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lisarichardsvt

Trillium in the Monadnock region of NH

LisaNH
15 years ago

We cleared a previously wooded area to use as sheep pasture, and there are bunches of trillium coming up that I feel so bad about. I have transplanted as many as I can, but there are still many plants that will die.

If anyone is in the area (southwest NH), email me and you can come take as many as you can find. There are probably 50 plants that I spotted today.

A few years ago, I offered to mail them to people from here, but it cost me too much money and I just don't have the time right now, as I'm in the middle of lambing.

Here is a link that might be useful: Some might be painted trillium like this one!

Comments (12)

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    15 years ago

    Maybe the New England Wildflower Society would be interested in a rescue operation?

    Claire

  • LisaNH
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    Somebody from here came and got as many as her garden would hold today, but agreed with me that there are probably hundreds still left to rescue. There is also Solomon's Seal and Jacks in the Pulpit in the same area.

    Anyone else in the area?

    If someone going to the NH Plant Swap would like some, please let me know.

    Lisa

  • dawiff
    15 years ago

    Lisa,

    I just sent you an email, but the email feature of GW has been a bit flaky lately, so if you don't get it, please email me from my member page.

    Thanks,

    Alison

  • peoniesaremyfave
    15 years ago

    Lisa,

    I just sent you an email also. If you do not receive it please post to this and I contact you another way.

    Wendi :)

  • peoniesaremyfave
    15 years ago

    Hi Lisa!

    I am just bumping this message up in the thread, keeping my fingers crossed for myself (and Allison obviously because if it wasn't for her 'bump' I would have never seen your message).

    I already told my DH--don't make any plans for this weekend, I am waiting to hear back from someone on GW, we just be be taking a road trip. My DH's response "Oh boy, I have to bring shovels don't I?" He loved the picture that you linked to your post. It is now his desktop on his computer screen, he says it looks good on the LCD flat screen that he has on his desk.

    Wendi :)

    Wendi

  • LisaNH
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    I'm so glad you guys are interested. I've got three people coming on Saturday, and now have emails from three more. Let's see what the people on Saturday think of what is left. My guess is that there will still be plants, as we are sitting on a trillium-happy spot here, but I don't want people to make the drive unless there are still plants. I'll update after the weekend.

  • grancard
    15 years ago

    My father age 89 just passed away, we re going up to his funeral today. We may be close enough to you to dig some up, we would like to plant them at his gravesite. He has picked themn up in Maine every year since his first born and given them to my mother as a bouquet, started 69 years ago. Please let us know. We are in Lyndeborough,15 minutes from Peterborough, and would be willing to drive as soon as we hear back from you. You can also call 654-6472 or e-mail us your phone, we can call back.
    Sincerely,
    Sheila

  • dawiff
    15 years ago

    Just wanted to post a thank you to Lisa for letting us come and tramp all around digging up and looking for these wonderful wildflowers. There are plenty more, I think.

    Like Lisa said, bring big pots, and be prepared to dig deeply and carefully to make sure you get all the roots.

    If anyone else is interested in wildflowers besides the red and painted trilliums, I noticed there are also jack-in-the-pulpits, as well as two other woodland/deep shade wildflowers -- Clintonia borealis and Trientalis borealis. You can find information about both at the Connecticut Botanical Society website. I don't know how well those last two will do in home gardens, but they might be worth a try.

    Thanks again, Lisa. Oh, and we loved meeting your horses and sheep and pigs. And your cute little doggie!

    Alison

    Here is a link that might be useful: Connecticut Botanical Society

  • patrick_nh
    15 years ago

    I hate to be the one to rain on the parade, but has anyone checked on the legality of such an operation? Seems almost as though you can't set foot in the woods now-a-days without being governed by some regulation.

  • LisaNH
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    How could saving plants be illegal, though? We own the land, and are clearing it for pasture. If these plants aren't dug up and transplanted, they will die from sun exposure, if they aren't eaten by the sheep or chickens first.

    It's getting too late for them now, I think. They are getting very hard to spot now that the leaves are shriveling up, sadly. But I bet near a hundred plants were saved.

  • jim_g_ma
    15 years ago

    Private Landowners can dig up anything on their own property in NH.

    Here's a link to the NH Protected Plant Law

    There is a prohibition on exporting protected plants out of State in there worth noting, but I don't see Trillium on the NH Protected Plant List

  • LisaNH
    Original Author
    15 years ago

    Unless someone wants to come up in the next few days, I think this is it. There were a total of eight of you who came up, and you each took probably 30ish plants on average? They are all burning up from the sun now. There are still a few painted trillium in the driveway area, which is more shaded.

    I bet there will be another flush next spring, as my sheep won't get put in to these fields until the fall, so the plants won't get eaten. If I spot them next year, I'll post again here and we can do another rescue.

    Maybe the New England Wild Flower Society will have time to organize something for them as well, next year.

    You guys let me know if they come up for you next year, okay?

    Lisa