SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
webuser_355114

..... Anything You Want to Talk About VII? - (probably mostly OT)

tapla
7 years ago
last modified: last month

This is the 7th reposting of the thread that was started more than 10 years ago. It has a lot of interesting comments and images. Feel free to post whatever you like

What have you to share with us? A funny story, something new, a garden(ing) question you might not know quite where to ask, .....?

Al

Comments (1.4K)

  • tropicofcancer (6b SW-PA)
    2 years ago

    Never had crappie before but sounds delicious. Might sound gross but, as kids, we used to fight over who gets to eat the eyeball. Our idea of fishing was to run across shallow streams with a basket and hope something lands in there. Used to catch mostly small fish. Fishing was not really a popular sport back then in India since we get plenty of fresh and often live fish from the market. Back home, where I come from fish is the primary meat source and people truly love them. If the fish is less than foot or so long, my wife (like many from my town) will devour the whole thing - head, tail, eyes, bones and anything else in between. Cooked of course.

    Al, would love to make a tool rack like yours. It looks quite portable too. One question: I see some thin gauge copper wire rolls. What do you use it for (guy wire, small twigs ??) and where do you get a nice roll like that?

    tapla thanked tropicofcancer (6b SW-PA)
  • four (9B near 9A)
    2 years ago

    On a whim, I decided to explore whether Al had posted anything anywhere in gardenweb during the past year or so. I knew about a time-indefinite retirement intention, and last knew about the business busyness. Bingo : retirement and postings, Yay.
    I like to eat salmon eyes.
    Are pike good for eating?
    To leave soon for foot doctor appointment; fifth infection on top of same foot, different location each time. They do not know reason for recurrences (superb health otherwise).


    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • Related Discussions

    Most Loathed item you WANT to get rid of but can't?

    Q

    Comments (253)
    When we sold the farm I wanted to buy a townhouse (let someone else cut the grass and clear the snow, only a tiny garden for me). But hubby wanted to bring his tractor. So we bought a city house with a big yard. He still gets to use the riding mower and I still have to look after the huge gardens. He has a storage container with farm stuff he'll never use again - and the tractor! You can take the farmer out of the country, but you can't take away his stuff!
    ...See More

    How do you feel about "Word Art?"

    Q

    Comments (152)
    Most of them are "life lessons for the forgetful," IMO. Might be as helpful to label your toilet paper and toothbrush so you remember to use them (not necessarily simultaneously though.) Great to see all you "old Houzzers" back on here! Maybe Emily should put up a humor category so the fun and games can continue!
    ...See More

    What do you think about this couch?

    Q

    Comments (33)
    @chi11....Hi again and you're welcome! :-) I hope these ideas offer some inspiration for you. Please know that although I have posted some suggestions for furniture pieces, etc., it's primarily meant to stir up ideas. And, it's still really important for you to put together a functional layout for your space (as some of us suggested earlier) and find an inspiration for color, style, etc. I peeked at your ideabook earlier to get a sense of your style. My suggestions so far have been based on how I've interpreted your style through the couple of your ideabook pics I saw.....as well as the style of furniture you posted above. So, hopefully the suggestions haven't been way off.... :-) Anyway, here's a few more ideas for coffee tables below. These are from RH and some come in various sizes. (You'll definitely need the smaller size of the 1st one below). Just keep in mind that the table size should be based on certain dimensions of your sofa. If I'm remembering correctly, I think the table length should be somewhere between 1/2-2/3 the length of the sofa and the height should be about the same height (or within about 2-3 inches lower) as the sofa's seat height. Hope this helps.
    ...See More

    POLL: What do you love about snowy winters?

    Q

    Comments (90)
    I've never experienced a snowy winter - I did not see snow until I was 11. I do like to visit snow briefly, in nearby mountains, but I do not spend the night - day trips only: View of Palm Springs from the tram on Mt San Jacinto.
    ...See More
  • tapla
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Mike: Crappie are a mild-tasting panfish with flaky flesh. I think the downsides are, they are often found in large volumes but are small in size. They're sort of bony, so it's best to fillet them, but it's hard to fillet a small fish and come up with enough to fry. Pike from cold water are tasty, but are also bony. Not as much of a consideration because mature fish are quite large. Fresh water perch are my favorite fish. Lucky for me the bay (Saginaw Bay) is full of them.

    ..... if you have not shown us before, your light set up down in the basement if you ever get a moment.


