accept less personal indoor space.

Here is an example of a Norwegian living room, shockingly small to our way of thinking. But really, isn't it cozy and doesn't it do everything it should? There's nothing left to do but bring in a tray of candles and snacks and enjoy the view, the fire, and the company.
February 24, 2014 at 12:20pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Aztec Artistic Productions
Talk about 'Roots". I own an A. Quincy Jones home - one of 4 built in Oregon. I've found out more and more over time about the architect and contemporaries at the time like his relationship with Rummer and Eichler. http://www.eichlernetwork.com/article/roots-eichler-gable . This is a very interesting post, thank you!
on Tuesday at 10:29am     
Sign Up to comment
trishawightman bookmarked an ideabook

How to Get Midcentury Modern Style Today

Use the building blocks of midcentury modern design to create a new version for your own life and style Full Story
     Comment   on Sunday
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
kjziebell
http://www.dotandbo.com/ They have a lot of mid century modern reproduction pieces.
on Monday at 9:53am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
ghos
I love MCM, but I like to mix...
on Tuesday at 2:33pm     
Sign Up to comment
trishawightman started a discussion
     Comment   on Sunday
trishawightman bookmarked an ideabook

Plant Your Hardscape for Unexpected Green

Nestle greenery among pavers, steps and more for a yard brimming with life and creativity Full Story
     Comment   July 16, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
manonnicole
Stone
July 21, 2014 at 7:41am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
alibonelli
I have always loved this look. Saved every picture.
July 21, 2014 at 7:06pm     
Sign Up to comment
trishawightman added 1 photo to ideabook: trishawightman's Favorites
   Comment   July 16, 2014
trishawightman added 3 photos to ideabook: trishawightman's Favorites
   Comment   July 16, 2014
trishawightman added 1 photo to ideabook: trishawightman's Favorites
   Comment   July 15, 2014
trishawightman bookmarked an ideabook

The Secret to Pocket Doors' Success

Pocket doors can be genius solutions for all kinds of rooms — but it’s the hardware that makes all the difference. See why Full Story
     Comment   July 9, 2014
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Donco Designs
Pocket doors are a great design feature that can help open up a room with limited space. Pocket doors can add style to a room while also providing privacy to an area.
July 21, 2014 at 3:52am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Kamm Architecture
We use either pocket doors or surface mounted doors on exposed tracks, depending on the application. I love the look of the exposed track hardware, but you need clear wall space to the side of the door opening in order to make it work. The door then becomes a design feature. A pocket door essentially disappears when open, so you can create a greater flow of space.
July 21, 2014 at 1:42pm   
Sign Up to comment
trishawightman added 1 photo to ideabook: trishawightman's Favorites
   Comment   July 7, 2014
trishawightman added 1 photo to ideabook: trishawightman's Favorites
   Comment   July 7, 2014
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™