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How to remove wax build up on wood floors from Rejuvenate products

April SM
5 years ago
I loved the way my wood floors looked using Rejuvenate Floor restore but now over time the Floors have wax build up and its showing scratches.

Anyone have this issue as well and suggestions on the best way to cost effective way to restore (if possible) back to the original finish?

I'm hoping there are other options to choose from with out having to sand down the floors if that's even an option or hire a service?

Comments (135)

  • jaxo
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Even if the house was built in 1938, does that really mean the wood floors were immediately covered over with carpet?

    Is that something people were doing in 1938? Seems more likely carpeting was installed much more recently than the 1930’s.

  • Maggie G
    last year

    I think probably the carpet went on in the 50s or so when that became popular. They looks pretty nice for just having carpets pulled off. I was thinking just give them some oil to remoisturize and then wax them?

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  • katinparadise
    last year

    ...

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ Maggie G...those floors are FULLY finished. Yes there are areas of wear through but the colour and the light sheen tells us there is FINISH left on those floors. If they were unfinished they would be a light 'dusty thirsty' grayish tone. The orange is from the old fashioned oil based finishes. They turned wood 'amber' (aka. orange).


    Do not 'moisturize' them. You can test to see if they have 'wax' on them. Put a few drops of water in a single spot. Leave it sit for a 30 - 60 seconds. If it leaves a WHITE mark where the water was = waxed finish.


    If the water beads on the floor long enough to be wiped up, you have finish on them. If they are truly 'raw' the water will absorb IMMEDIATELY. You will have NOTHING to wipe up.


    Go ahead and pop up a floor vent to see how much wood is sitting ABOVE the tongue. To achieve a full sand and finish (which this floor NEEDS) there must be 3mm of wood above the tongue.


    The reason why they had carpet on them? Because the floors NEEDED to be refinished and the previous owner didn't want to pay the $5/sf. They did the 'quick' fix = wall to wall carpet.

  • Becca Zarko
    last year

    WINDEX WAS A MIRACLE!!! Thank you thank you thank you

  • Lora Norris
    last year

    I need advice please!!! We just moved into a rental I cleaned all the laminate floors with only damp water and Pine Sol. I just wanted them clean. The other day I noticed splotchy stuff on them, well my fiancé took it upon himself to put some kind of shining coating on them. He said it was Mop and Glo, who knows! I am disgusted after cleaning those floors on my hands and knees and they looked perfectly fine.


    He did those on vinyl too, which looks like won’t be much as a problem to remove.


    I read from the manufacturer to remove Mop and Glo to use Lysol all purpose cleaner with no bleach and ammonia. But I have read about using the Windex on here and that it works. The vinegar and water did not.

    Thank you,

    Lora

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    Lysol (the brand) likes to work with Ammonia whereas Clorox (the brand) likes to work with bleach (sodium hypochlorite). Ammonia is a great wax/oil stripper but it is a dangerous chemical by itself. Windex contains Ammonia which is why it works.


    Whichever one you like to work with (Lysol or Windex) will probably work. I prefer Windex because you can buy it by the GALLON and it is cheap and easy to find. With COVID-19 rocking the world, one of the few things you can still find on the cleaning shelves = Windex (because many people don't know that ammonia has the same 'kill rate' as bleach).

  • Lora Norris
    last year

    Thank you very much! You are right. I already have Windex. Lysol on the other hand I see that is more difficult to find. I’m hoping Windex does the trick! I was trying to upload a picture of it, but it’s not working on mobile so I will try to do it through the computer later. I appreciate you replying and glad I stumbled across this post. I did not know that about ammonia so thank you.

  • jennifercook28
    last year

    What can I use to shine my floors after I remove the rejuvenate? We moved in a house 2 months ago and the previous owner used it. Will I wax my floors?

  • jennifercook28
    last year

    This is one view of the floor.

  • jennifercook28
    last year

    .

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ jennifercook28 - You will NOT use anything to make your floors shine. Nothing. Zip. Zilch.


    The polyurethane finish UNDERNEATH all that Rejuvenate is all that is needed. Just get the gunk off of it and leave it be.


    Shine comes when you do a FULL SAND and refinish. To get a shiny floor, you must START with a shiny floor. There is nothing on the market that is allowed to be applied to a fully finished floor. Nothing. Sweeping is your best action to prevent dulling of a wood floor.