    I have 2 - 4x8 tables made of 2x4s anchored to floor joists and the framework is covered with FRP panel (Fiberglas reinforced panel). The panel slopes toward the hole in the middle, under which there's a funnel that directs any excess water into a bucket I empty the day after watering. The panel cleans up easily at the end of the plants' indoor stay.

    I just ordered 30 - 4ft led fixtures (2 rows of LED lights per fixture, color temp 6000K, 5650 lumens per fixture) to replace the fluorescents in my grow area and workshop, I expect to save about 80% of my outlay for plant lighting, which will be a considerable savings.

    The adjustable work table has been done for years - I just made a larger tool holder. It's very handy to have everything you even might need readily at hand when working on trees. It saves time looking for stuff because I forgot where I put it last.
    ToC - I use the wire almost exclusively for guy wires on trees, but I occasionally use it to wire very fine branches of very small trees. It's easy to find online - just search bare copper wire 1 lb If it says it's "dead soft" it's easier to work with.

    From amazon prime.

    Four - Pike from cold water lakes & rivers are mild and tasty, but are also bony. Not as much of a
    consideration because mature fish are quite large. Fresh water perch are
    my favorite fish. Lucky for me the bay (Saginaw Bay) is full of them.

    As kids, my brother and I would fish Dynamite Cut in Saginaw Bay for pike and LM bass. The pike would show up about 2 weeks before season opened. My brother and I would fish catch/release until our arms were worn out. ALL, as in 'every') fish we caught would be in the 24" to 40" range, and we would hook-up on about every other cast. By the time season started, they were gone, but the bass would be in. We had the same type of fishing for bass, which would be gone by the time bass season opened.

    We were fishing pike one particularly nice day when I had a strike. I thought I foul-hooked the fish because it was coming in sideways, but it turned out that, somehow, the line was wrapped around the fish and the hook was over the line - not in the fish. We had a good laugh about that. As I was executing the very next cast, I could tell there was something weird going on because the line coming off the spool of the spinning reel slowed notably almost immediately after I released the line. after only a second or two, a black-capped tern fell into the water - knocked out completely. We hustled over and picked up the bird so it wouldn't drown and laid it on the front seat of the boat. It regained consciousness soon after, but sat on a life vest for about an hour before it finally flew off. So, in 2 casts I lassoed a fish and knocked out a bird. Fun stuff .......

    Al


  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    2 years ago
    last modified: last year

    That's a great story, Al!

    My Royal Hawaiian Purple hoya is blooming again. The fragrance is quite strong.



    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • Vance Evans
    last year

    I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving! My wife is getting into the Christmas spirit. She's done a lot of decorating. We are also expecting baby number two in May. I guess that means I will spend less time taking care of plants again. If anyone wants to add me on facebook here's my facebook link

    tapla thanked Vance Evans
  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Congrats, Vance!


    Had a very nice Thanksgiving here, and my girlfriend and I got a Christmas tree today....two, actually. We went and cut one for her mom, then we bought a living Spruce for the holiday that we will plant at her mom's property in the forest.


    Josh

    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • tapla thanked Loveplants2 8b Virginia Beach, Virginia
  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Happy Holidays, my friends!

    One week to go of finals, then I'll have a couple weeks off to make visits, hike, take pictures, cook things, and play in the greenhouse. I am currently fermenting some Thai chiles and Elephant garlic that I grew, and I will turn them into a proper sauce over the Christmas vacation.


    I also harvested the pineapples that my brother in law and I have been growing for years now. Definitely worth the wait, as they're the best tasting pineapples that I've ever had.




  • tapla
    Original Author
    last year

    The following was sent to my by a buddy from downstate. I found it moving, so I thought I'd share. If you ("you" used collectively) haven't seen it, I hope you enjoy it. If you have seen it, I still hope you enjoy another look. Some of you might end up see it twice because I forwarded it to friends in my contacts, too.

    Recently I overheard a father and daughter in their last moments together at the airport. They had announced the departure.

    Standing near the security gate, they hugged and the father said, 'I love you, and I wish you enough.'

    The daughter replied, 'Dad, our life together has been more than
    enough. Your love is all I ever needed. I wish you enough, too, Dad.'

    They kissed and the daughter left. The Father walked over to the
    window where I was seated. Standing there I could see he wanted and
    needed to cry. I tried not to intrude on his privacy, but he welcomed
    me in by asking, 'Did you ever say good-bye to someone knowing it would
    be forever?'

