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runktrun

Photos Of Plants From Near And Far

runktrun
15 years ago

I know sharing trip photos with folks can be a bit presumptuous but I thought since 98% of my photos from a trip to New Zealand last spring were of plants that I would post a few each dayÂÂbe prepared I have hundreds. If there is a particular plant or region your curious about I will post those first. If you have any photos of a plant from your yard, community or a trip I think it would be great if you would share...plus I wouldn't feel like the lone plant geek.

When I first saw this Eucalyptus tenuiramis ÂSilver Peppermint in the Christchurch Botanical Garden I was so moved by itÂs beauty I actually ran up and hugged the old gal.



Her trunk gives you a clue to her age



Here she is with her arms reaching out victoriously



Easy to see why it is called ÂSilver PeppermintÂ

Comments (57)

  • Sue W (CT zone 6a)
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Very interesting photo collection and great idea for discussion. Kt, my husband spent a couple of weeks in New Zealand in 1988 on a ski vacation. Of course that was August. I started wondering where those pictures were and remembered I never really did anything with the few hundred I took on a trip to Rome and Florence two years ago. Since we're showing trees, here is a tree I captured in the Borghese Gardens.

    {{gwi:1094812}}

    A courtyard also in Borghese Gardens.

    {{gwi:1094813}}

    A garden amidst the ruins of Pompeii.

    {{gwi:1094814}}

    Some private terraces in view of the Spanish Steps.

    {{gwi:1094815}}

    I took alot of "garden" shots. If something had even a remote horticultural theme I jumped on it-fountains included. What fun!

    Sue

  • ego45
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Something from not so far, picture was taken in Wilton, CT this summer.
    Eremurus Himalaicus. (Lady in a picture about 5'1"-5'2" tall).
    {{gwi:1094816}}

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  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Sue I love how even amidst the ruins of Pompeii there is a garden. The olive trees are perfect sentinels in each corner. I would love to know more about the olive tree is it a tree or a bush? What was your over all impression of it?
    Ego Eremurus Himalaicus foxtail lily is now officially number one on my must have list do you know how late the corms can be planted and more importantly where could I buy them?? Eyes glazed over arms out stretched must have Eremurus, must have Eremus
    Back here at the Christchurch Botanical Garden I stumbled early on to one of my favorite trees from Chile, Araucaria imbricata the Monkey Puzzle tree. The British didnt settle Christchurch until 1850 and shortly there after they began to establish the botanical garden. I thought no surprise there the Englishmen probably put their flower gardens in long before they finished their roofs. The garden is in downtown surrounded by rivers and has a strong English influence, as does the entire city. Many of the trees in the garden are 120 plus years old.
    Tea House at entrance to the garden


    The Monkey Puzzle tree amongst good company

    I love the shiney needled branches

    Who doesnt love a monkey

  • ego45
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Katy, different species and cultivars of Eremurus available from VanEngelen (link is below).
    They are somewhat challenging to grow in NE due to the wet winters we have. Otherwise fully hardy and undemanding. Very sharp drainage a must, ideal placement would be in a top portion of a sharp slope. Full sun only. Staking is not required if protected from winds.

  • cloud_9
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    George - No need to worry about Katy and drainage. :-)

    Katy - For smaller quantities of the same bulbs try John Scheepers - which is the sister company to VanEngelen. (in Bantam, CT!)

    I'll go for a walk with you anytime and we can just grope as we go - saving the hugs for the truly magnificent. Then if we got lost it was because you let "the girl with NO sense of direction" blaze the trail!

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    kt- i vividly remeember the first time i saw a monkey puzzle tree.It was in 1978 on my solo cross-country camping trip(yep, me, my volvo, my little $25 army navy pup tent and 10,000 miles in sept and oct! best thing i ever did for myself). There were a pair of this tree in Aberdeen, Washington State in front of a historic house museum that had been mansion/home to a late 19th c.lumber baron who brought back the trees from a business trip to so. amer.
    wowee gee, was my mind blown!!

