edie_nicosia1

towel warmer. waster of space or must have?

Edie Nicosia
5 years ago

thinking about buying the Costco anaconda comfort towel warmer. I am not sure where I will put it maybe over bathtub but I love a nice warm towel. Do you guys love yous or was it a waste of money or space?

Comments (40)

  • Errant_gw
    5 years ago

    From the manual:


  • seakuv
    5 years ago

    I put in a similar towel warmer about 5 years ago. I like the towel warmer, but the two things I'll do differently next time are: make sure the towel warmer has a programmable timer and ensure that the warmer has enough BTU's to get the towels very warm, rather than just slightly. From what I've observed, I'd want nearly a solid heating plane (not 4 or 5 bars spread 6-8" apart) and a pretty hefty wattage draw.

  • Edie Nicosia
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    There goes that plan, lol. anyone ignore this warning? I eally want a towel warmer. the only other place it could fit is maybe the separate toilet room.

  • seakuv
    5 years ago

    Hmmm...I missed the part about you wanting to put the electric towel warmer over the tub. I'd recommend checking your local electrical code. I can guarantee that it would prohibit such an installation - NEC 406.8(C) Bathtub and Shower Space. Receptacles shall not be installed within or directly over a bathtub or shower stall... As much of a nuisance as the codes can be sometimes, the truth is that they were often developed as a result of learning based on the misfortunes of others. Electricity and water aren't a good combo.

  • PRO
    By Any Design Ltd.
    5 years ago

    The towel warmer debate is a huge one. I have struggled over the years to find the best towel warmer and after a long search and dozens of installs I settled on a New Zealand product that was awesome.


    Most towel warmers look cheap.

    Most towel warmers have an exposed plug.

    Most have a silly light.


    Those you can live with. But most as well have warnings about placing wet towels on them. This is what I think is crazy. If you can place a wet towel on a towel warmer - I think you have a problem.


    Last week I needed to fix the mistakes (again) of the builder and electrical. I installed the largest towel warmer I have ever seen on a tile wall. Should be hooked up next week.


    My recommendation for towel warmers is the brand called Heirloom - but I think they are no longer available in Vancouver.



    Three of a kind · More Info


    What I like about these warmers is the lack of switches, plugs and lights. The power for this unit runs through the lower right stand off and to a wall switch about five feet away.



    Traditional Bathroom · More Info


    This bathroom got two of them. They also help take the chill of the cold exterior wall in the winter months.



    Three of a kind · More Info


    This warmer the clients used mostly for drying their wet jackets after an rainy walk. The dry off platform looks flat but I built it so it drains to the shower just to the right of the platform.


    This was the favourite warmer of the clients and soon their jackets lived here. Placing a warm jacket on - on a cold day is as nice as grabbing a warm towel after a long shower.


    All the warmers above are the Heirloom Product.


    Good Luck.



  • PRO
    By Any Design Ltd.
    5 years ago

    Here is a link to an Ideabook of mine that I started, but never finished. It has a couple other of good looking towel warmer photos and a couple of unique placements.


    How to choose which brand of towel warmer?

  • jewelisfabulous
    5 years ago

    I was bound and determined to have a wall mounted (hard wired) towel warmer installed during my master bath remodel until I realized that there was zero wall space near the shower to mount it. I could easily mount it on a wall near the tub, but since we use the tub rarely and the shower daily, it made no sense to spend the money for one afterall. Maybe I'll have one in my next house!

  • PRO
    By Any Design Ltd.
    5 years ago

    Space is the real killer on most jobs for sure.


    This shower I'm working on is in a bathroom larger than my bedroom. I have been here for months building this project.


    The towel warmer is Italian. First time I have installed one. Would have been nice to have solid blocking behind the stand offs. This unit was a bear to install and weighs a lot.


    Can not wait to take off the white strips and expose all the stainless steel.


    The steam shower entry will be right to the left.


    I have not grouted yet nor connected the towel warmer in this photo. The first towel warmer selected for this job was a little smaller and mounted onto a single junction box. When I unboxed this beauty it needed it's own larger rough in box installed. Had to cut this in place with my grinder and a few drill coring bits.


    The tile is a 1'x2' Porcelain tile. A Calcutta Gold look alike. Set with Laticrete 254 and will be grouted with Laticrete permacolour white grout.

  • tibbrix
    5 years ago

    IMO, waste of space AND energy and rise in electric bill.

  • nosoccermom
    5 years ago

    Well, some reviewers state that they don't need to wash their towels as offten because they dry on the towel warmer rather than acquire a musty smell.....