    'Yes, I have,' I replied. 'Forgive me for asking, but why is this a forever good-bye?'..

    'I am old, and she lives so far away. I have challenges ahead and the
    reality is - the next trip back will be for my funeral,' he said.

    'When you were saying good-bye, I heard you say, 'I wish you enough..' May I ask what that means?'

    He began to smile. 'That's a wish that has been handed down from other
    generations. My parents used to say it to everyone...'

    He
    paused a moment and looked up as if trying to remember it in detail, and
    he smiled even more. 'When we said, 'I wish you enough,' we were
    wanting the other person to have a life filled with just enough good
    things to sustain them.' Then turning toward me, he shared the
    following as if he were reciting it from memory.

    I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright no matter how gray the day may appear.

    I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun even more.
    I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive and everlasting.

    I wish you enough pain so that even the smallest of joys in life may appear bigger.

    I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.
    I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.

    I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.

    He then began to cry and walked away.

    They say it takes a minute to find a special person, an hour to
    appreciate them, a day to love them; but then an entire life to forget
    them.
    Only if you wish, send this to the people you will never
    forget. If you don't send it to anyone it may mean that you are in such a
    hurry that you have forgotten your friends.

    *TAKE TIME TO LIVE....*

    To all my friends - *I WISH YOU ENOUGH*

    *********************************************************************

    Hi Josh - I was really busy in the lead-up to Christmas, and sort of
    lost track of what was going on at Houzz/GW, so I missed your post until
    just now. I did see Laura's, though. I hope you, and Laura, and all the
    rest of the folks that participate here had a good series of holidays.

    Pineapple
    is far and away my favorite fruit. I LOVE it! There's nothing better
    than a big plate full of pineapple with some other fruit tossed in, for
    breakfast. I've been known to stay at certain hotels when I travel
    because the breakfast bar has bowls of pineapple, blueberries,
    strawberries, and a mix of melon chunks to select from. The hotel I'm
    thinking about also has bacon that's sooooo good. Lol - making a salad
    for dinner tonight and I just talked myself into frying up some bacon to
    add some additional interest.

    The chiles look pretty interesting.
    I like really hot stuff, and fortify my favorite store-bought hot sauce
    (La Victoria Salsa Brava) with habanero. The air lock in the lid takes
    me back to be beer-making days, as the fermenter required one.Lots
    of snow on the ground here. Roads and sidewalks are all iced up, so
    I've been walking in the 2 sections of woods owned by the local
    community college. It's amazing how quickly the chickadees will come to
    the hand in the winter - especially when there's snow cover.


    Al

  • four (9B near 9A)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    The chickadees --- Is it that you carry something that they like, and you hold it out to them?

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    2 things make it really easy to tame chickadees to the hand. 1) It really helps if it's winter and there's snow on the ground - especially on cold/sunny days. 2) If there are near neighbors feeding the birds, the birds are unlikely to take the chance you're their benefactor, and flit to the closest feeder.

    It also helps if you know how to look nonthreatening. At first, only watch nearby birds from your peripheral vision, don't open your mouth, and don't smile. If you look directly at a bird, the bird will feel threatened - until it's used to you. I usually lean on a tree and look downward, or close my eyes to slits until they're comfy.

    Fastest way:

    Day 1 - Go to a lonely wooded spot and tie a small can (6-8 oz) to a tree and fill with sunflower seeds (with hulls).

    Day 2 - Wear warm clothes and a hat that will hold seed in a depression at the top of the hat. Go to your spot, remove or empty the can, add a small handful of seeds to the top of your hat and lean on the tree so your hat is as close as possible to where the can was. Stay still and wait. When birds are near, don't look at them. You'll hear them flutter about, assessing. They'll land on the tree just above you and within minutes will be feeding from the hat. After you have a half dozen birds coming and going, shake the seeds off the hat and hold some in your palm. The birds will soon come to the hand. On day 2, it shouldn't take more than 10-15 minutes before you have visitors.

    If you want to do it in your yard, it's best to fill a small container (I use an 8 oz mushroom can) at the same time each day. It helps if you make some sort of recognizable sound when you've set the table. Three short blasts on a whistle, calling out "chickadee-dee-dee" - anything that will illicit that sort of Pavlovian response. It won't take long before they'll be waiting impatiently for you to join them; after all, lunch is always on you.

    Al





    PS - don't wear a black hat or gloves - makes it harder for even the sharp-eyed chickadees to see the seeds. After they know you - you'll have lots of leeway insofar as how you can behave in their presence w/o alarming them.

