15,489 vegetable gardening containers Home Design Photos

sustainable garden design perth
1 Review
A Japanese Garden
Ideabooks521
Questions0
A japanese garden created in combination with a herb and vegetable garden contained in weathered Cor-ten steel tanks. The dry river bed was created using recycled mild steel pieces and naturally arranged river stones. The water feature was designed in unison with Yael K Designs.
This is idea for stone garden
herb and vegetable garden contained in weathered Cor-ten steel tanks.
Amazing, modern design for the raised garden bed
created in combination with a herb and vegetable garden contained for small space
Awesome way to feature a veggie garden
tree on the left with metal background as feature for back yard, in vege garden area?
Raised bed circle veg/herb garden, cement pavers, pathways, gravel, and desert plants.
“Veggie pots” — ninajudd
The Gardensmith
Vegetable Garden in Containers
Ideabooks2,079
Questions3
This vegetable garden is used year round. It is set up with an automatic watering system for a busy homeowner. The large containers are livestock watering troughs; tall enough to keep small dogs out.
Do the containers need holes in the bottom for drainage?
TY. Thought of all of that except the landscape fabric in bottom of container. Already started my raised beds out of wooden pallets, but definetly keeping this in mind for next year. Make it permanent and very "green".
cut into the bottom and are set on a bed of crushed rock. They have a few inches of crushed rock topped with landscape fabric in the bottom of the container.
section of our yard for vegetable plantings in these type of containers
“Gardening” — mcbethany
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks276
Questions0
'Sweet 100' cherry tomatoes growing in a 15-gallon terra-cotta pot. Container-grown tomatoes are more susceptible to blossom end rot, but cherry tomatoes like 'Sweet 100', 'Sungold', and 'Black Cherry' rarely have this problem. Photo by Steve Masley
put cherry tomatoes in a container
5. Tomatoes. Container-grown tomatoes are just as tasty as those grown in garden soil, and they have an added advantage if you live in an area with a tendency to have soil-borne diseases: Plant in containers and start with new soil
might be ideal in smaller containers and hanging baskets, you’ll probably want to stake the largest indeterminate varieties. See how to grow tomatoes
5. Tomatoes. Container-grown tomatoes are just as tasty as those grown in garden soil, and they have an added
“tomatoes” — tald
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks188
Questions0
Potting mixes for container gardens need to drain freely, but still retain moisture. My base potting soil mix contains (clockwise from upper left) coarse builder's sand, high-quality organic compost or worm castings, coconut coir, and small lava rock. I supplement this with additional compost, fresh
Masley has devised his own organic potting mix recipe: 1.One part coarse (builder’s) sand 2.Two parts good garden compost, sifted 3.One part rehydrated
CONTAINER GARDENING Prep your soil. Ask people who grow a lot of edibles for their secret, and chances are they will all tell you the same thing: good soil. Container gardens need soil that is quick draining, moisture retentive and nutrient
Masley has devised his own organic potting mix recipe: One part coarse (builder’s) sand Two parts good garden compost, sifted One part rehydrated coir (coconut husk fiber) One part 5/16-inch horticultural lava rock or perlite
“Container gardens” — cams09
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks269
Questions1
thrive. Look for a container that is at least 12 inches deep and 16 to 18 inches wide, then give it a place of honor with your other containers. It won’t disappoint.
6. Eggplants. The eggplant is often overlooked for both traditional edible gardens and container gardens. It’s a shame, because
to thrive. Look for a container that is at least 12 inches deep and 16 to 18 inches wide, then give it a place of honor with your other containers. It won’t disappoint.
Eggplants. The eggplant is often overlooked for both traditional edible gardens and container gardens. It’s a shame, because this really is a gorgeous plant, with beautiful violet-colored spring flowers and shiny bright fruits in shades of purple
“eggplants” — tald
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks141
Questions0
'Sweet 100' cherry tomatoes growing in a 15-gallon terra-cotta pot. Container-grown tomatoes are more susceptible to blossom end rot, but cherry tomatoes like 'Sweet 100', 'Sungold', and 'Black Cherry' rarely have this problem. Photo by Steve Masley
the easier it is to grow. Plant them in at least a 7-gallon container. Steve Masley Consulting and Design Landscape Architects & Designers Container Vegetable Gardens 'Sweet 100' cherry tomatoes growing in a 15-gallon terra-cotta pot. Container-grown tomatoes are more susceptible to blossom end rot, but
easier it is to grow. Plant them in at least a 7-gallon container.
7 gallon container, easier to grow
CHERRY TOMATOES Try cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes are great container plants, but it’s easy to forget to water them enough in
“cherry tomatoes- plant them in at least a 7 gallon container” — lsakagu
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks121
Questions0
Designers Container Vegetable Gardens Spinach is easy to grow in shallow pots or window boxes, and you can harvest leaves as needed for sandwiches, salads, and soups
4. Give your edibles enough light. As with other edible gardens, six to eight hours of good light is ideal for container gardens. South-
EDIBLES NEED LIGHT!!! Give your edibles enough light. As with other edible gardens, six to eight hours of good light is ideal for container gardens. South- and west-facing spots are best, but it’s possible to grow
4. Give your edibles enough light. As with other edible gardens, six to eight hours of good light is ideal for container gardens. South- and west-facing spots are best, but it’s possible to grow edibles on north- and east-facing locations — it’s just trickier
“Spinach” — gardengal14
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
Container Vegetable Gardens
Ideabooks94
Questions0
The "secret ingredient" in organic container gardens: worm castings with live worms. Red compost worms convert organic nutrients in potting soils into plant-available form, and the last chamber of the worm gut is loaded with beneficial bacteria and fungi that boost plant immunity, cycle nutrients,
that might attack your plants,” he says. Steve Masley Consulting and Design Landscape Architects & Designers Container Vegetable Gardens The "secret ingredient" in organic container gardens: worm castings with live worms. Red compost worms convert organic nutrients in potting soils into plant-available
Masley has devised his own organic potting mix recipe: One part coarse (builder’s) sand Two parts good garden compost, sifted One part rehydrated coir (coconut husk fiber) One
“growing edibles” — Hai_Li Lee
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