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boca_joe

Hardy Citchangsha/citrandarin in zone 7a - Northern VA!

We harvested the first fruit in early December, what a surprise!

Our fruit was a rich tangerine color just like a tangerine inside and the color of an orange outside.
* Relatively small pores , smooth skin on a round, golf ball sized
fruit.
* Here's the interesting part: the peel/zest had a definite
sweet orange taste with no trace of bitterness, in fact when I first
tasted the rind, I thought of orange marmalade- it was that
pleasant/sweet and orangey.
* _*The pulp tastes more like a mandarin or tangerine than anything
else, maybe a hint of lemon, not quite as sweet as a tangerine, more sour, but
definitely NOT bitter at all.
No trifoliate taste to speak of in the pulp or the rind!

With quite a bit of research and the expert input of several citrus hybridizers, we are pretty confident that this is what it is based on our taste test and where we got it and from whom.

This tree was planted in 2007, about 1' tall and now about 15'. It has experienced lows of near 0f at least once since planting and several single digit nights with no noticable damage or any dieback.

We have 18 seeds germinated from the fruit and are going to try grafting some wood this spring.

Pretty exciting for us here in zone 7 for a citrus this hardy and this tasty!

photos and videos here. Please disregard the references to citrumelo in the video- long story.

Boca Joe

Here is a link that might be useful: hardy sweet citrus in Northern VA, zone 7a

Comments (59)

  • foxd
    9 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Where can I purchase a Citrandarin tree? I've been lsearching on the web with no success.

  • Boca_Joe(zone 7b) southern Delaware
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Foxd

    I don;t know where you could buy one. we stumbled on this one. We hope to try some cuttings and possibly grafting this summer.

    Boca Joe

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    9 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    If you are looking for Citrandarin, please contact Stan McKenzie, the Citrus Man in South Carolina. You can Google him. He might be able to graft one for you.

    By the way, if anyone is still following this thread, the Citrandarin tree is loaded with flowers and developing fruits now in the Spring of 2013! So, if warm weather holds late into the Fall, there MAY be a bumper crop.

  • persianmd2orchard
    8 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    How do I sign up and join the northern VA hardy citrus club??? I am really interested in this! I am in northern VA and the hardy citrus bug is biting me :).

  • tcamp30144(7B N.ATLANTA)
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Can you please send me a fruit

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    For what it's worth, the 'hardy' citrandarin plant in Sterling has died way down after this winter from hell. So, no fruit or blooms for many years off this plant ... if it recovers.

  • Boca_Joe(zone 7b) southern Delaware
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The tree is strongly regrowing from the bottom. We took several cuttings from fruiting wood last summer and a few are even blooming this year!

    This tree is a USDA 852 seedling , so it is not grafted , so it will be 100% true from the regrowth.

    Just took this photo last week. One tough tree.

    Boca Joe

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Glad to see it has survived. Thanks for posting Joe.

  • katiebeth128_wv_6b
    4 years ago

    I know it has been quite some time since the last post on this thread, but Boca Joe, thank you for the interesting posts on this citrus plant - I live in WV (6B) and have been researching cold hardy citrus for some time and stumbled upon this thread. Would you be willing to trade or send seeds? I would be happy to pay for postage and/or trade other seeds with you - I have tons of different heirloom vegetables and fruits in particular.

  • Joe S
    4 years ago

    I have no seeds till this fall, maybe, when the fruit ripen.

  • Laura LaRosa (7b)
    4 years ago

    Joe, I live in Annapolis and am very excited to see how successful you have been with your tree and your description of its flavor. Do you mind posting an update on how it has weathered since your original post? Also, where did you get the tree from?

  • bklyn citrus (zone 7B)
    4 years ago

    too few posts of this nature lately, I do wonder why

  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    4 years ago

    Boca If I understand this. You did the cross pollination to develop this sweet cold hardy citrus fruit. Either way I say congrads on your hard work and patients.

    6b Steve

  • Joe S
    4 years ago

    Thanks for all the comments. The original plant is prob usda 852 , Dave got the tree at the citrus expo in Virginia beach in about 2006 or 2007. Steve, We did not do any cross pollination. The original tree has since died but Dave had taken cuttings and at least one bloomed this spring. The thing that made this so different for us was the lack of that horrible trifoliate turpentine/skunk taste..lol.

  • Joe S
    4 years ago

    Laura see comment above for answers to your questions.

  • 0webuser_27967133520
    3 years ago

    Are there any news? How do the cuttings?

  • Joe S
    3 years ago

    Dave Klemm has 2 cuttings about 4' high in pots. They have fruit this year! He has not planted in the ground, inside the garage for winter.

    I just planted a small plant in the ground zone 7b southern Delaware, we'll see what happens.

    Joe

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    3 years ago

    Joe, glad you responded. I did not understand the questions.

  • jenny_in_se_pa
    3 years ago

    Joe S - how has your plant done with all the rain the past couple months? I am north of you in the Philly area and we have been inundated but it seems down your way has taken the brunt!

  • Joe S
    3 years ago

    actually the rain has not affected it in the least. Looks good.

  • 0webuser_27967133520
    3 years ago

    Do you think you plant is US 852 or is it a seedling of it?

  • Joe S
    3 years ago

    No way to be 100% sure, but yes, most likely US 852

  • 0webuser_27967133520
    3 years ago

    Are the fruits sweet? I think I read it somewhere. In Europe all plants of US852 are producing inedible fruits as far as I know. Only for enthusiasts...

