91,329 woodland plantings Home Design Photos

CYAN Horticulture
5 Reviews
Polygonum.bistorta.jpg
Ideabooks1,086
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Woodland at the UBC Botanical Garden Polygonum bistorta photo credit: Dave Demers, principal at CYAN Horticulture
POLYGONUM Woodland perennial hardy in cold areas
Flowering plants near path... green background shrubs... forest trees...
Most woodland gardens are located between existing trees or in the shadow of surrounding
natural looking - like the trail...don't like how the plants are growing onto the trail
Native Plants Inspire and Educate at NYC’s Botanical GardenNative plants for the Western U.S.:California native plants | Northwest native plantsSouthwest native plants | Rocky Mountains native plants
Most woodland gardens are located between existing trees or in the shadow of surrounding buildings. At the University of British Columbia, the Asian Woodland Garden (shown here) rolls under gigantic yet sparse Douglas firs. Plants adore them! Note the layering of plants, from taller shrubs in the back
“Poligomun, hardy even in MN?” — Linda Stern
Confidence Landscaping, Inc.
confidence landscaping inc
Ideabooks1,992
Questions1
path, planting beds and swing set for my backyard with similar elements
plantings like this in the front
shady woodlands I like
plantings around flagstone walkway
play structure in woodland setting
Love the woodland feel
WOODLAND G Woodland Garden
natural planting and paths
woodland planting...grown plants
“layout of stones; 1 long, 2 smaller” — cfinsb
CYAN Horticulture
5 Reviews
Trillium.jpg
Ideabooks333
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charming planting of various trilliums and spring anemones
This charming planting of various trilliums and spring anemones creates a jewel box of a garden in Vancouver
It might be because of its contained, somewhat closed-in feel that the woodland garden accommodates odds and ends so successfully, individual plants rather than large sweeps. This charming planting of various trilliums and spring anemones creates a
that the woodland garden accommodates odds and ends so successfully, individual plants rather than large sweeps. This charming planting of various trilliums and spring anemones creates a jewel box of a garden in Vancouver.
It might be because of its contained, somewhat closed-in feel that the woodland garden accommodates odds and ends so successfully, individual plants rather than large sweeps. This charming planting of various trilliums and spring anemones creates a jewel box of a garden
“Schatten” — pollux33
Contemporary Landscape
Ideabooks1,837
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decorated with plants, which most certainly would have degraded the landscape. Instead, simple understory plants celebrate the majestic woodland. I plant my share of flowering understory trees — and the landscape wouldn't be complete without them — but I encourage you to consider planting shade trees, no matter
decorated with plants, which most certainly would have degraded the landscape. Instead, simple understory plants celebrate the majestic woodland.
undergrowth plants in forested land to celebrate the trees
The beauty and power of the forest is clear in this photo. The slope could have been decorated with plants, which most certainly would have degraded the landscape. Instead, simple understory plants
“Rocks” — whidlaydds
Andrew Keys
'Little Honey' oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia 'Little Honey')
Ideabooks658
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Shade Plants: Little Honey Oak Leaf Hydrangea
How to plant what I just bought. Cool!
beautiful oakleaf hydrangeas with excellent planting notes- hoping it will tolerate the
Good plant for partially shaded areas
smaller plant that will fit well in gardens of any size. The more sun it gets, the more gold it will be, but it grows best is part shade
Planting notes. Plant oakleaf hydrangeas in the fall, late spring or early summer. The most important aspect of the soil is that it is well drained and fertile. While these are native understory woodland plants, they can tolerate lots of sunlight in the north and require only partial shade in the
newly planted oakleaf hydrangeas in burlap for the winter.1. Dig a hole three times the circumference of the container and about the same height as the container. Remove the plant gently.2. Add enough soil to hold the plant in place, fill the hole with water and let the plant absorb the water. If your
“Honey oak leaf hydrangea” — pfesta1
Deborah Cerbone Associates, Inc.
5 Reviews
A Classic Country White Garden
Ideabooks11,638
Questions3
All planting design by Deborah Cerbone Associates, Inc.
I am looking for shade plants that can tolerate dry conditions and that are deer proof. I really like your work.
a dry Woodland area?
woodland wonderland
Landscaping shady plants
rocks - plants...Plants in shade...Plants in garden...Woodland landscape...Backyard plants...Plants and walkway...storey planting....Shade plantings
“Bosque2” — lferreir
Rhodes Architecture + Light
10 Reviews
Spring Hill Residence
Ideabooks15,612
Questions3
What kind of plant is that on the left of the picture? Almost looks like monkey grass
what is the plant type looking like some sort of grass
what is the plant type looks like grass
yard I planted 3 years ago and cannot recall the name-this setting looks great!
Our side garden might like plants like host as as there is not a lot of sunlight through the day
carefully planted path, but the effect is quite lovely if having open access isn’t necessary. Alternately, you can plant gardens on each side of the yard, leaving a path of turf or hardscaping wide enough for a lawnmower or barbecue grill. Just be sure not to crowd the side of the house with plants, since
place to plant things with aggressive roots.More: What to Do in Your Garden Now
“annachiote @yahoo.com. br” — annachiote
Barbara Pintozzi
September
Ideabooks53
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dressing for woodland plants.Revive lawns. If your lawn sports dead patches courtesy of the drought, September is the optimum time to rejuvenate it by sowing grass seed. By November the lawn should be lush and green again.Plant perennials. September is also the perfect time to plant perennials and woody plants
time to plant in Great Lakes gardens, but gardeners are discovering that with unreliable moisture and often unbearable summer heat, new plants do better under the less harsh conditions of autumn. By planting in September, the gardener is guaranteed that the new plants will have sufficient time to become
time to plant perennials and woody plants," writes Illinois garden coach Barbara Pintozzi. "It used to be that spring was the best time to plant in Great Lakes gardens, but gardeners are discovering that with unreliable moisture and often unbearable summer heat, new plants do better under the less-harsh
“fall plantings?” — 285diane
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