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bob740

Dyckia marnier lapostollei

bob740
16 years ago

This Dyckia seems to have some variations in its appearence,from photos I've seen in various publications,and web sites. There is a var.estevesii,as shown on the FCBS site,but other than that,there are differences in some plants leaves,and especially the spine size and spacing.Stephania had posted some pics earlier this year that showed this. Anyone else have some photos ? My two look a little different from one another as well.

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Comments (29)

  • stephania
    16 years ago

    Hey friends, Who have the 'Giant form' of this plant, I have heard about this clone as in the inventory list of Tropiflora, I'ld like to see it.

    As I have a plant named Dyckia marnier-lapostollei var. estevesii that I got from Dutch Vandervort, which I've noted some distinguished characters from the typical one - smaller size plant, thinner and tapering leaves with finer and longer leaf's spines, also coarser-grained texture...yet more expensive -

    Anyways, beyond a great variation, there are also some typical plants which have an affinis character with var. estevesii too, but still not identical.

    Just a joke..this plant should be named Dyckia diversifolia or Dyckia heterophylla !!
    Please forgive me Madame Marnier!

  • bob740
    Original Author
    16 years ago

    Hello again.Today I had an opportunity to take some photos at the BBG [Buffalo Botanical Gdn's]where I tend the broms and ferns,as one of the volunteers.The two Dyckia M.L's there are growing under the same conditions,yet vary quite a bit.The one on the left has a rosy tone,the other the normal grey.Located in the cactus house,they receive all day sun,and little watering. Still,they do well,but differ in appearence. Bob
    {{gwi:477571}}

  • LisaCLV
    16 years ago

    The one on the left in your second picture looks kind of stressed out, Bob. They may be grown under the same conditions but I'll bet the roots of the one on the right are either healthier or getting more water. It could be the size of the pot. Dyckias like a lot of root room. They don't do well underpotted like the epiphytes do, and they don't like to be dry. D. marnier-lapostollei can take it a bit drier than some of the other species, but still...

    Having said that, there are a lot of differences, particularly among seed-grown plants, in the size and shape of the spines, amount of curvature and overlap of leaves, spine impressions, amount of silver scurf, etc. If they were all vegetatively propagated from the same clone you shouldn't see that, but if you get them from different sources or a source that grows them from seed you will see slight variations.

  • bob740
    Original Author
    16 years ago

    Ah so, lots of good info there Lisa. I'm going to check out the roots of both on my next day at the gardens. Maybe repot the little one. If the stressed one's roots were placed in water for a time,do you think that would help the recovery,and obtain new root growth ? Thanks. Bob

  • LisaCLV
    16 years ago

    I don't think I'd soak the roots in water, Bob. That's kind of like going from one extreme to the other. Maybe Stephania or Bihai will have some suggestions. They both grow them a lot better than I do.

  • bromeliaddict
    16 years ago

    I've got a nice specimen that I've had for 2 years now. Advice from a friend in Louisiana was to grow it wet in the summer time. I've been pleased with the results so far. I also find that my terrestrials- Dyckias, Deuterocohnias, Orthophytums- grow more successfully when I give them plenty of root room. I would suggest that the smaller specimen that Bob has pictured is ready for a pot 2-3 inches larger than what it is currently growing in. I'll post a photo of my plant as soon as I figure how to do it. Paul

  • stephania
    16 years ago

    Hi all,

    That's right, even in the same condition, some plant turn red while some remain white.

    And ...Bob I root my Dyck successfully in small pellet size pumice that I keep it moist all the time.

