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hostapumpkinman

Hosta Alphabet Y and Z

hostapumpkinman
11 years ago

The end is here.Thanks to all who posted pics and to everyone else for looking and the nice comments.I do not have any pics of Y's or Z's to contribute.Phil

Comments (24)

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Phil, thanks for keeping this going.

    yingeri - 2nd year

    Paul

  • luvtosharedivs
    11 years ago

    This has been fun!
    But it got me in trouble...adding more to my wish list...then ordering more...darn you enablers;)

    Not a great pic of Zounds...a little mud splashed from a recent heavy rain:

    Julie

  • hosta_freak
    11 years ago

    I have no Y's,but here is a pic of Zounds. Phil

    {{gwi:943758}}

  • squirejohn zone4 VT
    11 years ago

    Yellow river - New 2010{{gwi:943759}}

    Zippty Do Dah 2009 Hates even a little sun
    {{gwi:943760}}

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    Hostas? Ugggh! Buggy, slug magnets, messy in fall, never grow as lush as the catalog pics, worthless flowers, etc. Why would anyone spend money on these things? I've been attracted to the huge variety of leaves.........color, size, textures and variegation, and I've bought at least 15 types over the past several years, but they never grow as strong as they need to to survive a long time. The second year, if I was lucky, they would sprout a sick two or three leaves, and then die. So many other plants to use in the garden that I have given up on hostas.

  • in ny zone5
    11 years ago

    bill_ri,
    hostas as any other plant have certain site requirements - deep humus rich soil, water and not too much sun or shade. I.e. same as for rhododendrons. At least that is my experience. Fighting insects, that you have to do for all plants, even for grass. Messy in fall? Their leaves will die and dry up and you simply pull them off, very easy. Moneywise they are inexpensive when you calculate $/sqft of coverage. They are also labor saving because you will have less weeds once they are established.

    Your problem might be that you bought very small plants, and possibly did not water them enough. I noticed that with very small plants I have more early failures. I bought 100 different plants over the last 2 years. Before that I had 150 hostas of about 35 older common types and they were established large plants with little work required over the last 10 years, so this can be done, and I am looking forward to have my 100 new varieties become bushy in 5 years.
    Good luck, and have patience!
    Bernd

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    Berndby,

    I have good soil, where peonies, camellias, rhododendrons, astilbe, roses, campanula etc. all do well, not to mention so many others. I have tried several locations, some with mostly shade, others with more sun. A few of the plants were not huge, but not the really small ones either. But most were mature (=$$$) because I wanted them to succeed. As for the bugs, the only real problem was with snails and slugs, which love to hide amongst and eat the leaves. I know there are people who are absolutely crazy about hostas. When I go to England the gardens there love to feature their collections. I suppose it's one of those things that has just evaded me. I've switched my interest to xeriscaping now and am collecting cacti, succulents, rock garden and drought-tolerant plants.

  • thisismelissa
    11 years ago

    Sounds to me like you might have planted them too deeply.

    This forum is chock full of people who are absolutely crazy about hostas. Myself being one of them. If they don't work for you, then you can, as you have, move onto something else. I, personally, do not get along well with Astilbe, so I've moved on and admire them in others' gardens and keep my cynicism/skepticism about the plant to myself.

    I am a bit insulted by your statement Why would anyone spend money on these things. This board is INCREDIBLY helpful in diagnosing issues in growing hosta, but it's probably not the best way to start out on the forum by insulting a plant that we all love enough to want to frequent this board, even when there's a LOT of snow on the ground. May I respectfully suggest that if you would like the help of people here on the forum that start a new thread, describe your experiences and ask for help.

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    Thisismelissa,

    I think that's exactly what I did. I described my experiences with hostas. No cynicism or skepticism, but just relating what has happened. In no way was it meant as criticism of anyone who loves these plants. Perhaps I should have said "I don't care to spend any more money on them." rather than the question "Why would anyone spend money on these things?" I did also say that I had been attracted to the wide variety of colors, textures, sizes, etc. But after many tries and several hundred dollars, I could only wonder why they were so popular given my failures. I am an experienced gardener and I have success with roses, peonies, jasmines, camellias, clerodendron, azaleas, irises, gardenias and more. Just something about hostas where they just don't flourish.

    As for planting too deeply, I bought mature plants for the most part so they had established the proper level in their containers, and I planted them at the level they had been growing at.

    Enjoy your success with them.

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Time to move on from the troll

    Zuzu's Petals - from tour garden last summer

    Zodiac - from tour garden last summer

    Zounds - from tour gardens last summer

    Yesterday's Memories - 2nd year

    Paul

  • donrawson
    11 years ago

    Paul,

    What kind of grass is that with Zodiac? It looks like the perfect companion plant, and really complements the hosta.

