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Adura Max vs. COREtec

WeShipFloors
October 28, 2016
last modified: December 17, 2018

I just spent a few days at the Mannington Adura manufacturing facility 50 miles east of Atlanta Georgia. As I have stated previously, I feel the Adura Max product is superior when compared head to head with other products, including COREtec. After seeing their data, I am more certain of it than ever. Below is what I learned on my trip:

Scratch Resistance:
Adura Max product has an aluminum oxide finish. They are the only company out there who can have this finish on EVP because they hold the patient on the process. When you're talking scratch resistance, Adura Max is going to win hands down compared to any other product on the market - including Coretec. Rating scratch resistance on a scale of 1 to 10, Adura Max comes in at a 9 where standard UV cured urethane (COREtec) comes in at a 4 or below.

Core:
Adura Max HydroLoc core is a higher density core than others on the market. This mean it is less susceptible to dings and dents.

Locking System:
Adura Max premium locking system is waterproof just like the flooring itself. So when things spill, the moisture will not wick down to your sub-floor.

Sound:
Adura Max has a premium ultraquiet closed cell polyethylene attached pad which gives it a IIC Sound rating of 72, where the cork back has a IIC rating of 65. This is critical in multi-tenant applications where sound abatement is critical.

Pricing:
Even with all the solid advantages of the Adura Max listed above, we can sell it to you at the same price of Coretec.

I strive to provide our customers with the very best flooring product available at the very best price possible. Again, I am highly impressed by the Mannington Adura Max product. There isn't anything else on the market that holds a candle to it in my opinion.

Alan Ward
CEO
WeShipFloors.com

Comments (1.8K)
  • Justine


    Just unpacked one box of the Supercore Oak Natural. Is it normal to have the planks in one box all the same tone? I thought there would be more variation between lights and darks based on the floors I've seen in this thread (Susey's above)?

  • suseyb

    That box may have more of the darker planks. I can’t tell. What does the plank on the far right look like?

  • Lori Adelson

    Dear fellow floor seekers: I asked this earlier but ready to order Adura Max Napa Cork vs Adura Rigid Napa Cork and wonder how to decide which is better for most of the living space in a lakefront Michigan (second) home with dogs. We will use it rear round (but not daily) and wont let it get too hot or cold when not there. Store says either product would be fine. Rigid is cheaper at my seller by a small amount like 30 cents a SF, but is it also BETTER since it can endure more temperature extremes? Anyone have experience w these two lines? My online search for this info is in vain.

  • Justine


    Susey, I took the 3 planks from the right and laid them horizontally on the other planks. They look a little bit lighter this way; however, these 3 look all the same color, so I think it just has to do with the orientation of the planks, not the actual color of the planks.

  • betnotbe

    I definitely noticed the same patterns in one box. We would lay out three boxes and take from each one rather than just working out of one box. The boards aren't exactly the same but they will be a mirror imagine of another board of have the same pattern but further down on a board. Sometimes we'd lay a board down and it looked like it was a continuation of the previous board's pattern. So, short answer, yes I definitely noticed the same tone in one box many times.

  • betnotbe

    Lori, sorry I don't have any experience with the flooring you are talking about. I would think the more temp variation it can take, the better.

  • suseyb

    Those three on the bottom of your second pic are the lightest that were in my boxes. I laid out several boxes at a time, separating the different planks. Sometimes, I would see more of one plank than another. I tried to keep from putting the same plank next to one another when setting the boards out to be installed. I think the floor looks lighter in more natural light than it does when it's in the shade. I'll post a pic from my phone here, now that it's dark.

  • suseyb

    @Lori I would read the installation instructions for the floors you are considering, and see which one best fits your situation. I would also try to talk your installer into Supercore. I believe that Supercore uses a similar (if not the same) type of locking mechanism as some of the better floors out there, and is quite easy to learn how to install. If your installer has installed Adura Max, he or she can install this. You may have to remind the installer that this is not an angle/angle installation. Has your flooring store been able to give you any names of other customers who have installed either product? Maybe that would give you a better direction.