    And to be completely honest, your floors might not be refinishable in the future. Sigh. The previous owner has CONTAMINATED the wood. The Rejuvenate PREVENTS sanding and refinishing. The waxy substances in Rejuvenate can penetrate PAST the finish and enter the wood. That means the NEXT attempt at sanding/refinishing could (probably will) end up with adhesion failure.


    I'm sorry to say this, but the high-valued wood floor you purchased with your house may be junk. And that junk was created by the PREVIOUS owner. You are now left holding the bag. In many states there is a way for a buyer to get compensation out of the seller. There is often a time limit.


    If you want to know more, you will need to contact your Realtor VERY QUICKLY. Good luck. Please don't put ANYTHING ELSE on this floor.

  • Toni McCormick
    last year
    last modified: last year

    SJ McCarthy,

    Please tell me what I should be doing differently????

    I don't know if you saw my last post--but to clarify, Bona polish=BAD? Yes? It has wax in it?

    Our floors are milled PECAN wood, with a Satin Water based Poly (2) coats 15 years ago.

    Floors are mostly shiny but scratchy--especially by the dining table--some poly may be scratched off --not sure--would like to "descratch them".

    I mostly mop w damp water. Stopped the whole vinegar thing a few years back as it looked like it was dulling my floors rather than cleaning them. I vacuum 3-4 times a week, damp spot mop monthly, damp full mop 3-4 times a YEAR-- its just my husband & I no pets. Once every 3 years or so I use Bona Cleaner & 3 times in past 15 years Bona polisher and rent a polisher to buff it.

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    Bona polish is a POLISH. It LEAVES material in place (makes it look shiny for several weeks). That material must be REMOVED every 5-6 applications. That means mechanical and chemical stripping (floor stripper on screening pads on a machine).


    The issue with 'scratching' is two parts:

    1. The feet of the chairs. They are the #1 killer of all things 'flooring'. That means felt pads must be used (hot glue + felt pads = year of use before they fall off).

    2. The Finish itself. If you used 2 coats of finish then you have a much more delicate system then if you had gone with the hardier version = 3 coats.

    3. The type of finish. A DuraSeal water born poly is NO WHERE NEAR the same toughness as Bona Traffic HD nor Loba 2K Supra AT. And if you used these BIG BOYS with 3 coats, you would be unable to see the wear underneath the table legs.


    So I'm 'hearing' several things going on here. The amount of finish (don't know what type...if you remember feel free to share) and the table feet.


    There are 'poly pens' you can purchase at Home Depot....but they are most likely 'oil based' polyurethane in them (you might luck out and find one filled with water based poly...). These pens are just like 'stain pens' except they do not have colour in them.


    These poly pens can be used to touch up DEEP scratches (the one's that get down to the wood).


    As for polishes, be FULLY AWARE that use of a polish of ANY KIND can and will PREVENT future sand/refinishing events. And that's why I REALLY hate them. They make an 80 year floor into a 20 year floor just by being applied. And that makes my teeth hurt.

  • Toni McCormick
    last year

    First SC McCarthy-- THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR RESPONSES AND TIME!

    Our dining room table is used as our desk and dining daily. Protective pads are on all table and chair legs --the problem is our shoes over time (15 years of daily use)!


    Are Bona Traffic HD nor Loba 2K Supra WATER OR OIL BASED? I TRIED to get the flooring company to put 2 coats but they so rushed (this was after KATRINA) no go.


    Can a flooring company remove the poly finish w/o having to "sand" the actual floor and apply the above recommended finishes to my floors?


  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    Bona HD and Loba 2K Supra AT are water based. They are the toughest of the tough.


    If your floors are 15 years old, you can get a professional company to do a 'buff and coat'. That is a process where the finish is 'roughed up' and then a new coat is applied over top of what is already there.


    The process is much faster (1-2 days) and is roughly 1/2 the price of the full sand/refinish. A buff and coat should cost around $3/sf (compared to a full sand/refinish = $5/sf).


    A buff and coat will NOT fix deep scratches but it will make your floor look 'fresher' for the next 10 years. Which is what will get a 2 coat floor to the 25 year mark.


    At 15 years old, a 2-coat system is just about at the end of it's 'pretty'. It can still be fully functional but it will look pretty rough.


    Do you have photos? My concern is full wear through (the raw wood is poking through). If you have full wear through (usually found at doorways or under your feet at the desk) you cannot do the 'buff and coat'. The buff and coat relies on a FULLY functional coating. Anything that has raw wood poking through (more than a deep scratch) needs the full sand/recoat.

