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kelleg69

What is the need for sink grates in stainless sinks?

kelleg69
6 years ago

I am doing a kitchen in a vacation home. In my full-time house, I have a cast iron Kohler sink in white that I love. Currently, the vacation house has a stainless sink. I am thinking about doing stainless again b/c we have stainless appliances (not paneled like we do at home). And, because I want to try something different. I am curious, though, what is the deal with the sink grates? I don't like them b/c there is usually food under them. They kind of gross me out. Can someone explain? FYI, we don't cook much at all in this kitchen. We mainly cook something for breakfast like an egg or just have cereal and make sandwiches for lunch. We eat out for almost every dinner. I just wanted people to understand how we will use the kitchen. Not for big, elaborate meals. Also, any advice on what to look for in a stainless sink would be great! Thanks.

Comments (31)

  • gramarows
    6 years ago

    Don't know what "sink grates" are, but from your description, glad I don't, but, the lower the gauge # the thicker and better quality the stainless. And bar keepers friend is 'grate' for sinks.

  • kelleg69
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Maybe the correct word is grid, not grate...


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  • wildchild2x2
    6 years ago

    They raise the items to a better working level in some deeper sinks. Also allow space for washing bits and pieces of flotsam and jetsam down the drain when the sink has dishes or cookware in it.

  • kelleg69
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Ok, then, as a follow up, what is an ideal depth? The sink in there now is really shallow. Is 10 inches too deep? Maybe go for a 9 inch deep sink? Would love advice. I think my sink is probably 10 here. I will measure and see. It never feels too deep.

  • Liz
    6 years ago

    I have a grid in my one-bowl SS sink. I love that it lifts soaking dishes off the bottom, so they don't block water/food that I'm rinsing off other dishes. I haven't had a problem with food getting stuck on the grid, not at all.

  • Buehl
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Since some people don't know what we're talking about, here are pictures of the grids in my sinks:

    .

    Cleanup Sink with SS grids. Tines on right run primarily left-to-right; tines on left side run top-to-bottom:

    .

    .

    Prep Sink with vinyl coated grid. Tines are a checkerboard. I prefer the SS in my cleanup sink above. Alas, they aren't available for my prep sink.

  • Buehl
    6 years ago

    Depth of the sink...that's up to you.

    • Deeper sinks hide dirty dishes better than shallow sinks.
    • Splashing from the water coming out of the faucet can sometimes be more, especially if you have a high arc faucet.
    • However, splashing while doing dishes is less b/c the sink is deeper and will "catch" the splashes.

    One thing to note - if you and your family are tall, you may want to find a deep sink to try using first. The deeper a sink is, the farther down tall people have reach/lean over and it can be an issue. Shorter people are closer to the sink, so they don't have to lean or reach as far down relative to their height.

    If you plan to undermount the sink, the true depth of the sink is the sink depth + the thickness of your counter material. For example, if you have 3cm granite (3cm = 1.2") with a 10" deep sink undermounted, the true sink depth is 10" + 1.2" = 11.2"



  • kelleg69
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Lots of good info! Thanks to those who chimed in. Is scratching a big problem with stainless? How about sound? Finally, what do the gauges mean? Thanks in advance!

  • dcward89
    6 years ago

    Gauge is the thickness of the stainless steel...lower is better, seems backwards doesn't it???



  • lawjedi
    6 years ago

    I have a grid in my super single silgranit. I do love the grids for all the reasons Buehl mentioned. That being said, there is one thing I don't love about it -- cleaning it. I do a quick swipe multiple times a day (I'm cooking a lot) - that's not hard. But it does need to be picked up, turned over and scrubbed on the underside fairly routinely. I look longingly at my dw, wishing I could put it in there, but it's too big. This is an "it is what it is" moment. My sink is big therefore my grid is big. I have pulled it out once or twice thinking maybe I'd prefer it. That lasts all of a few hours before I realize the extra work is worth it to me.

    My grid is the "checkerboard" variety. One habit I've definitely changed: peeling potatoes and carrots is done directly into the garbage or a garbage bowl. The grid and peelings are not good friends.