    This is my red clone
    {{gwi:477572}}

    Another typical one on the same bench
    {{gwi:477573}}

  • bob740
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    [Reprise]
    Lisa,Paul,& Stephania. Well,I did take your advice,and on the next visit to the Bot.Gdns.,I repotted the little stressed one.So one month later,here is the updated photo of the same plant,and I think its looking better,do you agree,or am I just wishing ? To my eyes,the leaves seem to be less curled toward the tips. Bob

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  • LisaCLV
    15 years ago

    It looks happier to me, Bob. Looking at the original picture you can see the leaves almost rolling into tubes, and just an overall shrivelled look to the whole plant, compared to it's big juicy neighbor. It doesn't look shrivelled any more. Of course you can't undo the browned tips but it will outgrow that when it gets more leaves on it. I think you made the right move!

  • bromeliaddict
    15 years ago

    Bob, I can see that it is definitely perking up. My only concern is that as you get a full rosette of leaves, they're going to shed most of the water over the edge of the pot. You could easily go up another pot size and I think the plant would be even happier for it. I really should consider doing it for my own specimen. By the way, here is the photo of mine that I promised. Paul

  • Patris
    15 years ago

    Here is a picture of my Dyckia Platyphylla. Had her planted here for the last 2 summers and started out with 1 lone plant. I think she's happy here.

    {{gwi:477575}}

    This is one I got at Yucca Do last year in the fall. I seemed to have lost the name so cannot share that with ya'll. This one is grown in filtered light under a tree, where as the other is grown in full sun.

    {{gwi:477576}}

  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Hi Patris, I think you might link the wrong image, as the first one is an Aloe (a nice one but not Bromeliad) and the second is Dyckia platyphylla.

  • Patris
    15 years ago

    Well, duh. Sorry about that. Now I know where the tag went to!

    Told ya'll I was still learning!
    Patris

  • bob740
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    Hi Patris, I believe the photo of your Dyckia platyphylla obtained from Yucca Do, is the one called 'Silver Sheen'. A pic of it from their catalog follows.Now you can make a tag. Bob

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  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Bob...I think Patris's plant is the true Dyckia platyphylla, but kept in light shade that why it seem paler. Note from its glossy leave texture, while 'Silver Sheen' (Yucca Do's plant is not the same as FCBS 'Silver Sheen' please take a look too!!) has more dusty sparkling.

    Here, at the left corner and the bottom is Dyckia that Yucca Do call 'Silver Sheen', and two at the right corner is Dyckia platyphylla

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  • bromeliaddict
    15 years ago

    One last try to post a photo of my Dyckia m.l. I don't know what happened to the link on my previous post. but I'm enjoying all the photos in this thread. What a cool collection, Stephania!

  • bob740
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    OK,Stephania,you are right about Patris's plant being the normal platyphylla.The coloring is similar,but the leaves have a shine to them that Silver Sheen does not. Good eye !
    And FYI, there is an update on fcbs for another Brazilian Enchorlirium,that adds a new plant to the genus,called reflexum. It looks similar to 'Vau',and you can enlarge the photo thats on the site to see it better than the one I'm attaching here.
    Bob {{gwi:477579}}

  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Hey...thanks Bob, the pic in FCBS you mentioned is really cool.
    And my babies of Encholirium sp. 'Vau' are quite doing well. I've given them few more hour of bright light and also weekly of foliar-feed. Have you ordered the seed from Tarrington yet?

    Anyway, I've contacted Tarrington yet. I'ld like to get some more of Deuterocohnia bevifolia var. chlorantha, as he collected plant from different habitats by himself, his clone is quite unique.

    Talk about the 'platyphylla/ brevifolia' relative..I got a seedling of Dyckia hybrid from Bill Bakerlast year..it now becomes a nice plant, look like a silver green serries of this relative. Here it is.(a clump on the back is Dyckia brevifolia)

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  • Patris
    15 years ago

    Stephania, what is that lemon lime beauty in the middle? Love that color combo.
    Patris

  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Patris, I think Mr Bill Baker didn't name his hybrid seedlings.
    Actually, in that shipment, the 'Lemon Lime' (good name !)
    came along with another one, please take a look, it ought to be a neat one, I think.