    Al

  • four (9B near 9A)
    last year

    What a fabulous tutorial. Down to the "with hulls" (I laughed) (and appreciated knowing it).

    You know, it seems that the butterflies let me go near, then depart as soon as I look at them directly.

    OTOH, the turtles are bold. It takes just once of coaxing one to take a worm from my hand, then months later (encounters are infrequent), uninvited, it will approach from a long distance, and look upwards at me, even crawl onto my foot. On two occasions I was unaware of its presence next to me, and booted it hard when I moved.

    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Hello, everyone!


    It's time to start gardening again....starting peppers seeds, harvesting the citrus, pruning and re-potting maples and conifers. Sure wasn't much of a break!

    I've been on a pickling kick lately. Korean-style pickled radish, and spicy pickled eggs. And, yes, that's a Ghost pepper I put in there.

    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • tapla
    Original Author
    last year

    ..... because it's his country.

    Al

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last year

    Well, they SAID they needed blood because supplies were dwindling due to the pandemic. I went early this morning to donate, but there were just too many stupid questions to answer. Whose blood is it? Where'd you get it? Why's it in a bucket? ......

    Al

  • four (9B near 9A)
    last year

    That is good, especially to me who donates, out of one of my veins in real-time, every eight weeks. Minimum interval is FDA mandated. Questions too : ).

    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • Vance Evans
    last year

    Hope everyone is well. I haven't been on in forever. We have another baby boy in the house now and there is no time to really do anything. Its amazing how hard it is with two children.


    Anyways, I've got to start repotting some of my plants soon, because they are getting rootbound.


    Hope everyone is staying healthy!

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last year

    Every morning, the CEO of a large bank in Manhattan walks to the corner where a shoeshine man is always located.He sits on the couch, examines the Wall Street Journal, and the shoe shine man gives his shoes a shiny, excellent look. One morning the shoe shiner asks the CEO, “What do you think about the stock market?” The CEO asks in turn, arrogantly, “Why are you so interested in that - that topic?”

    “I have a million dollars in your bank,” the shoeshine man says, “and I'm
    >> considering investing some of the money in the market.”

    “What’s your name?” asks the Director. “John H. Smith ” The CEO arrives at the bank and asks Customer Relations, “Do we have a client named John H. Smith?”

    “Certainly,” answers the Customer Service Manager, “he has over million dollars in his account.”

    The CEO goes out, reapproaches the shoeshine man, and says, “Mr. Smith, might I ask you this coming Monday to be the guest of honor at our board meeting and tell us the story of your life. I am sure we will have something to learn from you.”

    At the board meeting, the CEO introduces him to the board members: “We all know Mr. Smith, proprietor of the shoe shine stand on the corner; but Mr. Smith is also our esteemed customer with a million dollars in his account. I’ve invited him to tell us the story of his life. I am sure we can learn from him.”

    Mr. Smith begins his story: “I came to this country fifty years ago as a young immigrant from Europe with an unpronounceable name. I got off the ship without a penny. The first thing I did was change my name to Smith. I was hungry and exhausted. I started wandering around looking for a job but to no avail. Suddenly I found a coin on the sidewalk. I bought an apple. I had two options: eat the apple and satisfy my hunger or start a business. I sold the apple for two dollars and bought two apples with the money. I also sold them and continued in business. When I started accumulating dollars, I was able to buy a set of used brushes and shoe polish and started polishing shoes. I didn't spend a penny on entertainment or clothing, I just bought bread and some cheese to survive. I saved penny by penny and after a while, I bought a new set of shoe brushes and ointments in different shades, and I expanded my clientele. I lived like a monk and saved penny by penny. Later, I was able to buy an armchair so that my clients could sit comfortably while their shoes were being polished, and that brought me more clients. I did not spend a penny on the joys of life. I kept saving every penny. “A few years ago, when the previous shoe shine man on the corner decided to retire, I had already saved enough money to buy his shoeshine location at this great place. “Finally, three months ago, my sister, who was a hooker in Chicago, passed away and left me a million dollars.”

    The end.


    Al

  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Hello, all!


    Well, despite the instability and unsurety in the world at large, this gardening season has been phenomenal. I've harvested more peppers, and sooner, than in any season previous. I actually began harvesting my first ripe superhot peppers in July!!!!