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Don, I took the picture during the AHS garden tours (Larsen Garden), so I have no idea. Hopefully someone here can help.

    Paul

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    Paul,
    You ought not call someone who came here for advice a troll. You obviously took my first post as serious instead of as tongue-in-cheek as it clearly was. Sorry if so many hosta lovers are so sensitive, but if I offended any of you, then I apologize. But don't call me a troll, OK?

  • countrygarden01
    11 years ago

    Hi,
    I guess there is hope for H.'Zodiac'. Nice picture.

    The "grass" looks like Carex, judging by the form and seedhead. I don't think it is a nuiscance.

    Another grass I would hate to be w/o, which is similar in form and texture is Sporobolus 'Prairie Dropseed'. Both kinds look best in mass plantings where the architectural features are enhanced.

    Rick

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Bill, if you are not a troll, I apologize. Though you surely posted to get a rise out of this forum and I don't see where you were asking for advice - tongue in cheek or not. More like telling us what you thought of hosta. So maybe troll-like.....;)

    Start a discussion, ask a question, ask for help....I have learned a lot in this forum from a very knowledgeable group who share very openly their experience.

    Paul

  • hosta_freak
    11 years ago

    Geez,Bill,you ought to move to Arizona! I understand they have a lot of Cacti,Succulents,and drought-tolerant plants there. We here at the HOSTA forum prefer the plants we love! Phil

  • uk-hostaman
    11 years ago

    WOWWW....really love 'zodiac'...oh god not another one on the wish list!

  • donrawson
    11 years ago

    Yeh, that Zodiac just glows...what a beauty! It's a Richland Gold sport...and as low as $8 according to the 2010 Hosta Finder.

    I just love the color combination of yellow with a wavy white margin. Anyone else have a pic of Zodiac?

    Below are some hostas which may be similar, having a yellow leaf with a white margin:
    American Dream
    Fragrant Bouquet
    Joshua's Banner
    Lakeside April Snow
    Moon Glow
    Paradise Standard
    Rainbow's Sun Power
    Sea Dream
    Sunshine Glory
    Sweetie

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    Paul,
    Perhaps I should have been more straightforward and asked for advice rather than trying to make it lighthearted. I really didn't expect anyone to take that seriously, but it seems I was wrong. I see where someone started a new thread ("Why would anyone spend money on these things?") that was obviously in response to my comments. In that thread they suggest that I shouldn't be a gardener, or even that I move to Arizona! Tough crowd! :-)

    The fact is that I have been an avid gardener for many, many years and I do grow a wide variety of things, many of which would be considered a challenge in New England such as gardenia, jasmine and camellias. Of course there are all the garden regulars (iris, roses, daylilies, epidmedium, yucca and much more. Just can't seem to make hostas happy!

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Bill- Hosta, to paraphrase Ken from this forum ....will live on the driveway with little or no soil.. forever ...the only way to lose a hosta..is pay $100 for a rare one..and it will die on the way home....

    In general, hosta grow very well with little help. They like some morning sun if they can it, grow well in light shade, but in deep shade most will struggle to thrive. Water is the one thing that seems to help the most for my zone 4 garden - leaves are bigger and more of them with regular water.

    Here is a pic of Gold Standard after years of ignoring and again after regular watering

    Check out the link below for hostaholic gardens from the 2010 American Hosta Society garden tours - quite a variety of garden styles.

    BTW, the 2011 tours will be in New England this June. They rotate and it will likely be 10 years before back to New England again.

    Bill, this is a very active forum, especially as things get a growing. Welcome.

    Paul

    ps Phil, sorry for highjacking your thread.

    Here is a link that might be useful: AHS Garden Tours 2011 pics

  • paul_in_mn
    11 years ago

    Bottom link should of said... AHS Garden Tours 2010 Pics.

    Paul

  • swmogardens
    11 years ago

    Bill, your garden sounds nice. Please post some pictures. Maybe we can figure out how you can use hostas in your landscape. It may be something as simple to fix as voles eating the roots from below.

  • bill_ri_z6b
    11 years ago

    I will try to post some photos, but my whole property is in a state of change. Last year I had all new masonry walls, stairs, planters and patios built. Trying to make my chores easier for medical reasons. Unfortunately I also had to have a large wild maple tree removed, since it was right on the property line and had never been cared for. The entire center was rotted and it presented a lot of danger, not to mention the mess. Many plants and shrubs had to be moved to temporary locations as well. But I have some photos of the back garden which has not been affected. As soon as I can gather them I'll post a link.

  • harryshoe zone6 eastern Pennsylvania
    11 years ago

    Paul,
    The grass with Zodiac. Landscapers always recommend variance between leaf form and texture. I can't make logical sense out of it but it sure holds true for my eye. Ferns do the same with hosta.

    Bill,
    I find hosta to be one of the easiest plants I have ever tried to grow here in zone 6.