    Mikkel

  • 0webuser_27967133520
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I just checked my supposed US852. Leaves look different from yours. I`ll try to post a picture later.


    Mikkel

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Leaves are trifoliate but fruiting terminal branches can occasionally have a few bifoliate or unifoliate leaves.

    I would say if the fruit is left to ripen completely (nearly falling from the tree), then squeezed, diluted and with sweetener added, it can make a fair mandarin-ade drink. Fruit usually ripens by late November to December -- often too long past our first hard frost. Fruit is fairly large and very full of juice.

    But I would not eat the fruit out of hand. It has trifoliate overtones. In fact, my wife commented she could smell it after I cut into it.

  • 0webuser_27967133520
    3 years ago

    Thanks! It looks little bit different from mine. Mine is blooming right now but leaves are trifoliate until the top. Only some are monofoliate but more on the bottom of the plant. Here is link to someone who had it for 12 years in his garden. He is next to Hamburg northern Germany. Finally it got killed in a very harsh winter around 2011 or 12.

    http://zitrusgarten.net/homepage/bilder-c/a852.htm


    Mikkel

  • socalnolympia
    3 years ago

    This is a picture of a fairly large citrumelo tree growing in Winston-Salem, central North Carolina (zone 7b)



    credit to Bob Snyder for the pictures of his tree

  • bklyn citrus (zone 7B)
    3 years ago

    Ever try a fruit?

  • Betsy
    last year

    Hi, I'm another very late comer. I just purchased two young Citrandarins and I'm getting some mixed messages from reading this thread. Are the fruits useful and worth growing?

  • Silica
    last year

    Depending on the citrandarin variety (the cross) it can be sweet or sour.

  • Betsy
    last year

    Can you expand on that?


  • Silica
    last year

    A citrandarin is a cross between a mandarin and a trifoliate orange. There are many different mandarins so there can be many different types of citrandarins. Some have a acidic sweet taste and some are just plain sour.

  • Betsy
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Mine is changshi

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    last year

    Betsy, are you saying your plant is a Changsha? If so, that's pure mandarin and worth growing. Are you growing in the ground or in a pot?

  • Betsy
    last year
    last modified: last year

    My Citrandarin is Changsha x Poncirus. (852) I'm wondering what sort of flavor to expect. Currently it is in a pot. I intend to grow it in the ground.

  • Betsy
    last year

    I'm wondering if it seems to be an ornament only that perhaps I should sell it and buy a pure Changsha Mandarin since I am in zone 7a.


  • Silica
    last year

    If you want a high quality/good tasting fruit, then sell it and grow something else.

  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    last year
    last modified: last year

    You could try a honey Chansha on Flying dragon rootstock. or a Clem-yuz 2-2but not 3-3. Any tree you get will have to rippen its ruit before your temps drop below 28F or the fruit will be destroyed.

    Steve

  • Betsy
    last year

    I'm not sure anything else will grow for me in zone 7a.


  • socalnolympia
    last year
    last modified: last year

    trying to grow pure Changsha in zone 7a would be a stretch, most likely it's not going to work out, but you may have a chance in zone 7b (especially the warmer half of zone 7b) if you live in the South.

    I have tasted the fruit of what I believe was a Morton citrange. The fruit entirely looked like a delicious orange, very inviting, but biting into it it had an awful flavor that I can only describe as putrid, and it made me want to immediately spit it out. I was told there was one other person who tasted it that found it to taste acceptably edible and could eat it.

    From what I have researched, I think many other Poncirus hybrids don't taste as bad as this Morton citrange, though they usually do tend to have a similar flavor.

    As for the US 852 hybrid, I have seen a video where a guy said he was even able to manage to enjoy eating them. Though I suspect he probably had more "adventurous" tastes that many people.

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    last year

    I wouldn’t expect much from US 852 as far as flavor. Also it may die back in zone 7 during vortex years.

  • Betsy
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Perhaps I need a Prague Citsuma instead?

    For zone 7A?

    I'm aware of a nearby neighbor who is growing a Yuzu over winter unprotected. We don't get much polar vortex in Utah. Nothing like the midwest and back east.

  • Betsy
    last year

    Temperatures around here seldom drop lower than 10F. Maybe once every ten years. Our winters are generally in the low 20's only. They dip to the teens one or two nights a year sometimes.


  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    last year

    I am zone 6b and my citrus tree can survive over winter but the cool windy spring desiccates them and kills them before they can come out. 4 m0nths is about their limit and a short winter is 5.5 months. How long does your cold season last.

    Steve

  • socalnolympia
    last year
    last modified: last year

    poncirusguy, sometimes the cold damage does not manifest itself until things start to warm up. I'm not sure what you are seeing is really caused by dessication, since I am in a climate with very wet winters and early springs, and I have seen this.

  • Betsy
    last year

    I’m not sure what is considered cold. We get 4 months of freezing Dec, Ian, Feb, March.



  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Probably when soil is less than 60F. I lose soil temperature by late October and regain around may 1st. If your most sensitive trees are budding out or with good foliage the other 8 months then a cold hardy citrus tree will do good if it is on PT of FD roots.

    .

    Steve

  • Betsy
    last year

    Pt root is Poncirus root. Is that correct?


  • herman zimmerman
    last year

    Yes, Poncirus trifoliata.

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