    We are back to "school,' now, but teaching virtually. It's a whole new landscape, with not a few hiccups along the way. Thermal scans every day when entering the buildings, and a strange silence on campus, with teachers hermited in classrooms but broadcasting live through Google Meet Up, speaking to a monitor of student faces.


    On top of all this, there are fires raging throughout California, and the air is thick with smoke, the skies grey and dun, save in the morning and evening when the baleful disc of the sun glows red-orange through the ash, lending a surreality to the entire experience.


    That's the news from here!







    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • four (9B near 9A)
    last year

    Al, the joke is great. I shoulda seen it coming (punch line).

    Greenman, what is the situation at Santa Rosa?

  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    I'm quite a distance from Santa Rosa, but the situation is bad. Mandatory evacuation in places, and over 125,000 acres burned between the three main fires.


    Josh

  • Emily
    last year

    Best wishes to all this school year! We opted to try one year of homeschool instead of sending our kids part-time or doing distance learning online through our school district. This should be interesting! But I do look forward to spending that time together.

    tapla thanked Emily
  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Hello, all! Thanks, Emily!


    Another big harvest of peppers over the weekend. Ghost peppers and Hungarian Wax. I'll smoke and dehydrate the Hungarians, then powder them into paprika.



  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last year

    Al,

    the Squill has six blooms right now. I've kept it in the greenhouse, sitting in a saucer of water that dries out every other day. Definitely needs to be repotted, as I can feel the bulbs through the sides of the container.




    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • four (9B near 9A)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Al, I have been using calcined diatomaceous earth ever since I read your mentions of it.

    An article about the experimental use of diatoms in the fabrication of small photovoltaic cells prompted me to learn more about diatoms themselves Just thought to share a bit with you and your readers here, according to my understanding and in my own words.

    A diatom is a one-celled alga ("cell" having different meaning, of course, from same word above). Its exterior, i.e. the wall of the cell, is hard, and often is called a shell. Holes allow intake and excretion. I conjecture that diatom capability of synthesizing light is what physicists hoped to exploit. Turns out that they used the shells as a structural material, as follows.

    Live diatoms were deposited onto the glass through which light enters; the living matter was removed to leave a coating of shells. Photons must enter through the shells' holes, making photons bounce around more than otherwise they would. As a result, in subsequent layers they strike more electrons, kicking them into action.

    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • four (9B near 9A)
    12 months ago
    last modified: 12 months ago



    Obviously his weight pulled the drawstring closed after he entered.

    I recalled the chickadee part of this discussion, above.

    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • mblan13
    11 months ago

    A ventriloquist is performing with his dummy on his lap. He’s telling a dumb-blonde joke when a young platinum-haired beauty jumps to her feet. “What gives you the right to stereotype blondes that way?” she demands. “What does hair color have to do with my worth as a human being?”

    Flustered, the ventriloquist begins to stammer out an apology.

    “You keep out of this!” she yells. “I’m talking to that little jerk on your knee!”

  • four (9B near 9A)
    11 months ago



  • tapla
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Thought I'd share a neat experience that occurred early this morning. I was walking around the bonsai benches where it's not all that unusual to see hummingbirds. Often, if I see them I'll turn on a mister and they'll happily dive bomb through the fine mist, looking like they are at play.

    This morning, I was holding a potentilla bonsai that had several blooms on it and pruning some of the too long shoots back. A humming bird flew up and started visiting the blooms. I froze and watched while contemplating whether or not I should move the several steps where the mister was set to drip and was dripping into a collection saucer that passes for a bird bath. Before I could decide, it flew to my ear and hovered there. The pulse from its wing beats were surprisingly strong against the side of my face and neck, and it tickled like crazy. Unfortunately, my reflexive reaction at being so startled was to jerk away, and away went the bird, leaving me to wonder if, had I staid still, would he have stuck that pointy beak in my ear.

    Al

  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    2 months ago

    What a great encounter, Al! I love the Hummer's...so inquisitive and adamant, I always greet them as Lieutenants come to inspect the troops.


    Here's an update for you. That Squill sent so many years ago, still blooming happily and splitting its pot. Long overdo for a new container and a bulb separation. Pic from last week when the blooms were just emerging.



    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • tapla
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    .... plain to see it likes how you treat it!

    Al

  • four (9B near 9A)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    >"would he have stuck that pointy beak in my ear" ___ Not a far-fetched thought.

    If ever it happened to anyone, it likely would have been to someone such as this:


    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • tapla
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I guess I'm safe.

    Al

  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    2 months ago

    @four (9B near 9A), I mean, if I had a beak, I probably would as well!