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ego, Order has been placed and I am now perched by the mailbox. Thanks for feeding my addiction I was beginning to go through plant shopping withdrawal, which seems to happen every year at this time.
    Cloud9, When the monkey loving arbo_retum shared with us that Dan Hinkley will be laid up for a while it dawned on me that someone needs to take over plant exploration and who better than us. Of course the first thing we would need to pack would be a compass for you. Thanks for being concerned about the possibility that I might need to buy large quantities of plants but it was like a drug rushing through my veins every time the message on my shopping basket told me I needed to buy more.
    Mindy, I am envisioning the Volvo packed so tightly with plants that there was just enough room for your tent, your toothbrush, and yourself. I am glad you are a fellow monkey lover. kt

    Private garden outside of Auckland, which is on the northern end of the north island. Hmm do I hear someone from the nutmeg state eating their words for breakfast?


    Even this public garden in Napier on the north island saw the importance of highlighting succulents in their bed design.

    Back in Christchurch this is Protea nitidia from South Africa.

    I loved the subtle variations of color and texture in the grouping of plants at the Christchurch Botanical Gardens.

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    kt-
    i want to learn more about this amazing- always wanted -to-go-country.do you know the range of zones of new zealand?is it the nirvana of the gardening world or does it have its own problems with snow, hale, heat, wind,rain, soil?(i.e. the gardeners you met- did they complain about certain climatic, soil or critter problems?) i wonder if drainage is good all over there because of it being historically volcanic. those succulents sure looked happy(but then, does EVERYTHING look happy there?)

    eager to learn!
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    New Zealand Native
    Pittosporum eugenioides 'Variegatum'
    Variegated Lemonwood. This is a highly adaptable plant family that comes in many forms from fast growing trees to dwarf shrub. It is capable of growing under many different soil conditions, its flowers are nicely scented, and is often used as hedges or windbreaks. Arbo_retum asked what zone is New Zealand and believe it or not the answer it even more varied than asking what zone is New England. In general Christchurch, which sits on the Pacific Ocean, is zone 9 but keep in mind there are also rivers surrounding the Botanical Garden. The USDA system of classification has assigned zones 8-11 throughout New Zealand but what I found in talking to gardeners is that differences in local microclimates made zone classifications much more of a general guide than they are here in New England. That said as I post photos I will attempt to include zone info. Also keep in mind that unlike here in the states zones 8-11 were COLD but do not reach the extreme of their zone classification. I will be talking about soil, pests, New Zealand natives, ect all of have extremes not typically found in the US which makes NZ such an interesting place.

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    thank you kt. you have my rapt attention!
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    The Eucalyptus delegatensis or its common name alpine ash (because the timber bears a slight resemblance to pale-colored European ash) is the tallest growing Eucalyptus in New Zealand. Alpine Ash is native to the mountains of Tasmania and the Australian Alps but this one is believed to have been planted in the Christchurch botanical Gardens in 1885. Although this tree is frost hardy and can tolerate temperatures of 7 to 10 degrees, is a hard wood that is easy to work and stain, it was never farmed for anything other than pulp because of its tendency to split. New Zealanders are very aware of their agricultural resources and dependency on the world market place. I cant tell you how many tons of Fuji apples from New Zealand I have eaten over the last five years and expected to see vast apple orchards. I was surprised to learn that with in the last year or two when the price of apples fell dramatically in the international market a majority of the orchards replaced their apples with grapes for wine.
    The lower trunk of this Eucalyptus delegatensis reminded me of an elegant womans ball gown.


    Where the tree begins to limb the bark of the Alpine Ash peels away.

    Two dancers with their arms out stretched.

    Graceful old gal.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Arboretum asked about pests and today hands down the possum is at the top of the list. New Zealand's indigenous fauna and flora evolved in isolation, making them vulnerable to introduced species as their defense mechanisms are often ineffective. The effects of introduced animal pests and plant weed species have been profound, threatening large numbers of indigenous species. Introduced animals such as possums, are eating indigenous vegetation, while weeds are replacing it. Possums were imported from Australia to stimulate a fur industry in 1858. There are thought to be about 70 million in NZ, while in parts of their native environment they are considered endangered. The possums have no mammal predators in New Zealand and unlike in Australia the native flora has little or no protection ie thorns, plant poisons, ect. The damage they do is primarily to foliage and can devastate vast areas. It is estimated some 21,000 tons of vegetation per day is consumed. They consume about 15% of the annual foliage production of New Zealand's 15 most common plants. Nearly each time I was in the presence of a New Zealander and visiting Australian there was the good natured suggestion that the Australian bring back home a possum with them. Of course NZ is home to another large introduced mammal population Merino sheep and no where in New Zealand from high end boutique to souvenir shop was there a piece of wool clothing that wasnt blended with possum fur! I must admit I was turned of at the thought but ohhhhh soft and warm. Deer (venison) is farmed in New Zealand and other than trouble from a few escapees they are not on top of the pest list. Second to the possum in the category of serious pest would be the rabbit that Captain Cook brought and introduced for fur and meat. It wasnt long as you can imagine before the rabbit population was out of control so the weasel and ferret were introduced to reduce the rabbit population which they have done a relatively good job at keeping under control but it is now realized that they are doing serious damage to native birds. And so it goeswith each species introduced from man we are eventually reminded that Mother Nature does know best.
    Display in souvenir shoppossum humor abounds in NZ


    Home made display of gestational cycle of a possumyikes!