  • plan2remodel
    5 years ago

    The towel warmer will need a dedicated line. It was on my wish list until I realized I had no place to put one. Instead, I decided to splurge on heated flooring, which also needs a dedicated line. Bathroom is in middle of renovation.

  • Edie Nicosia
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    I really wanted one but unless i put it in the toliet room its not happening .

  • enduring
    5 years ago

    Swguru, you can lay your towel on the floor to get it warm ;) I love my heated floor.


  • Nancy in Mich
    5 years ago

    If you don't want to carpet your floor with your towel, try buying a warming drawer, instead! http://www.dacor.com/Our-Products/Warming-Drawers/Renaissance-24-Inch-Indoor-Outdoor-Warming-Drawer.aspx


  • Edie Nicosia
    5 years ago

    no idea but I thinking warm blankets might be nice too. I wonder if it can be done. As for me. I might have to lay my towel across my heated bathroom floors as I have no room for a towel warmer :(

  • jewelisfabulous
    5 years ago

    If you can't just run her shirts through the dryer for a few minutes in the morning, consider a floor model warmer that plugs into an outlet. And, what's your plan to improve your home's energy efficiency so it's not so cold inside in the winter?

  • Bunny
    5 years ago

    I didn't read all the comments, so apologies if this was already covered. I would not want anything wired that I could touch within a wet zone. No amount of reassurances could make me comfortable with that.

    Also, towels in the shower? With steam and water blasting? I don't get that at all.

  • jewelisfabulous
    5 years ago

    I think those showers must be really large so that the towels are out of the direct line of spray.

  • daisychain01
    5 years ago

    Jewel, we are reconstructing the whole house after a fire and have a massive plan for upgrading energy efficiencies - everything from Windows to insulating the tricky thing with an old house is that they are built to breathe so if you tighten them up without compensating you get bad problems Lots to think about

    We r hopeful it will be warmer but tend to keep the thermostat very low esp at night

    Our dryer is in the basement and I'm not the sort of mom to run down and warm up her clothes on a daily basis ( but I have been known to do it on special occasions)

  • Fori
    5 years ago

    She could iron her short every morning. Yeah, that'll happen!


  • greasetrap
    5 years ago

    I've stayed in a lot of British hotels with towel warmers, and I've never really understood the point of having them. I don't think they warm the towel up very well - just the small part that is in contact with the bars. The towels also seem to cool off quickly. They can be nice in the winter if the heat in the bathroom isn't very good, as it also acts like a radiator. I think a hot towel fresh from the dryer is much nicer - but that obviously won't work unless you have a dryer in your bathroom.

  • shappy22
    5 years ago

    I put an ordinary towel rack above my forced air heater vent, that's my towel warmer:) In California I think you would be crazy to install, with tiered electric bill anything that draws current like that would cost a ridiculous amount to operate--and it's not cold enough anyway. Another way to heat towels is to have someone put one in the dryer for a few minutes and walk it over to you.

  • Nancy in Mich
    5 years ago

    If you daughter is old enough to handle an electric blanket or electric mattress pad on her bed, she can tuck her uniform between the sheet and the blanket to get it toasty for the morning. It is much cheaper to heat a blanket than a room. :-)


  • Bunny
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Shappy, my towel racks are also over my floor registers. It not only warms them up, they dry really well and never ever get a bad smell.

  • MongoCT
    5 years ago

    All I can really offer on towel warmers is an opinion.

    I did a search for the Anacona and the hit I got showed that it's a 115W unit. There might be other models, but the watts-to-BTUs are scalable. 115W is a bit under 400BTUH of heating. With the bar ladder assembly, the ability of it to drying and warm your towels? It may, it may not.

    If someone wants a no-kidding towel warmer, I usually refer them to Runtal's series of warmers.

    If someone wants something to not just dry and heat towels, but to also possibly act as a room warmer? ie, a wall hung radiant panel that can no kidding warm a bathroom space? Or dry wet clothes? Then I refer them to the Runtal Omnipanel.

    The Omnipanel comes in different sizes, but the electric versions have outputs that vary from 250 to 700 watts. That equates to about 700 to 2400 BTUH. Due to the high energy consumption, I always recommend these units go on a timer. But because of their consumption, they work.