    Josh

    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • John (Zone 5b/6a, IN)
    2 months ago

    Since a lot of the people I've learned the most from are found throughout this thread, I want to say thank you.


    I've only browsing the GW (now Houzz for some time I think) forums for about a year now, +/- a couple months, and I still feel like a newcomer. After all, there are threads from the late 2000s that show a central cast of individuals who have been around taking questions, offering advice, sharing in the successes and offering empathetic support and solidarity in the losses. Sometimes I can't help but feel a bit sad when I find a thread from 2008 of people excitedly sharing and marveling over their newest project or a new way of growing they've just about tuned in only for it to go silent.


    However, there are a few people who have been around for a long time and continue to be valuable resources for individuals like myself. I grew up with parents and grandparents who gardened in a traditional sense and didn't think much of it, but they did try to offer the occasional nature-oriented book at the holidays as their expression of support, albeit without understanding my fascination. Since finding these forums, I've dove into growing headfirst and (much to my wife's chagrin) turned our shed and back room into storage for the dozens of pots, bags of bark, granite, perlite, oildri, and various propagation experiments.


    I owe a huge part of my current joy at what I've accomplished and what I look forward to accomplishing to this community. So thank you.


    Here's a photo from a few weeks ago. Everything I've learned helped me keep them alive in 5b/6a without a greenhouse and through the very wet summer we've had. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't proud of them.





    tapla thanked John (Zone 5b/6a, IN)
  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month

    Thanks for choosing this thread to offer a thank you to all who helped increase your proficiency as it relates to keeping plant material healthy in pots, John. You've obviously/ judiciously applied what you learned, as your plants bear witness.

    Al

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month

    Since peaches are in season, I thought you might like to know what you are ingesting.

    EVERYTHING, is composed of chemicals. The air we breath, the food we eat, the water we drink - chemicals.

    Al

  • four (9B near 9A)
    last month

    Point accepted as intended. (And breathers/eaters/drinkers are composed of chemicals.)

    For anyone who might care about the accuracy of the ingredients list, the most obvious problem is that sucrose and glucose and fructose are listed as peer ingredients. Truth is that sucrose is COMPOSED of fructose and glucose.

    tapla thanked four (9B near 9A)
  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month

    Indeed, we're all walking, talking, occasionally squawking, big bags of chemicals.

    Al

  • RoseMe SD
    last month

    How does diatomaceous earth deter ants and inch worms? Since you can't get the powder wet, how do you apply it to trees that you must water daily to get rid of pests?

  • greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
    last month

    Rose, you have to reapply it.

    As I understand it, DE cuts/destroys their breathing structures.


    Josh

    tapla thanked greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a
  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    It works on ants, but I'm doubting it would be effective on inchworms.

    Insect exposure to fine DE powder results in adsorption of fatty acids and their derivatives (lipids) from the protective wax on insect's exoskeleton (hard outer covering). Once the wax barrier is degraded, the increase in water vapor loss caused by the degradation often proves fatal to the insect by way of dehydration. Adsorption differs from absorption in that it describes the adhesive attraction of atoms/ molecules/ ions of liquids and gasses to a solid surface (cuticular waxes, like Vaseline are technically a liquid). When water coats the surface of DE particles adsorption is limited significantly, so DE is best used in dry environments which will predictably remain dry.

    It's interesting that when a single gregarious bug/ insect (ant, termite, bed bug, earwig, lady beetle, box elder beetle, stink bug .....) with an exoskeleton is exposed to powdered DE, transfer of the particles from those exposed to those not yet exposed can prove fatal to many others in the gathering place.

    Al

  • RoseMe SD
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @tapla , I read that DE especially food grade kind is safe for pets like cats and dogs. Could you confirm that? It is really important.
    Also, if DE is so effective against ants can I mix it with sugar to speed up the "poison" process to the colony?

  • RoseMe SD
    last month

    I have to add inchworms are mystery to me. They seem to drop out randomly from the sky to land on my plants.

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Food grade DE is said to be safe for pets, though it can be an irritant to you and/or your pets as it adsorbs oil from your and your pet's skin and irritates eyes, nasal and bronchial passages. Read directions and take proper precautions.

    Better to mix it with boric acid for the ants, though no harm in adding sugar. Sprinkle on anthills or areas frequented by ants on dry days.