    Although there is plenty of beef to be had in NZ venison seemed to be preferred.

    Sheep, sheep everywhere sheep.

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    kt,
    that photo of the car and the opossums is just hysterical. aside from native foliage, do the oppossum eat up perennial garden foliage too? if so, do they trap them? strange that our opossums seem to do no big deal damage that i have ever heard of...
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mindy the possum that is a pest in New Zealand is a distant relative to the opossums from the Americas. Possums and opossums are both nocturnal marsupials that are omnivores. There are sixty three different possum species and in Australia where the possums have predators (owls, dingos, ect) the population is under control and possums are regarded much like squirrels here in the states. In New Zealand where the possum has no predator they are doing major damage to vegetation and native New Zealand birds. They are a pest every where and although native species seem to be their favorite they will devastate a perennial bed over night. What they love the most is fresh young leafy growth and they will return to the same tree, shrub, plant, time after time until it is dead. They like to live in dry shelters like hollow trees, garden sheds, or yikes attics. There are many different methods of killing possums depending on where you live. 1080 is Sodium monofluoroacetate. It is an artificially-made substance used to kill possums but is like a naturally occurring poison found in some South African, South American and Australian trees. 1080 is the most commonly used method of possum control in New Zealand. kt

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Still in Christchurch Botanical Gardens zone nine a few weeks shy of winter season.
    Pinus maritima Cluster Pine from Southern Europe


    More great bark

    Colletia cruciata Anchor Plant was a very cool shrub from Chile and Argentina the blooms are sweetly scented.

    Can anyone tell what this tree is ? I would love to know.

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    kt- that bark is just phenominal- did you note what type of tree it's from? and i think the sweet smell of that anchor plant must be a 'venus fly trap' come-on to impale would-be
    anchor plant destroyers!yow! so sorry to hear of the destructive habits of their possums; what a drag. and unlike our deer troubles, you can't even fence for them.
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mindy,
    The photo of the bark is a close up of the Cluster Pine isn't it amazing? I don't have much time this am and my internet explorer seems to be acting up so I will be brief. I wanted to show you some photos of one of my favorite conifers still in Christchurch zone 9.
    Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Lawson Cypress...outside, inside, and seeds.



  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Sorry really late again today hope to make up for it over the rainy weekend.
    Larix great blue colored conifer


    Beautiful cones.
    .

    Sculpture in Cathedral Square down town Christchurch

    Very active square there always seemed to be a class of some type happening.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Well I was in a hurry this morning and did not first write the post in word so of course I lost my post. Here it is for a second time (a bit abbreviated).

    Leucadendron is an important shrub in the new Zealand garden as it is winter blooming. It is originally from South Africa and there are many different varieties and colors.

    Coprosma a native New Zealand shrub is again an important presence in the winter garden. There are at least two varieties that I noted (red & pink). This fall I bought Coprosma Rays Red from Avant Gardens that I am trying to winter over indoors. So far it seems to be settling in.

    This English variegated ilex was by far and beyond the nicest specimen I have ever seen.

    Ulmus globra camperdownii I love how this weeping tree twists and turns where the limbs begin (is that called the union?)

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thanks to some very brilliant tree and shrub people at a different site I now have an id on these wonderful textural shrubs. All three are winter blooming Leucadendron. I would love to have these blooming in my garden during the winter season. From left to right Leucadendron argenteum, Leucadendron laureolum, Leucospermum reflexum.


    Close up of Leucospermum reflexum

    This beauty has now been identified as Fagus sylvatica (European Beech)

    Close Up of Fagus sylvatica (European Beech) Its bark reminds me of seal skin.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Elegia caperisis Cape South Africa great grass

    Erica discolor love the flower I will have to look this one up.