  • Toni McCormick
    last year

    I will get you some photos--sun should be coming out today. I don't think there is any raw wood peaking out--but I'm not an expert so I will send c/u photos from areas of concern.


    Again, thank you SO much SJ McCarthy! I really appreciate it.

  • HU-330181560
    last year

    Ok I've been using rejuvinate on my floors for 6 months now, but all the sudden my dogs are getting older have started to pee on my floor and it has stained it, I cant remove it. Windex did not work. Please help.



  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    Animal urine can, like all liquids, penetrate through the polyurethane to reach the wood below. Please post photos so that we can help figure out what is going on.


    Please STOP using Rejuvenate on your wood floors. Besides, in 6 months you *should have used ONE application of Rejuvenate...nothing more.

  • HU-884471748
    last year

    Our entire first floor of our home is hardwood. Unfortunately, it has a lot of wax build up. I tired windex and it does remove wax. Problem is such a large area will take forever to remove by hand. Any suggestions for a machine to help remove wax along with Windex?

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    You can hire a flooring professional to screen your floor for you. The old buffing machines (the one's grandma use to have to wax/strip her linoleum) are also worthy of purchase. You need to purchase the correct pads to remove the wax....and you will need a few gallons of Windex.


    A slightly stronger ammonia based floor stripper can be used but you must be VERY cautious about how strong it is an how to use it safely (high ventilation, working in pairs, etc). Ammonia is a powerful and potentially deadly chemical. The industrial strength floor strippers need the user to work with ++ caution.

  • Toni McCormick
    last year

    Oreck has those buffers for rent. I've seen larger commercial sized ones at rental places but they are HEAVY and hard to control.

  • HU-28088798
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Rejuvenate all floors restorer has been a lifesaver for me. It's the best floor shine I've ever used. I don't understand all these negative comments about it. I clean houses for realtors and they rave about how wonderful the floors look after I use rejuvenate on them. I have photos to prove it

    Here are some Photos Before I used rejuvenate all floors restorer. Then I will post the Afters


  • HU-28088798
    last year


    After rejuvenate

  • HU-28088798
    last year

    Another before ..left side is no rejuvenate..right side is with rejuvenate. Is highly recommend this product!


  • HU-28088798
    last year


    No denying the beauty with these photos. Rejuvenate works. You're only supposed to use it every few months or once a year. If anyone is using it weekly or monthly that could be your issue.

  • HU-28088798
    last year



  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ HU-...798 The floors LOOK beautiful but you have never had to tell a customer (who used the Rejuvenate) that their solid hardwood floors that *SHOULD be able to receive 3-4 refinishes can NEVER be refinished. That is to say, their 3/4" hardwood floors are now 'firewood'.


    Nope. I am not kidding. As a 'cleaner' I'm sure you have received praise for producing high-gloss floors. The gloss is temporary but the damage is permanent. The homeowners who purchase a house with Rejuvenate on it are almost guaranteed to have finish failure should they attempt to refinish their floors. By then it is FAR too late to bring the REALTOR and/or his/her cleaner to court for ruining a high-value product such as hardwood flooring.


    As a wood flooring professional I have called 'out' cleaners and homeowners (and Realtors) and ANYONE who thinks Rejuvenate (or OrangeGlo, etc) is a great product. It is death to hardwoods. It contaminates the wood UNDERNEATH the finish (which is not repaired...just hidden under lip the polymer...just like trying to hide mouth cancer with cherry lip gloss). This contamination PREVENTS the new finish from adhering to the wood. This causes thousands of dollars of wasted product/damage. For some homeowners they lose TENS of thousands of dollars worth of flooring.


    All because a Realtor looking to cut corners preferred to 'perk up' the floor with a cheap polish rather than tell the homeowners to spend the money and do a proper job of refinishing a badly maintained hardwood finish.


    And just for fun, try REMOVING the REJUVENATE after the 5th or 6th application (which all of these temporary 'polishes' require). It is hands and knees 'fun in a bottle'!


    Perhaps the next time a Realtor asks you to perk up someone's floors, I recommend you present them with waiver stating you are not legally responsible for ANY DAMAGES the use of Rejuvenate creates. It should cause them to pause long enough to look it up themselves.

  • chuawee
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @SJ McCarthy I have a rental with hardwood floors and I am not ready to sand these yet. Is there anything we can put on these in the meantime to protect them until we sand and refinish? How about Howard’s Restore a Finish? The floors
    were damaged when we had workers rewire the house. Please see photo. thx!