    {{gwi:477583}}

  • Patris
    15 years ago

    Now that one got my attention! Love that rich dark color and white spines against that really make it pop.
    Is that a hybrid also?
    I am still mesmerized by that Lemon Lime.

    If you don't mind me asking, why are they not named?
    Patris

  • bromeliaddict
    15 years ago

    Patris is right! That one is certainly worthy of a name. Now, another "final" try to post my photo of D. marnier-lapostollei. Paul
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  • LisaCLV
    15 years ago

    Stephania, I think the one Patris is talking about is your D. brevifolia 'Yellow Glow'. You posted that one previously (see link). It makes such a nice contrast to the darker-foliaged ones, and as always, you grow them so well!

    That last hybrid looks a bit like some F2s of 'Richard Kaz' that I have. Judging by the spines, I'd say it has marnier-lapostollei in it.

    As to why some hybrids aren't named, It's up to the hybridizer to decide whether they want to name something, and it usually has to be something fairly distinct that they want to propagate. Otherwise they'll just put the names of the parents on the tag, assuming they know that. Sometimes tags get lost or people don't keep records, but it's still a pretty plant.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Yellow Glow

  • bob740
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    Very nice pics Stephania. Regarding Patris's asking about the 'lemon-lime' one in the middle...isn't that your Dyckia 'Moon Glow' [or Yellow Glow] version of D. brevifolia?
    And re: 'Silver Sheen',here is a pic of my YuccaDo plants,of 'Silver Sheen' on the left,and the species platyphylla on the right. My 'S.S.'looks like Patris' plant. And mine is not greyish,like yours is.Did you get yours from YuccaDo? Do you think mine is not a 'Silver Sheen'?.And mine does'nt look like the SS on the fcbs site either. What do I have here ? Bob
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  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Sorry Patris...I had been confused by the thread LOL,
    if you mean the plant which Lisa made a link, that it is
    Dyckia 'Yellow Glow' that I'd posted previously.

    Hey Paul, nice specimen and must be a big one!
    I noticed that you put a water-dish under your pot,
    does it not cause any problems ? I mean too wet,
    or this is a trick for making a good looking Dyckia.

    Again, Thanks Lisa for your opinions. I agree with you that
    the drak color hybrid of Bill Baker should have D. marnier-lapostollei in it.

    Bob, I think our growth condition make the plants look a bit different.
    May be my tropical direct sun, 6-8 hours without any protection or filter,
    make my 'Silver Sheen' more greyish, and also my Platyphylla turn dark.
    I'm quite sure we have the same plant.

    This is as you start the thread, the variation...

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  • bob740
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    Stephania,your purple hued Dyckia,the Bill Baker hybrid,looks similar to the fcbs pic of D.marnier-lapostolle var.estevesii,except for the color. Could be it was crossed with one that gave it the different coloration.
    In any case,it sure is an excellent specimen. Bob
    {{gwi:477588}}
    Thank you to fcbs for the photo.

  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Yes Bob, I think so, as I have a small clump of Dyckia marnier-lapostollei var. estevesii
    ( a clone from Dutch Vandervort) the spine shape is look alike that of Bill Baker hybrid.

  • bromeliaddict
    15 years ago

    Stephania, It was the recommendation of a friend/grower in Louisiana that suggested that the Dyckia marnier-lapostollei responds well to lots of water during the hot summer growing season. I can't argue, given the results I've had so far. Though, I would warn against too much water resting in the leaf axils for an extended period. I have a friend who has reported losing a couple of plants to leaf rot that way.
    I do grow the plant somewhat drier doing the cool winter growing period. BTW, for reference, my plant is growing in an 8 inch pot. So it's not too huge, just lots of leaves!

  • stephania
    15 years ago

    Hey Bob & Paul, this is my Dyckia marnier-lapostollei var. estevesii, closer pic and then comparing to its giant relative (2 feet wide!), a clone of DML. that I call a nick name "Tsunami" as it remind me of the tsunami which hit our Andaman coast last two year.

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