  • dcward89
    6 years ago

    I absolutely love my sink grid. We have a 36", 10" deep single bowl and the grid serves so many purposes. I hand wash all my pots and pans and knives. The sink is wide enough that I can wash/rinse on the right side and place everything on the grid on the left side to dry without getting it wet like it would if it was on the bottom of the sink. I also love that almost anything can be drying on the grid and it's not visible from the dining room/living room (open concept space). I don't have any problem with food sticking to my grid but we compost all food waste so everything is scraped into the compost bin before placing in the sink. I don't pre-rinse anything that goes in the dishwasher so no food particles from that. Any little bit of food particles left in the pots/pans are very easy to wash down the sink because nothing is sitting on the bottom of the sink to prevent it from washing down. Of course the grid helps with scratches but if you have stainless you have to be ok with scratches. It's patina, don't stress about it.

  • huango
    6 years ago

    95+% of the time, my sink has something in it:

    - a knife

    - a casserole dish soaking

    - whatever that didn't fit into the full/running DW (waiting for the next run)

    My sink is often dirty: leftover food (from the dishes), grease remnant from the lamb stew left on dishes, or the tops of carrots I cut off for kids' school snack.

    -->> So I definitely do not use a sink grid, because that's just another item I have to move out/aside so I can wash out my sink each night/whenever.

    My sink is a workhorse, not a pretty thing to admire.

    ---

    Yes, until GW I didn't know that people use their sink as a washing bowl, ie. to wash out veggies, etc.

    EW.

    I use a large bowl to wash my veggies, etc.

    My sink is never clean enough for that.

    Can't imagine giving a baby a bath in it. ew.

    But I also grew up in Chinese restaurants: yup: sink = workhorse.

    Amanda

  • rococogurl
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    After 2 renos I'm all in for big, deep sinks. In our apartment I had a 33" sink, 10" deep, undermounted. In the house I have a Shaw's 30" x 9". It's great, too, but after working with the extra inches I would only go larger and deeper. Oven pans fit flat. Big pots nearly disappear. I had a pull down with fire hose water pressure but no splashing because it was so convenient to work down in the sink.

    Most stainless sinks today are 16 or 18 gauge. The finish usually is brushed or polished. For very modern kitchens, sinks with square edges are usually chosen. Otherwise, classic edges are rounded. I personally like the 16 gauge as it's thicker, quieter and most durable. These can be very good buys and come with accessories like cutting boards, colanders and racks. Some of the more expensive sinks (my sis has a Franke Orca) have a sort of ledge around the inside where racks and boards can go in at mid-level.

    The newer stainless sinks sometimes have integral cutting board accessories that will fit on one side. So handy! If the sink will be undermounted, just be sure the counter top fabricator knows the accessories need to "work" and made allowances for those in the install.

    Re grids. Went a long time before getting them as they seemed unnecessarily expensive. But they are incredibly convenient. Think of it this way: they create air and space in the sink.

    I never worry about hot pots going in the sink as they go on the grid. I can wash a huge amount of produce on the grid. It doubles as a drainer for small things like the coffee pot or filter or the Cuisinart bowl and lid while I'm cooking something. When I use utensils I just throw them in there and rinse them off. Knives always can be seen on the grid. Anything that might get caught just gets flicked off, or removed with a scrubby.

    I can't bear tubs of sudsy water for washing things. I like running water. So I can soap things up, put them on the grid, give them a rinse with the sprayer and then dry and put them away.

    Stainless is very durable so, technically, the grid isn't needed. But once you have it, you can't imagine not having it. Very handy.

    It does need to be brushed down. And once you see orange gunk on the bottom because you forget to scrub down the underside, you don't forget again. Once a week, I give both sides a wipe down with alcohol.

    Can't see any reason not to get one. Most love them, even those of us who thought we wouldn't.