  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    You have raw wood showing. There is no other fix other than a full sand and refinish. The Howard's Restore A Finish is for furniture. It is solvent based and is supposed to 'penetrate' the old lacquer (an alcohol based product). It has HIGH VOC's and isn't meant to be a wood floor finish. It would be a complete waste of time and money.


    Strip down the wood and add 3 coats of finish. It can be DIY friendly...but you have to WANT to save the floors. If you don't care about them, then go ahead and use the band-aide solution. You'll get 6months out of them...maybe.

  • chuawee
    last year

    @SJ McCarthy got it. Thx for the advice. How should these be cleaned in the mean time? is Lysol or vinegar ok? I have a tenant moving in soon and will plan on sanding when they move out.

  • Sue
    last year

    We are moving and where we had our rugs the floor is beautiful but the other areas look dull. Is there anyway to fix that?
    I have Bruce hardwood and only use their cleaner once a month.

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ chuawee Cleaning the floor - at this point - will be pretty basic. I like working with Windex. It has an ammonia base to it which means it has the same 'kill rate' as bleach. Vinegar does nothing...and I mean nothing. It is too weak (of an acid) to do anything but make your house smell like a fish&chips shop. Just be aware that a wood floor with exposed raw wood (like yours) has the potential to cause splinters. You own any/all responsibility if your tenant is injured by splinters. If you can't get a sand/refinish done before they move in, then I HIGHLY recommend you get some BIG area rugs in there to cover up the floors the best you can. You could offer to purchase the area rugs AFTER they move in - to make sure the rugs 'fit' with their decor. That would be a nice touch.


    @ Sue - your floors under the carpet have been spared the wear and tear of life. That's why they look so good. That's normal. Don't do anything. Just leave them alone. If you want to make sure there is no 'residue' left over, go ahead and clean a small patch of floor using Windex Original and some cotton cloths. If you can IMPROVE the look of the floor with the Windex then you KNOW you have residue on the floors. If nothing happens to the floor (visually) then shrug it off and keep going. Wear and tear includes dulling of a hardwood surface.

  • chuawee
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @SJ McCarthy Would you recommend polyurethane or moisture cured urethane? I am told the urethane is harder?

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ chuawee - Lacquer is a product made of alcohol and Lac bug resin (yes...bugs are used to produce real lacquer). I'm guessing someone is using the word lacquer to describe the OIL BASED polyurethanes. They use the word lacquer because the OIL BASED polyurethane (notice 'polyurethane' is in the title of the product?) turns ORNAGE. Sigh.


    I don't like oil based poly. It stinks to high-heaven. It takes 30+ days to fully cure (which makes it tough to get a new tenant in without losing an entire month of rent...possibly 2 months) and off-gasses for eons (ok months...but you get the idea).


    I prefer the HIGH END water based polyurethanes such as Bona Traffic HD (the 'HD' is the important part...don't be fooled by the 'Bona' name - many refinishers say they use Bona only to get you on the hook then they use the Bona Mega which is the low-grade product which has poor performance). I also like Loba 2K Supra AT (the AT is the important part...see above).


    Water based products (especially the good ones) have VERY low VOCs, cure in 5-7 days and the odour is gone by the time you move in.

  • HU-634177058
    last year

    Woah, no. Lacquer is not made from insects. ShelLAC is. I'd say many of your posts, SJ McCarthy, while I am sure are well intended, are not entirely accurate. To say that wood flooring is firewood/trash after having acrylic-based "finishes" applied to them is rather extreme.

  • Toni McCormick
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I googled this: Lacquer is a type of solvent-based product that is made by dissolving nitrocellulose together with plasticizers and pigments in a mixture of volatile solvents. Lacquer also contains a solution of shellac in alcohol that creates a synthetic coating, causing it to form a high gloss surface. The name lacquer derives from the Portuguese name 'lac,' which is a form of resin expelled from certain insects. The specific composition of lacquer thinners vary by brand. However, the three primary ingredients are acetone, toulene and methanol. These are the ingredients that dissolve the lacquer. Lacquer thinners often also include thickeners or waxes.

    Natural lacquer was used as a coating and an adhesive 8000 years ago, by early humans at Kuahuqiao, determined by ELISA

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440318302644


    For more on shellac https://www.doityourself.com/stry/lacquer-finish-vs-shellac#:~:text=One%20of%20the%20major%20differences,a%20variety%20of%20different%20colors.