    Inchworms DO fall from the sky, or at least from trees. Like spiders, they spin a silk strand which serves as a safety line as they move from trees where they spent the larval stage to the ground where they burrow into the soil and spin cocoons and pupate to emerge in fall or spring, depending on species.

    Al

  • RoseMe SD
    last month

    Deep watering question: what's the best time of the day to do deep watering of potted plants in a climate that has temperature between 58 and 88 all year around?
    If you don't need to deplete minerals (careful fertilization) is deep watering still necessary? How often?

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    When temps are above 80*F, it's best to water at the hottest part of the day, but avoid wetting foliage. When temps are below 80*, morning watering is best; and, though it's of less concern if you wet foliage in the morning because the water should have evaporated by evening, it's still best to try to avoid wetting foliage if possible. Fungal spores need a an incubation period during which the spores remain wet - no sense providing that side of the disease tetrahedron if you can avoid it.

    Also, as the dark period approaches, little openings in leaves (stomata) close, which limits the amount of water that can be taken up by roots. This adds a half day to the total amount of time it takes for any excess water in the container to be used and the grow medium returned to a healthier water:air ratio.

    I'm not sure what you're asking, re "deplete minerals (careful fertilization)".

    Al

  • RoseMe SD
    last month
    1. Maybe I misunderstood, I thought the point of deep watering is to flush out extra sodium and nitrogen from fertilization? So if I fertilize modestly, do flowering trees still need deep watering once a week? What for?
    2. what's your opinion of using Superthrive alternating with FoliagePro as weekly fertilizer?
    3. I just mulched all my flowering trees in pots without watering the soil first. Then I read it makes water hard to soak in soil? What should I do?
  • four (9B near 9A)
    last month
    last modified: last month

    >"(stomata) close, which limits the amount of water that can be taken up" ___ Fascinating. Is the mechanism, in effect, a plugging of the tip of a flow path for air and moisture?

  • tapla
    Original Author
    last month

    Mary & Four:

    1. Maybe I misunderstood, I thought the point of deep watering is to flush out extra sodium and nitrogen from fertilization? So if I fertilize modestly, do flowering trees still need deep watering once a week? What for? Grow media should be flushed regularly for 2 reasons, A) To limit the collective accumulation of all dissolved solids (DS) in the soil solution, primary sources being fertilizer salts and the DS in water used for irrigation. As the level of DS rises, it becomes increasingly difficult for the plant to take up water and the nutrients dissolved therein. The level of DS can eventually become so high that water is pulled out of cells by the same mechanism curing salt pulls moisture from curing meats. B) If not for regular flushing of the grow medium the ratio of nutrients, each to the others; can quickly become badly skewed, depending on how closely the % of each nutrient in the fertilizer matches the % at which the plant actually USES the nutrient. This causes antagonistic deficiencies, which occur when an excess of one nutrient causes an excess of 1 or more other nutrients. Some growers 'think' that using a high-P(hosphate) fertilizer for containerized plants increases bloom profusion, so they opt for a product like 10-52-10, which furnishes 13X the amount of P the average plant can/will use relative to its N uptake. P is a known antagonist of Fe (iron) so the first application of 10-52-10 can already affect Fe uptake. If the soil is not flushed between fertilizer applications, a residual excess of P remains in the soil where it combines with the second application. At that point, there is very likely >20X the amount of P in the medium as required and the plants are chlorotic as a result of the antagonistic deficiency of Fe. P is also an antagonist to several other nutrients, namely K (potassium), Zn (zinc), Ca (calcium), and Cu (copper).


    2. What's your opinion of using Superthrive alternating with FoliagePro as weekly fertilizer? The following is something I wrote. It was published by permission in Stemma Journal, an online magazine dedicated to growing hoya.

    Superthrive or Superjive

    The question regarding the value of Superthrive as a miracle tonic for plants is often bandied about in horticultural circles. Over the years, I had read claims that ranged from, “I put it on my plant, which had never bloomed, and it was in full bloom the next day.” to, “It was dead - I put Superthrive on it and the next day it was alive and beautiful, growing better than it ever had before.” I decided to find out for myself.

    If you look for information on the net, you will probably only find the manufacturer’s claims and anecdotal observations, both so in want of anything that resembles a control. Though my experiments were far from purely scientific, I tried to keep some loose controls in place so that I could make a fair judgment of its value, based my own observations. Here is what I did, what I found, and the conclusions I made about any value the product Superthrive might hold for me.