    Fatsia japonica
    1009

    Dicksonia Antarctica - Tree Fern in front of fern house I will post MANY more tree ferns in their native forest as I traveled closer to Antarctica.

  • diggingthedirt
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Wow, Katy, these photos are great - especially the fantastic trees.

    I wonder if there are any Leucadendron that are hardy anywhere colder than the Pacific northwest. I'd love to try one, anything that blooms in winter is worth a shot.

    I just returned from a trip that included a few days in Chile and a few in Panama. My camera, unfortunately, stayed behind.

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    love the seed heads on the fatsia.like starbursts!
    loving this education, kt! thank you
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Zelkova carpinifolia? Reminds me of a sea serpent.


    Cedrus libani (Lebanon Cedar) what a great old grand tree

    Cedrus libani var. atlatica (Atlas Cedar)
    1098

    Araucaria bidwillii (bunya) another great textural plant that NZ gardeners seem to take for granted. I think gardeners who live in areas that have year round blossom have a more difficult time appreciating the value of texture.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    The few local gardeners that I spoke to in Christchurch shared with me a number of interesting things but the few things that stood out in my memory were that one weather/gardening challenges they face are norwesters which were described as a hot wind that can reach storm force levels and cause a lot of damage in the garden as well as to their homes. In the winter it is common for this zone 9 area to have temps that drop below 32 degrees at night and it will snow once or twice a year in the hills and once or twice every couple of years in the Canterbury plains. Most homes have by American standards small yards but everyone seems to be passionate about gardening particularly with NZ natives. I heard the same thing throughout NZ that in the land areas with volcanic soil you dont want to ever garden without a good pair of gloves as the volcanic soil will leave your skin cracked and bleeding.
    With a population of 350,000 the city of Christchurch is the largest city on the south island and the third largest in all of NZ. It was first settled by the English in 1850 when they sent over four ships carrying 800 people and unlike Australian pioneers most New Zealanders would like you to know these new settlers were not criminals. The city it self like many NZ communities is land locked and sandwiched between the banks peninsula that stretches into the Pacific Ocean to the east and the port hills (which are the remnants of two small conjoined volcanoes) to the south and a glacial fed river (forgot the name ) to the north. I have included below some parts of a travel journal (good reading to go to sleep by) that were my first impressions for family and friends.
    I then hopped a tram to Lyttleton a town on the other side of the surrounding mountains that is and was the last port before the artic. Although this small town of three thousand is only a 15 minute drive from the "big city" it had been cut off until they cut a tunnel through the port hills in 1965. When I first arrived to town I was getting my camera out of my pack ect and a nice older man started to talk well you know I not much for talkingso he gave me a tour of his village which included introducing me to everyone on the street and in any shop we entered. He was very old and walked very slowly but it was very cool to immediately become a part of this village. We stopped at a local café and had a glass of wine and spoke with three other women my age. The conversation was lively and interesting. I am leaving Christchurch tomorrow and traveling south along the east coast through the Canterbury plains to Dunedin where there are penguins and royal albatross. Miss you all Love kt

    This photo was taken standing on top of the port hills (which are the remnants of two small conjoined volcanoes) looking to the south down into the small village of Lyttleton and Diamond harbor with the Banks peninsula and Pacific ocean in the distance.

    Main Street down town Lyttleton note that housing in town is built on volcanic slope and lot sizes are considerably small.

    Cool theater buiding in Lyttleton I love old library and theater buildings

    These homes are typical in style and size for non city homes throughout New Zealand