  • HU-997651138
    last year

    Thanks for Windex advice Rejuvenate come right off. Will never use that product again.

  • Pam Laporte
    last year

    I agree with never using Rejuvenate on your wood floors. We have engineered hardwood and my housekeeper put it on our floors several years ago, since dirt build up has penetrated the wax and ruined our floors. Although the windex works, it will take me months to get this all up as It is 1800 sq feet of flooring. I don't think my back can take it. May need to hire someone to do this for me. Thanks for the windex advice.


  • PRO
    A1 AUTHENTIC WOOD FLOORS
    last year

    30 years in the hardwood flooring business let me tell you rejuvenate is garbage it has ruined so many of my customer's floors! Period!

  • rach_ees
    last year

    Hi! Wow, I have almost the identical floors as OP. Mine are Bruce Engineered Hardwood. They are the American Vintage in hickory, called Tobacco Barn. First photo is an area that isn’t high traffic and the floor is in much better shape- the second are very high traffic areas. There are tons of scratches in them especially where pads were not placed under furniture. I did buy (haven’t used yet) Rejuvenate in an attempt to make them look a little better. Obviously the more I read, the more I am thinking this is not a good idea. Bruce sells a cleaner and a polish- would you recommend the Bruce polish for this? They also sell filler and markers. I wanted to try and freshen them up a bit. I think we can have them professionally spruced up or refinished eventually, at least one time however I am waiting for my youngest to get a little older before we do that.

    Aside from making them look a little better, my largest challenge right now is finding something to clean them with that does not leave a film. I have tried using plain water and microfiber, very diluted pine sol, Bruce cleaner, bona, you name it! Any suggestions for regular, weekly cleaning?

    I really appreciate any advice, I keep reading/hearing conflicting information.

  • rach_ees
    last year

    When we bought this house, I remember the floors were super shiny. I wonder if they used rejuvenate. Maybe I will just try using windex or ammonia to see if that helps.

    Still would like information for regular cleaning. Thank you!

  • SJ McCarthy
    last year

    @ rach_ees


    Cleaning hardwood:

    1. Sweep, sweep, sweep or vacuum (no beater bar...just suction) every few days

    2. Once per week = water-damp microfibre mop head (just to pick up the very fine dust = human skin cells)

    3. Once - maybe twice - per MONTH: pH neutral hardwood floor cleaner (Bruce makes one) on a lightly damp microfibre mop head. You spray the MOP and NOT the floor.

    4. Repeat

    That's it. That's all.


    I'm not seeing any polish on this floor. Your photos show a floor that is a bit beaten up in a high traffic area. As annoying as it is, it isn't unusual to see this with a traditional polyurethane finish.


    You can try using Windex Original formula on your floors. I would pick a spot that is hidden from view (I like behind a door). You will spray the Windex over a 1ft x 1ft spot. You will let it sit for 30-60 seconds (nothing more...nothing less). You will wipe it up with a clean white cotton cloth. If it comes back yellow/orange/brown then you have a polish on their. If it comes up 'grimy' blackish brown then you have dirt...nothing else.


    Please do NOT use temporary polishes (Bruce makes a polish...it is just a version of Rejuvenate or Orange Glo, or Mop N Glow, etc...they are all bad). They put you into a cleaning vortex that can be VERY upsetting.


    It looks like these are engineered hardwoods with HEAVY hand scraping effect. These are *probably not able to be refinished. You can check to see the cross section of the wood to find out how thick the wear layer is. You can pop off a floor register to see the surface layer.


    A regular engineered hardwood requires 3mm of top wood to attempt a single sand/refinish. A heavy hand scraped finish like yours will need MUCH MORE wood to get a single refinish. I would prefer to see 4mm-6mm. Even then, the scraping may be so heavy that parts of the wear layer are too thin to accept a full sand/refinish.


    The *best you can hope for is a buff and coat. That's when a professional company comes in and 'roughs up' the existing finish and then puts down a single coat of finish over top. This gets tricky with floors like yours. You do not know the whole history of the cleaning schedule. And the texture makes this a bad candidate for a refresh. The amount of texture will create voids where the screening pad does not hit. Those areas are likely to have bonding failure. Once the new coat begins to peel, it will become a full failure in no time.

  • rach_ees
    last year

    @SJ McCarthy, thank you so much for typing it out again, I appreciate it !