  • suseyb

    Our hallway in indirect light st night. Colors are hard to photograph


  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Lori,

    The rigid will expand and contract less, it should hold up to sunlight better, it will ding and dent less, it will be OK if the property ever lost power in the winter for an extended period.

    Have you priced out the Mannington on our website? We can probably save you a TON of money. Is your installer working for you or for the local retailer? If he's working for the retailer, he's only going to want to install what the retailer is selling.

    Alan

  • betnotbe

    i asked about installing the end pieces before, but I guess I just don't get it. Alan said you install the rail and snap the ends into it. The pieces we have do not fit together. For those who have already installed, did your pieces look like this? We are trying to use these where the supercore ends at a door and carpet begins in another room.



  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    That doesn't look like the track molding profile. I cannot do anything about it until Wednesday.

    FYI - we do have additional molding for your floor arriving at the port tomorrow as well. Call in Wednesday at 8:30 am 1-844-356-6711

    Alan

  • betnotbe

    I'll call in on Wednesday, Alan. Thanks for the reply.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors
    betnotbe,

    Most people glue them down with construction adhesive anyway, track or no track.

    Alan
  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    A new overhead shot of Elaine's Reclaimed



  • Sarah Edrington
    I was told by my local dealer that only the glue down flex planks are made in the US (and adura max is manufactured overseas) ... is this true? also they said that the flex has better scratch resistance than max because it is a newer technology? this seems to be backwards from what I've read online.
  • suseyb

    @Sarah - I have no idea bout the Adura products. Alan would know.


    What is everyone else cleaning their Supercore with? I am potty training my youngest, and want to be prepared in case he has an accident on the new floor. In the past, I have used Thieves cleaner, but I'm not sure that's safe on the vinyl.

  • suseyb

    We are finally finished installing our Supercore on the first floor of our house! We had a slow down because my husband was sick over the holidays. Now we need to finish the baseboards and quarter round! The bathroom was our last room.


  • gotoran

    "What is everyone else cleaning their Supercore with?"


    Susey, in your situation, you might want to start with toilet paper. :D

  • suseyb

    @gotoran - LOL. This one is quite the pill. I made *him* get the tp to clean it up.

  • cherylbirth

    Okay, we FINALLY got some walls up in the kitchen! I'm planning on running the flooring perpendicular to the front door (excuse the crude drawing, just to give you a sense of how the house is laid out. It's not to scale). My question is, which end of the room should I start with? One end overlooks the den and has the railing instead of a wall. I'm not sure how to end or begin on that side of the kitchen since there's no quarter round to cover up the edge. Alan, how would you do it?










  • Nancy

    I'd think of using a reducer strip butting up along that flat white trim that holds the balusters (the one called "square nose/end cap/threshold"). Another option would be to use T molding to cover the raw edge of the flooring and the white flat piece that holds the balusters. But since it looks like the balusters are flush with the edge of the white board, the square nose/end cap might work better. You'll end up with an area that might collect dirt, but after the flooring is installed you could caulk along that gap to minimize gunk collection!


    Remember, floating floors should NOT be installed under cabinets, so flooring isn't your next step.

  • cherylbirth

    The cabinets we're installing are from Ikea and they hang from a rail attached to the wall so I *think* it would be okay. At any rate, it has to go under the legs because the toe kick snaps onto them.


    I'll have to look up the type of molding you're talking about, but thank you!



  • Nancy

    Hanging cabinets with minimal fixed weight on the floor should be fine! We all want pictures when it’s done!

  • Marley Soluna

    This thread is awesome! I was ready to order some LVP from Lowe's, but I read the warning in the instructions about no direct sunlight and hesitated - the abundant natural light in my house is one of my favorite features, I'm not interested in replacing my sheers with real curtains or, heaven forbid, BLINDS, blech - so I googled "luxury vinyl plank direct sunlight" and fell down a rabbit hole of horror. This article and its accompanying pictures were enough to convince me I needed to find something else. Luckily, that same rabbit hole brought me to this other Houzz thread, which then led me to the WeShipFloors website and then back to Houzz for this particular thread on the development of SUPERCore. I spent a ridiculous amount of time over the past several days reading all 1800+ posts in this thread, and you all have asked and answered every question I had and even some I didn't think of. Learning about the history of SUPERCore and the comparisons to other products has been incredibly helpful and reassuring. I really appreciate all your contributions, thank you!