    Getting close to Utopia
    Today is gray, cold, and wet, but I left Christchurch and headed south into the Canterbury plains after one hour traveling on the main highway (two lane road) we entered the Ashburton District we drove for another half hour through farm country. Nothing but flat land broken up buy rows of confers planted as wind breaks the mile after mile of fields enclosed by green walls is very different. Some of the land is for sheep but quite a bit looked as though it is farmed. Every once in a while there will be a break in the developed land and there will be a stretch of bush which is low scrub of scotch broom that is in bloom now and grasses. Ashburton has a population of 14,500 and the down town about the size of Plymouth was thriving with shops and restaurants catering to the locals rather than tourists. The only tourist draw to this area is hot air ballooning and a small race track (horses I think). The homes that are not on a farm were cute small and again little or no yard in the downtown area. Ashburton is the big city for the Plains District and of course has an Agricultural feel but they do have an art museum and golf club. Of course there are sheep everywhere but there are also llama farms as well as deer (venison is often on the menu of all types of restaurants. It is a bit odd to see a herd of deer fenced in on a farm. Everywhere I go there are travel agencies on every corner as new Zealanders are big travelers I dont think I have spoken to a single person who has not traveled to the states. There is a big Japanese population as Japan is relatively close by. While on a public bus an older man started singing a sea chantey about the northern lights of course everyone showed their appreciation with applause so he continued to serenade us for the rest of the ride. I couldnt believe how many songs this elderly man knew I can barely remember the lyrics of a few Christmas carols. Stopped in Oamaru for lunch it was a nice seaside town with white stone buildings where I went into a tea room and had a mutton and pickle sandwich. Oamaru is the end of the plains and suddenly I entered rolling hill country with the southern alps to the west and an untouched shoreline to the east. The rolling hillside is primarily grassland with conifers spotted here and there and of course sheep. Everywhere you look in the south there is beauty far greater than I expected. Although it is a gray wet day in the fall (apples are still hanging on the trees) when we drove through the small town of Palmerston I easily could see creating a life here. There were a couple of homes for sale as well hmmmI wish you were here Joe I think I have stumbled on our dream. Well this is just the beginning of the journey but I see little reason to continue on other than the need to eventually catch a plane back home to you. xoxoxkt

  • arbo_retum
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    that photo from above lyttleton is just breathtaking.and all your info; i'm getting a wonderful education here! thanks again
    mindy

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Cordyline australis is a tree that grows 20-30 and is one of the hardiest of fifteen species (yucca - Joshua trees out west) five of which are native to New Zealand. The early Maori used the leaves of the cabbage trees to weave into clothing and rope and it was part of their diet. Archeologists discovered cabbage tree ovens on the Otago peninsula (where we are now) which were a bed of hot rocks in a pit with food placed on top then a wet clotherocks on topsounds like a clam bake! Being an admitted plant snob (now come on you know you are too) I must admit I barely paid any attention to the cabbage tree until I saw it in a more formal garden design. Tell me what you think.
    Otago peninsula


    Formal Garden on the Otago penninsula

    Same view just a little closer and now it includes the native cabbage trees. I think the addition is outstanding.

    Maori Meeting House down the road on Otago peninsula with native plantings including a cabbage tree.

  • gardenbug
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    My world view is expanding thanks to you. Up 'til now, clematis was mostly my NZ connection, in particular, one called Aotearoa. (land of the long white cloud.)

  • gardenbug
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    My world view is expanding thanks to you. Up 'til now, clematis was mostly my NZ connection, in particular, one called Aotearoa. (land of the long white cloud.)

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Dtd, I know you didn't have your camera with you in Chile and Panama but I wonder if you would be willing to share flora and fauna impressions ect. when you have a chance.

    Mindy thanks for the kind words and enthusiasm.

    Bug do you collect clematis?? Princess Di was still blooming until first hard frost 11/3.

    Taiaroa Head - Otago Penninsula Dunedin. This is an amazing area as it is home to Royal Albatross, Yellow Eyed Penguins, Blue Penguins, fur seals, sea lions, to name a few.

    Wheres Waldo!! There are at least eight fur seals in this photo see if you can find them.

    To see the extremely endangered yellow eyed penguins you are brought to a shelter on the beach at a great distance to view with binoculars and are kept hidden from the penguins. They nest on the bank.

    Looking down on the city of Dunedin and across at the beginning of the Otago Penninsula

    March of the Penguins
    Well every mile forward into my adventure becomes more amazing after a six hour drive to Dunedin I arrived into a city of 120,000 it sits on the Pacific Ocean at the bottom of some steep rolling hills. Dunedin is a University town and was originally founded in 1860 during New Zealands gold rush era. This is such a beautiful place in some ways it reminds me of San Diego. I made my way out of the city and on the Otago peninsula I found a place called Natures Wonders that is a privately owned stretch of land and beach dedicated to protecting the endangered yellow eyed penguin. The endangered yellow eyed penguin (there are only eight hundred of them left in the world) is the only penguin that can not survive in captivity it becomes so terrified it dies within two hours of coming in contact with humans. Unlike other types of penguins the yellow eyed is very solitary they mate for life but do not like to be too near other yellow eyed penguins. When I arrived to Natures Wonders they handed me a rain slicker and directed me to a mud covered otv vehicleoff we went into the sheep covered hills and down the cliffs to the shore to watch the penguins from afar. They nest in the foothills and take turns waddling across the beach and into the ocean to feed. When they are done feeding their mate is so excited to see them return they leave the nest and waddle to the shoreline to greet them. They were soooooooo cute. Off of the same beach two days earlier three killer whales had been spotted. This is also the nesting place of the royal albatross which is a huge bird with a wing span of 4-6 feet. Again I am finding the people to be very generous of spirit and again I am in another city that has zero litter isnt that amazing? The University is the most prestigious in New Zealand and is Dunedins largest employer followed by Cadbury Chocolate and then an appliance manufacturer. Joe perhaps this place is not only calling to me because of its in creditable natural beauty but the possibility of working at a chocolate factory as a taster of course. On the surface I think we would be very happy living anywhere between Oamaru and Dunedin but who knows what tomorrow will bring? Love kt

