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redherring89

Schefflera pueckleri (Tupidanthus calyptratus)

redherring89
12 years ago

I have a healthy, large, 25-year-old, 20+-foot Schefflera pueckleri outside my Los Angeles apartment window that provides good (and necessary) shade and requires little maintenance. My landlady has decided that the tree is too big and too close to the building and is sure it will damage the foundation of the building. She wants to cut it down even though there is no evidence of any damage to the building or nearby sidewalk. Several tenants and I are campaigning to save the tree.

Are Schefflera pueckleri known to buckle sidewalks and foundations? Is there any danger maintaining one very close (one foot) to a building? Any recommendations to help me fight this fight?

Thanks.

Comments (4)

  • tsugajunkie z5 SE WI ♱
    12 years ago

    If the tenants get together and tell her the shade was a major reason to rent there,well, money talks.

    tj

  • philinsydney1
    12 years ago

    Scheffleras are pretty notorious for having powerful roots that uplift pavements; at least, the one that is native to Australia is (the "umbrella tree")

  • ariel_rootz
    12 years ago

    Tupidanthus?

    I Love it, Love it, Love it!

    But unfortunately, I have to say that I have seen the superficial roots of the one in my courtyard raise a 3' concrete paver over 24" within 7 years.

    May I suggest instead of removing the tree; excavate against the building's foundation (to the very bottom) and insert steel plating? Nowadays, scrap metal businesses have a ton of it. The question is: Is the expense worth it?

    I'm from the old school and adhere to the idea of not severely topping trees; (just an occasional trim)...severe topping seems to make the roots more invasive. ...I'd like to hear other people's opinions, though.

    And to the person who thinks they shed too much; I'd rather pick up a handful of large leathery leaves every other day over having to rake or blow thousands of tiny ones. My tree's beauty and shade are worth it to me, but to each their own, no?

    Good luck, fellow tree lovers!

  • bahia
    12 years ago

    It is more likely to damage the sidewalk over a foundation, and if there are no signs of damage up until now, it may not be likely to cause any in future, but they are strongly surface rooting, and they can cause damage. The suggestion to add a root barrier up against the foundation is a practical one, but would involve a lot of digging and there may not be the room if the trunks are really only a foot away from the wall.

    I hope your landlord relents, good luck...