    The 2400 BTUH unit, for example. A generic heating requirement is about 30BTU/sqft/h of floor space. So that 2400BTUH unit could theoretically heat an 80sqft bathroom. It'll certainly warm a shower. And it'll most definitely warm your towels. It's a "flat slat" style of warmer, so more metal is in contact with the towel than you'd get with a tube-type of warmer.

    They also have hydronic units.

    Again, a personal opinion and a recommendation. They are pricey. But they do work. Different strokes...


  • Edie Nicosia
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    How about he s ted shelf towel warmer . maybe i can put it over the toliet

  • dancingcook
    5 years ago

    I thought long and hard about putting in a towel warmer. Contractor quoted $$$$ to install. Then I noticed that my towels are always warm in winter when the heat is on. And realized that's because I have a skinny radiator behind the bathroom door, and the towels hang on rails on the door, so effectively hang over the heater! Works like a charm, and doesn't cost anything extra. So I'm keeping my skinny radiator in my being-renovated bathroom.

  • DYH
    5 years ago

    I travel to Paris each year to visit friends and my apartment landlord from whom I rent has towel warmers installed, so I have experienced the pros and cons over the years:


    1. If you heat your towel, but then have to move it from the warmer in order to reach it from the shower, it will have cooled down by the time you need it. On the other hand, I wouldn't want it too close to the wet area.

    2. It dries out the towel nicely after each use.

    3. It's great for drying socks and other clothes than won't melt. Since I wash my clothes in the Paris apartment washing machine, I hang them to dry and put my heaviest cottons, such as socks and jeans on the towel warmer to dry. Off topic note: the combo washer/dryers in Europe do a super job of washing (on rapid cycle), but take FOREVER to dry.


    Back at home, I have heated bathroom floors and no towel warmer. In renovating my new old house, I'm going to stay with heated floors and no towel warmer. Another off-topic note: I love my warming drawer in the kitchen, but have never used it for towels.


  • mrsshayne
    5 years ago

    Edie Nicosia - I was just thinking about your remodel. Has it started yet? I know you bought stuff already. Did you ever buy the tile? I can't wait to see it finished. From what I saw, everything looked very nice and high end.

  • Edie Nicosia
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    HI ms shanyne. lol we keep changing our mind about the tile. My hubby is the one with the ideas. I hope it will look okay but I am a little nervous it might look too dark http://www.ylighting.com/bocci-series-14-1-mini-pendant-light.html

    http://rbctile.com/series/life/

    [http://www.floridatile.com/products/time2_0(http://www.floridatile.com/products/time2_0)

    the vanity will be in the walnut below by this company

    [https://www.houzz.com/photos/contemporary-bathroom-contemporary-bathroom-seattle-phvw-vp~1131578[(https://www.houzz.com/photos/contemporary-bathroom-contemporary-bathroom-seattle-phvw-vp~1131578)

    the floor tile will be the florida snow tile and that will be on two side walls of the shower. The middle of the shower will be the walnut tile as will the side of the Jacuzzi/ we have not picked anything for the the sides over the vanity and around the mirror. in the separate toilet rom the back wall will be the walnut tile going straight up. the floor will be the florida snow and the walls will be a light color of some sort.

    over the vanity we will have 3 robern 36 x 24 mirrors for a total of 72 x 36 inches. I might put those bocci pendants on the sides of the mirror or over the tub r both . not sure.

    the pebbles will go on the shower floor

    http://www.cooltiles.com/stafp108.html

  • Edie Nicosia
    5 years ago

    we had a lot of problems picking a faucet but are going with the moen 90 degree

    http://www.plumbersurplus.com/Prod/Moen-S6705BN-90-Degree-Single-Handle-Bathroom-Faucet-with-Trough-Spout-Brushed-Nickel/286977/Cat/1132

    http://www.plumbersurplus.com/Prod/Moen-S6705BN-90-Degree-Single-Handle-Bathroom-Faucet-with-Trough-Spout-Brushed-Nickel/286977/Cat/1132


    http://www.qualitybath.com/mti-boutique-collection-petra-solid-surface-vesselsemi-recessed-lavatory-sink-product-81408.htm?

    the sinks will be these.


    and the top will be a light quartz whatever home depot carries as we have a credit there. probably the white zeus.


    hopefully it all looks okay. I wanted a towel warmer but only space for it would be a towel shelf over the toilet and that like 10 steps from the shower and just might be weird. So I am giving that up. My goal now is to find the best blow dryer storage. I also hope that I did not mess up by getting 2 inch recessed lighting.