    On four separate occasions, I took multiple cuttings of plants in four different genera. In each case the group of cuttings were taken from the same individual plant to reduce genetic variance. The plant materials I used were: Ficus benjamina, (a tropical weeping fig) Luna apiculata (Peruvian myrtle), Chaenorrhinum minus (a dwarf snapdragon), and an unknown variety of Coleus. In each instance, I prepared cuttings from the same plant and inserted them in a very fast, sterile soil. The containers containing half of the cuttings were immersed/soaked in a Superthrive solution of approximately 1/2 tsp per gallon of water to the upper soil line. The other half of the cuttings were watered in with water only. In subsequent waterings, I would water the “Superthrive batch” of cuttings with a solution of 10 drops per gallon and the others with only water. The same fertilizer regimen was followed on both groups of cuttings. In all four instances, the cuttings that I used Superthrive on rooted and showed new growth first. For this reason, it follows that they would naturally exhibit better development, though I could see no difference in overall vitality, once rooted. I can also say that a slightly higher percentage of cuttings rooted that were treated with the Superthrive treatment at the outset. I suspect that is directly related to the effects of the auxin in Superthrive hastening initiation of root primordia before potential vascular connections were destroyed by rot causing organisms.

    In particular, something I looked for because of my affinity for a compact form in plants was branch (stem) extension. (The writer is a bonsai practitioner.) Though the cuttings treated with Superthrive rooted sooner, they exhibited the same amount of branch extension. In other words, internode length was approximately equal and no difference in leaf size was noted.

    As a second part to each of my “experiments”, I divided the group of cuttings that had not been treated with Superthrive into two groups. One of the groups remained on the water/fertilizer only program, while the other group was treated to an additional 10 drops of Superthrive in each gallon of fertilizer solution. Again, the fertilizer regimen was the same for both groups. By summer’s end, I could detect no difference in bio-mass or vitality between the two groups of plants.

    Since I replicated the above experiment in four different trials, using four different plant materials, I am quite comfortable in drawing some conclusions as they apply to me and my growing habits or abilities. First, and based on my observations, I have concluded that Superthrive does hold value for me as a rooting aid, or stimulant if you prefer. I regularly soak the soil, usually overnight, of my newly root-pruned and often bare-rooted repots in a solution of 1/2 tsp Superthrive per gallon of water. Second, and also based on my observations, I no longer bother with its use at any time other than at repotting. No evidence was accumulated through the 4 trials to convince me that Superthrive was of any value as a “tonic” for plants with roots that were beyond the initiation or recovery stage.

    Interestingly, the first ingredient listed as being beneficial to plants on the Superthrive label is vitamin B-1 (or thiamine). Growing plants are able to synthesize their own vitamin B-1 as do many of the fungi and bacteria having relationships with plant roots, so it's extremely doubtful that vitamin B-1 could be deficient in soils or that a growing plant could exhibit a vitamin B-1 deficiency.

    Some will note that I used more of the product than suggested on the container. I wanted to see if any unwanted effects surfaced as well as trying to be sure there was ample opportunity for clear delineation between the groups. I suspect that if a more dilute solution was used, the difference between groups would have been even less clear.

    It might be worth noting that since the product contains the growth regulator (hormone) auxin, its overuse can cause defoliation, at least in dicots. The broad-leaf weed killer Weed-B-Gone and the infamous “Agent Orange“, a defoliant that saw widespread use in Viet Nam, are little more than synthetic auxin.

    3. I just mulched all my flowering trees in pots without watering the soil first. Then I read it makes water hard to soak in soil? What should I do? Probably nothing, but then, you didn't mention what you mulched with. Unless the mulch compacts to form a barrier impenetrable or the material is/becomes hydrophobic (water repellent) when it dries, it won't make water absorption by the medium and more difficult than it would be w/o the mulch.

    *****************************************************************************

    >"(stomata) close, which limits the amount of water that can be taken up" ___ Fascinating. Is the mechanism, in effect, a plugging of the tip of a flow path for air and moisture? Yes. When plants wilt due to over-watering and the oxygen deprivation that comes with it, they usually regain some or all of their turgidity as they enter and throughout the dark phase, as stomata are closed then. When I suspect over-watering as the cause of wilting, the question I ask is whether or not the plant partially or fully regains turgidity at night. If yes, it pretty much confirms over-watering as causal.

    Al

Sponsored
Alpha Centauri Group
Average rating: 5 out of 5 stars5 Reviews
Loudoun Kitchen & Bath Remodeling & Designs for Everyday Living