  • Rossini Pesengco
    11 months ago

    Hello @SJ McCarthy, I wish I had read this sooner, I just applied rejuvenate to our hardwood floors! Is that one application enough to damage it or is it the repeated application? I wanted to have it sanded down and refinished but in our country there's a strict lockdown so 'unnecessary' services are not allowed as yet... our living room area's floors are really in bad condition, nails coming up out of the food and some parts splintering, and wide gaps between the planks. But the wood in the bedrooms are ok. I wonder why this is the case. I live in a tropical country so temperature is usually hot and humid and there's a lot of airconditioning use

  • thekgeezy
    10 months ago

    @SJ McCarthy hello!

    I have read all of the previous chat on this subject and wondered about Minwax Finishing Wax? The renters that lived in our home before we bought it, used a dark Minwax on it right before we moved in. I have never been able to get it to shine. It looks dull 2.5 seconds after cleaning it. They also got the wax all over the baseboards and left a boot print in the wax... do we need to just sand and seal? I know the floor has also had rejuvenate and bona used on it by my parents when they lived in the home. They are very dark hardwood...

  • Brown Dog
    10 months ago

    In the old days, prior to the 70s, women waxed floors regularly (yes, women). Then cleaned them with varsol. Then waxed them again. I remember my mother doing it. But! That was in the days before they knew how dangerous varsol was. Absolutely not recommended for today.

  • SJ McCarthy
    10 months ago

    @ Rossini - just leave the floors alone for now. The wood is already damaged and the nails are no longer holding. Can you post pics? It is possible the Rejuvenate will cause permanent contamination (as in nothing can be done but rip them out). It all depends on how damaged the wood is (ie. how much raw wood is exposed to the Rejuvenate).

  • SJ McCarthy
    10 months ago

    @ thekgeezy


    The wood you have is probably beyond help. You are experiencing the END condition of a badly used/abused/cared for floor.


    Everything you describe SCREAMS OUT contamination. The amount of effort it would take a professional to take off ALL THAT GUNK could be twice the length of time it normally takes to get down to raw wood. A professional cleaning/screening would probably take two days and the pro would burn through DOZENS of screening pads. That would be $3/sf just to get it to the ORIGINAL finish.


    Now imagine the cost of a full sand/refinish? Yah. Now you have another $5/sf. Then you run the MASSIVE RISK (more than 50% chance) that the finish WILL FAIL (peel like a sunburn). The massive amounts of contamination (any ONE of the things listed above can do this on their own) your floor has pretty much doomed it to a 'rip out when ready'.


    You can have a pro come in and offer the cleaning/screening service. Pay the $2-$3/sf to see what you have LEFT of the wood. That's when you decide what to do with the wood. If the finish is in good enough shape you can live on it for a few more years to SAVE UP for the full replacement.


    One thing you can try: Windex Original formula. I would pick a spot that naturally sits underneath a rug.


    I would SOAK a 1ft x 1ft spot with Windex. I would leave it for 60 - 90 seconds (NOTHING LESS!). I would then try wiping it up with a clean, dry cotton cloth. If the cloth comes away with a brown/orange mess on it, then KEEP GOING!


    Soak it again for 60 seconds. Wipe with another cloth. Keep doing the 'soak and wipe' until that cloth comes back with just a HINT of yellow/brown. Now you do the 'mist' and wipe (immediate wipe up). You do the 'mist and wipe' until the cloth comes up 'damp' looking but NO DIRT/COLOUR.


    Now you are seeing a 1ft x 1ft square of your REAL finish. Windex has 5% ammonia content. Ammonia is the 'go-to' chemical in floor strippers. The 5% concentration is the 'mild' version of a floor stripper. The pros will go higher...but it is hard to find those off the shelf at Walmart.


    Windex is found in (almost) everyone's cleaning cupboard. Might as well try it. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

  • linda92
    last month

    I removed Rejuvenate wax from my bamboo flooring to bring it back. I used, in a spray bottle, white vinegar, small amount of Dawn dish soap, and mineral spirits. Sprayed the mixture onto a taped off sect.ion of my floor that was really scratched and hazy. The scratches were in the wax, not the wood. Let the mixt.ure sit for about a minute, and took a wide putty knife, and gently scraped in the direction of the wood grain. Gunk came right up. Sprayed one more time, set for a minute, scraped again. The remaining wax dissolved, then went over the section with a damp cloth, and dried with another cloth. My floor was back!