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Fuchsia is a genus of flowering plants, mostly shrubs, and is a member of the Onagraceae (evening primrose family), but one New Zealand species Fuchsia excorticata is unusual in the genus in being a tree. The most common cultivars are hybrids, of which there are thousands, propagated by cuttings, since seeds will not breed true. My photo is of a hybrid in a residential garden in Dunedin. There are about 125 wild species of fuchsia. They are only to be found in Latin America (+120 species), in New Zealand (4 species) and Tahiti (1 species).
    The New Zealand species and Fuchsia magellanica from the mountains of Magellan in Chile, are very winter hardy. F. procumbens (New Zealand) is also winter hardy it is a creeping fuchsia that lies flat on the ground and produces erect, small bright yellow / brown / green flowers with red anthers and bright blue pollen. The stems are very thin and foliage is rounded. It is native to sand banks on the Northern Island of New Zealand.
    Fuchsia excorticata is a deciduous tree fuchsia which grows on edge of forests in New Zealand , particularly the North Island, up to 3000 feet and forms a tree of some 40 to 50 feet in height, in favorable conditions forming a trunk 3 feet in diameter.
    It is one of the most common trees of the New Zealand forests but is one of many native trees that possums are devouring. It has a short gnarled trunk and the cinnamon colored bark hangs in long strips. Fuchsia excorticata will grow so large that it is often used as a cover for Rhododendrons.


    Train Station in Dunedin

    I took this photo because I thought it was a good example of a possible solution to the problem of gravel drive meets lawn. What do you think?

    Downtown Dunedin- note that the covered walk ways offer shelter from sun, rain, snow. In each NZ city I visited there were similar shelters on each corner where pedestrians would wait to cross the street. The shop awnings throughout the cities over hang to the curb it was wonderful I wish New England Cities would offer the same.

  • ego45
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Re: Fuchsia magellanica and F. procumbens.

    Those of us who live in a warmer end of z6 definitely could try to grow F.magellanica, which is reputedly hardy to -5/-10F (z7). Of course, if you'll be able to find it, since I never seen it for sale here. I got mine from GWer from PNW, but ForestFarm have several cultivars available.
    It will behave as a dieback perennial, pretty much as a caryopteris, and if dies completely to the ground will resprout from the roots very late, say mid/late May. In such case it will be about 2x2' by July and will bloom from early August till frost. Shrub is heat and drought sensitive and absolutely resist transplanting (that is how I killed mine) unless in a very early spring while dormant.
    They are mostly red/scarlet, but there is a lavender cultivar 'Mollinae'(sp?) and a pink one 'Sharpitor'.
    I'll be looking to buy some of those next spring to plant among azaleas/rhododendrons for the summer color and possibly to grow in container.

    F.procumbens is a very 'strange' plant, IMO.
    When not in bloom you'll miss it completely.
    When in an early stage of bloom you have to be pointed to it, otherwise you'll miss it as well.
    The most interesting part is at the late stage of the bloom, when some flowers are still present, but seedpods already formed and start turning into plum color.
    I don't grow it, but saw fairly old speciman grown in a huge urn in private garden in Florence, Italy.

    BTW, the world largest assembled collection of fuschias is in....Sweden.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ego,
    Thanks for the really great info but a I have to tell you a day later I am still laughing, yesterday afternoon I had just come inside from planting my Eremurus Himalaicus to read not only your suggestion of possible zone pushing (heart started beating faster and palms became swetty) but a link to Forest Farm which is nothing more than a distributor of the drugs that feed my addiction. I have put Fuchsia magellanica 'Maiden's Blush' on the top of my spring shopping list. It was good to know about f. magellanica not happy about being moved. I really would love it if someone would start a thread re transplanting successes and failureshint, hint.