  • mrsshayne
    5 years ago

    Edie Nicosia - WOW I LOVE LOVE LOVE all your choices. You're going to need a professional photographer when you're done. With the finishes you picked, you'll have a true "Houzz" bathroom - :)

    I couldn't load all the tile choices but I really like the wood tile and vanity. I also love the idea of three mirrors used in your space. I think it will look ultra sleek with that lighting and the bathroom sink/faucets you picked out.

    The shower floor tile looks like it will go well too.

    My advice, try not to stress too much. When stuff was going in my bathroom I questioned every decision I made but once it was pretty much done - it was like it all magically came together and looked good. As far as the lighting - I wouldn't worry, as long as you're getting light, who cares what size it is, right? hehehehe..

    I had a cheap towel warmer in my old bathroom. It looked like a space ship/oven that you placed your towel in. The towel literally only stayed warm for about 30 seconds. I couldn't care less if I had a warmer in the new bathroom so I think you'll be fine. Plus, you're doing heated floors, right? That's one thing I wish I had. Man, is that tile COLD.....

    Keep us posted :)

  • amemm
    5 years ago
    We have had a warmrails towel shelf in (what used to be our only) full bath since 2004. It is a plug in, and is not on a timer. It does get 2-3 towels warm, and it is nice to have a warm towel when you step out of the tub. The 2 main benefits (already mentioned) are the following:
    1- your towels dry quickly and no dampness or musty smells

    2- you can dry delicates, or anything that you don't want to put in the dryer.

    We've held off on doing it in the new bath as we don't really have the wall space. We will see how things go.
  • PRO
    By Any Design Ltd.
    5 years ago

    I love the scale of this towel warmer.


    Quebis Heated Electric Towel Warmer 24" x 12" · More Info

    Photo Source: http://canada.hudsonreed.com/quebis-heated-towel-warmer-24-x-12.html

    I'm trying to make sense of the size. The link shows it as a 12"x24" model but lists nine cross bars on 10" centers. Looks like it's about 30"x60" by my eye with nice fat 2" stainless bars....

  • Hunzi
    5 years ago

    I don't have a towel warmer, but we have a cast iron radiator in the bathroom and we usually toss our towels and clothes on it to warm and later to dry. I like the warm towels and jammies! I miss it in the summer when the boiler is off! Assuming they work well and you have room, I'd do it!

  • busybee3
    5 years ago

    we had a nice large towel warmer in a previous house that was great.... I had it hung quite close to the shower, but unfortunately due to the swing of the shower door, you would have to step out of the shower and around the door to get the nice warm towel!!! I hate the colder air when I am wet and don't like to drip all over the mat and floor so I prefer reaching for a towel while I am in the shower... I would not have another installed unless I could easily reach it from inside the shower.

    but, it was great for drying towels and for hanging the bathrobe on!!! nothing like a toasty warm bathrobe on cold mornings! and when it was really cold, I would drape my clothes on it when I showered so I would have nice warm clothes to dress in!

  • jewelisfabulous
    5 years ago

    John Whipple -- It's an awesome warmer, but from a design perspective it's useless. Look how far away it is from the tub and shower!

  • Shoshana S
    5 years ago

    I'm also on a search for a towel warmer and from what I read to place a towel warmer over bathtub for sure not a good idea. I'm considering a tower warmers with aromatherapy well by Mr steam. or the Amba towel warmers...the reviews for the amba towel warmers are pretty good. Thanks for the insights here

  • mrspete
    5 years ago

    Obviously we all know that electricity and water should never meet ... but what is the purpose here? The towel rack is firmly attached to the wall. You're not going to be any less wet for having reached over 24". How could it ever cause problems?

    Okay, I can see that you don't want anyone to be able to reach an exposed electrical outlet while IN the tub, but the drawing doesn't address which side of towel warmer the outlet can be placed upon, so that doesn't seem to be the answer.

    If you daughter is old enough to handle an electric blanket or electric
    mattress pad on her bed, she can tuck her uniform between the sheet and
    the blanket to get it toasty for the morning. It is much cheaper to
    heat a blanket than a room. :-)

    Kind of like putting your clothes in the foot of your sleeping bag when you're camping so you can wake up to warm items.

    John Whipple -- It's an awesome warmer, but from a design perspective
    it's useless. Look how far away it is from the tub and shower!

    Yeah, that seems to be a real issue with most bathroom layouts.

    Finally, something you might consider instead of a towel warmer: http://tornadobodydryer.com   Designed for handicapped people who have trouble maneuvering towels, this is like a hand dryer for your body -- and it can go right in the shower.

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