  • huruta
    6 years ago

    We put in our single deep stainless bowl in Sept. and it came with a grid. LOVE the deep single bowl, but I'm still on the fence about the grid. I use it, but am not sure exactly why. It does collect food bits and it is the enemy of peeling potatoes/carrots. I do like that it seems like a softer spot to place dirty dishes and that the dishes are raised off the bottom but I'm not sure why this matters. Like an above poster I consider my sink contaminated at all times (and hence the grid too) and do not use it as a drying rack for washed dishes. When I'm scrubbing dishes hard it does seems to be a little unstable. It does serve as a trivet for hot pots. I should try not using it and see what we think. I'm sure I could live it without it. But there is something I do like about it.


  • beth09
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I've been keeping house (read, using a sink) for decades and always had a SS sink, and never had a grid. Never even heard of one til I came here! (where have I been?, I know ;)) Anyway, something that comes to my mind is cooking utensils getting caught up in them. Is that a problem for any of you who love them? Thinking tines on cooking forks, my metal measuring spoons that are all tied together, tongs, etc.

  • sjhockeyfan325
    6 years ago

    I've never had a cooking utensil get stuck in the grid, food scraps, definitely. I have mixed feelings about the grid -- great for keeping everything above the level of the "schmutz", but getting the remainders un-stuck and down the drain is kind of a pain. As for gauge of stainless, we have a 16-gauge sink now (Kraus) and it's not noisy at all, and we had an 18-gauge sink previously (Franke) and it was just as un-noisy.

  • beth09
    6 years ago

    Thanks for answering hockeyfan. Really surprised stuff doesn't get hung up! Regarding gauge, I was thinking of going 16 with the redo, but from what you have said, it sounds like there would be no real benefit. Is that correct?

  • sjhockeyfan325
    6 years ago

    I think 18 gauge is absolutely fine if you go with a good brand. I think it starts to get more "iffy" with 20 gauge and higher. I'm no expert, this is just from my own personal experience.

  • wilson853
    6 years ago

    I am able to put the grid to my 32" Kraus stainless sink into my Bosch DW. I remove both of the DW racks and lean the grid in there, and wash it on Sanitize. This probably would not work if it were a grid for a 36" sink. The grid comes out sparkling clean.


  • beth09
    6 years ago

    hockeyfan, so noted. Thanks!

  • annac54
    6 years ago

    I love my sink grids, for all the reasons mentioned above. One thing I haven't seen mentioned, I can leave my scrubby on the grid and it's out of sight and drip dries since it's not laying on the bottom of the sink. I don't have to deal with vegetable peelings too much as I collect those in a bowl and put them in the "green" bin to go to our community compost processing.

    As for gauge of stainless, ours is 16 ga. In my mind, the stronger the better, as it's going to hold several gallons of water which weighs quite a bit. Most of the better stainless sinks have soundproofing material applied to the underside, so that helps with the noise. The grids help with noise too as things are not actually hitting the bottom of the sink.

  • ediblekitchen
    6 years ago

    I think the 18 gauge is probably fine, but 16 will be less likely to dent. In my case my DH really only wants a 16 gauge sink, and since he does most of the dishes, that's what we'll get.

  • sjhockeyfan325
    6 years ago

    Wilson - I've never tried that (but I will) - I have a 30" Kraus sink and also have a Bosch dishwasher.



  • Errant_gw
    6 years ago

    Mine also fit in the dishwasher. I have a 36" Kraus split 60/40 and a tall tub Jenn Air DW

  • Buehl
    6 years ago

    Regarding sound: Most decent SS sinks come with sound dampeners on the underside.

  • Patrick Mulrain
    last year

    .

  • kel_kat5
    last year

    We love ours as it allows for drying while also washing/rinsing.

  • kel_kat5
    last year

    Post

  • Steph H
    last year

    I thought I would love my sink grates, having never had any previously, but for me they are kind of gross. I find myself dedicating a lot of time to scrubbing them clean and it’s not easy to do (we have a 60/40 stainless sink). Maybe the dishwasher is the answer? The black rubber “feet” get the grossest.

  • AnnKH
    last year

    Mine go in the dishwasher.