    Entrance to the Dunedin Botanical Garden that is located in the heart of the city Zone 8.


    Great combo of Cordyline and Dahlia in front of Rhododendron. Although considered to be in the same USDA zone Dunedin is closer to Antarctica than Christchurch and its climate closer mimics that of the Himalayans. The botanical garden is most revered for its Rhododendron dell.

    Every turn more beautiful than the last

    This shrub was not labeled but I am pretty certain it is a Barberry.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Dunedin Botanical Garden I am not a big fan of grassesyes I can hear you gasp but I do like how they can really soften corners and almost create more of a mystery of what is around the bend. What do you think?


    This peaceful vista is one that I think arbo_retum is going to love.

    I like the added dimension that terracing gives to this herb garden

    Terraced alpine garden isnt it one of the most beautiful you have ever seen?

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Dunedin Botanical Gardens


    Magnificent Moss

    Great knots

    A rose is a rose is a rose

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Yes bug eaten at the end of the season but I love the leaf combo.


    Rhodies look good as a backdrop or foreground to everything.

    One of my all time hands down favorites.

    The scale here is wonderful.

  • narcnh
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Arrggghhhhh!!!!! Too beautiful!!!! Cannot take it anymore!!! Must give up current life and move to the Land of the Hobbits!!!!!

    narcnh of Rohan

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Although not a New Zealand native there are many different varieties through out NZ gardensnot a stretch to see why I just love the shrub regardless of the flower. I came across the following info re the genus of Protea that I thought was interesting.
    "Africa shares only one genus with Madagascar, whereas South America and Australia share many common genera this indicates they separated from Africa before they separated from each other."

    Protea scolymocephala


    Protea aristata

    Protea

    Cedrus deodara Mountain Beauty in center

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Colorful conifers


    Arbutus unedo Strawberry Tree

    One of the main differences between Christchurch and Dunedin Botanical gardens is the age of the specimens Christchurch (and it is a concern for them) has a large population of older trees.

    Path up the hillside toward the Rhodendron DellNo photos of Dell they were all lost as were a third of my over all photos when my lap top crashed and fried. Yes I know back up back up back up.

    Hey this is Palmerston a small village population 890 which is typical of the FEW small villages outside of the cities. The south island is made up of vast stretches (hour after hour, mile after mile) of sheep/venison farms. This photo really represents what the Otago region is all about it reminds me of Nova Scotia you can double click on the photo and work with the button for a close up view. It is about an hour north of Dunedin the area's big city.
    I spent the morning and part of the afternoon touring around Dunedin trying to learn about the different areas, while getting a cup of tea I chatted with some locals all of whom are very proud of their city. A few things that I found out were New Zealand is called the country of the white cloud..in reference to the number of cloudy days. It does snow this far south but just like at home it is infrequent and usually melts before it hits the ground. In the 90s New Zealand went through a slight recession and Dunedin was the only city that did not have a hard time because the University is the large employer and like plumbing there is always a need for Universities. Real estate prices are considerably higher than I thought they would be but I am yet to be discouraged. The city itself is very cool the botanical gardens were amazing they have a similar climate to the Himalayans where rhododendrons are native so the Botanical Garden has four thousand different rhodies from around the world all planted in a dell. In November when they are in bloom people come from all over the world some of the rhodies are even scented. Yes I know Morgan your making your trip plans now. Everything in New Zealand is backwards the sun sets in the east the south side of a house is the shady side, and they drive on the wrong side of the road. I traveled today to the southern alps to a town called Te Anau the alps look just like the Alps in Austria. All during the 4.5 hour trip all I saw was sheep and grass covered rolling hills there were two small villages along the way that were unremarkable. I arrived in the evening so I dont have much to report other than my feeling that this area may be too remote for everyday living but the Otago region outside of Dunedin may be what we are looking for let me know what you think. I am going to Queenstown soon and have high hopes for that area.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Entering Fiordland aka "The Wet West" where rainfall is measured in feet not inches.

    Lake Manipouri with the Southern Alps in the back ground. The land sandwich between the Alps and the Tasman Sea is not only beautiful but botanically very unique.


    Crossing Wilmot Pass on the Way to Doubtful Sound. Wilmot Pass has some of the most amazing moss. This photo has Silver Beech Trees in the fore ground (more on my love affair with the Beech later) and the Southern Alps in the background.

    Looking down into Pearl Harbor Doubtful Sound which is actually not a Sound but a Fiord. "A fiord is a glaciated valley - typically narrow and steep-sided - that has been flooded by the sea after the glaciers retreat. A sound, on the other hand, is a river valley flooded by the sea following a rise in sea levels or depression of the land, or a combination of both."

    Water falls from mountain streams that are always high with rain water and pour down the mountain sides everywhere.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I would like to announce my nomination of the Silver Beech tree as the premier survivor under adversity. We all have on our most revered lists the pre Madonnas that when given the exact measure of all of its desired elements will grow into a specimen usually just a limb shy of our dreams. All too often in the plant world the rugged survivor under the right conditions can be given the ugly title of being a thug, a pest, or invasive. As if these prejudices werent enough it is the rugged survivor that also faces the condescending sneers from those who judge a plant based solely on beauty. I will be rambling on for days attempting to not only state by case for the beech tree but in the process discuss the three different types of native forest in New Zealand and primarily the lowland native forest of Fiordland, the weather, geology, other plant types, and anything else you might be interested in. PLEASE throw me a bone and let me know if there is anything your interested in. kt
    Navigating through one of three fingers that make up the Doubtful Sound (fiord) towards the opening to the Tasman Sea. It is the rare day that it is not raining in Fiordland as moist westerly airstreams blow across the Tasman and crash into the high land mass of the southern alps and drop buckets of never ending rain before continuing east across dry regions of New Zealand. My camera is grateful for the chance to dry off and the only bit of travel advice I would have to offer you is dont go to NZ without a WATER PROOF CAMERA.

    Silver Beech lowland native forest at altitude where forest ends and alpine forest takes over (brown colored area). The trees and other plants that grow in alpine forests are adapted to survive the cold. Trees growing in alpine areas will not often grow as tall as the same species would grow in a lowland forest because of the colder climate and wind. The alpine forest areas have diverse plants that I will share with you later.

    Tree avalanches are a common occurrence with little other than a few cracks in the steep granite for the roots of a mature tree to hold it in place often a rain or snow storm will blow over a tree and then like a domino effect everything below the fallen tree goes too.

    Almost immediately moss, lichens, and hardier shrubs start growing and lay the foundation for the forests regeneration by acting as a propagating bed for larger forest trees.

  • gardenscout
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This thread has been a treasure for me. Thank you for your generosity with your pictures and your time.

  • ego45
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Kt,
    some more, please.

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Kt:

    More photos would be great, but please, for the sake of those of us with dialup, start a new thread.

    I love looking at your magnificent photos, but on a long thread like this I can't see the new posts until most of the earlier ones are loaded. And that takes a long, long time.

    Thanks,
    Claire

  • diggingthedirt
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Phenomenal photos, Katy! Really, really stunning. Gotta go check my frequent flyer miles and see what I can do...

  • ego45
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    First and foremost I would like to resurrect this great thread I bookmarked as 'My favorites' and perusing from time to time when in a right mood,
    and second, would like to provide link to some great pictures from the less known European gardens.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ego,
    Thanks for reminding me I transferred a number of photo's and journal entries to a blog as this thread was slow to load. I still have many, many, many, more photo's to add from a second trip back to NZ including some podocarps showing great fall color, amazing moss photo's, private gardens, ect. and suppose now is as good of time as ever. I have had some folks unable to open the blog would you do me a favor and try the link below to see if I have resolved that problem.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ego,
    Your photo's are outstanding and have sealed the deal for me that next spring I have to do an English garden trip. The links on the left side of the page are interesting as well, can you translate for us?

  • ego45
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Kt,
    Yes, I was able to open your NZ blog.
    Simply breathtaking!!!
    and
    No, I can't translate, it is written in Sweden I guess :-(
    ...but....'picture is better than a thousand words' and in many cases they are selfexplanatory, doesn't?

    One more time thank you for sharing with us such a wonderful world of NZ.

  • runktrun
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ego,
    I have pages and pages of journal writing to ad as well as some pretty exciting photo's I will try to do this a little bit each day and post here when I have added to the blog. I am thrilled that you are enjoying the photo's as most of my non gardening friends and family were overwhelmed. Our plan for this winter is to spend some time in South Africa so I need to work on completing the NZ blog before I come back with more plant photos to share. kt