    I am so super stoked for my samples to arrive - only two more days!!

  • Nancy

    Marley, I think anyone who reads ALL the posts in this thread deserves some kind of award! Hope you love your samples.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    cherylbirth,


    Threshold/ Endcap is what you need for the railing .


    Alan

  • suseyb

    What colors did you order Marley?

  • Marley Soluna

    They came today!! A whole day early, very super exciting!


    Susey, I got a sample each of Acacia Sunrise, Tennessee River Hickory, Lumberjack, and Solitude. They're all gorgeous, but I'm kinda leaning towards Solitude or Lumberjack because they're more variegated. I think they'll be a little better at hiding the filth my husband tracks in from the garage - I have a trail of three mats and two rugs at the entrance, and it's still not enough to remind him to wipe his feet. I can't wait to get rid of this carpet.

  • cherylbirth

    I hope this question makes sense. If I lay the boards so that they're going long way through a doorway, how to I connect boards to the side you don't normally attach to? If I turn the boards the other way I eliminate the problem but the the boards would be parallel to the front door opening.


  • suseyb

    @cherylbirth - Can you take a picture of what you are trying to accomplish?

  • cherylbirth

    Okay, I hope this makes sense. It's not clear from this drawing but there's a doorway at the top right of the stairs in the kitchen leading into the foyer. If I start laying flooring running horizontally as the picture is shown, and I start at the "bottom" of the kitchen, I will eventually come even with the door to the foyer and run a board into it. But there will be space behind it that would need to be laid and it would be the "wrong" side of the board to attach to. I'm guessing I'm probably not making any sense!



  • Nancy

    You mean you’d have to “backfill”? It’s possible to do. Try it with a few boards or scraps, if you're doing supercore with the drop and lock end joints you’ll have to see which way (right to left or vice verse) works best when backfilling.


    (Backfill is my word for it by the way). .

  • gotoran

    Anybody know if there's a way to make a right turn from one hallway into another using a 45 degree joint that's flush with the rest of the floor...ie...like you could do with a real wood floor?

  • Nancy

    I don’t think with the click mechanism that it is possible without a transition.


    However, since you can use carpet tape to repair individual planks and fix in a new plank, maybe you could do the same to make a right angle transition? It would take some precision cutting though.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Nancy,


    Who specified using carpet tape? This would secure the floor down.


    It you have to attach a plank without clicking it (like to slide under a door jamb), we sell an adhesive so you can glue the two planks together.


    You can also use the adhesive to do a board replacement in the middle of a room. No, you do not have to unclick the whole job. Say you have one board that the click is broken and you did not find out until the job was finished. This is how you would fix it:

    • You saw the broken board down the middle the long way
    • Trim the lower lock off the two sides that have it
    • Apply a tiny bead of adhesive on the locking mechanism of the perimeter boards
    • Drop in the new modified lock board
    • Weight it down until the glue dries

    The above board replacement procedure can be used with any SPC or WPC floor out there.


    This "may" work on turning the boards 45°, but I will have to test it out. The locks on the ends are made entirely different than the locks on the sides. PLUS, you would then be starting with every single board 5 feet long which would look goofy. A T mold may just have to be used. :(


    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    CherylBirth,

    You can click the floor in running backwards, it will take a little trial and error to do so.

    This is what I would do in your situation.

    • Measure from the wall on bottom left in the kitchen up the wall until you are into the door that passes into the foyer. Figure the face width of a single plank of floor and measure out to break on one of these units. (i.e. a plank is 7" wide, you would go 7, 14, 21, 28" etc.) Take into consideration dealing with the undercut of your door jamb. It would be nice for the click to just tuck underneath with no cutting of the board needed. Determine the best measurement and make a mark on the subfloor on the left wall.
    • Take this same measurement and measure on the opposite wall on the right by the front door and make a mark on the subfloor.
    • Chalk a line on the floor between the two marks and use this as your reference line. (through the foyer door) This line will be your reference that you measure off of to lay the kitchen, the foyer and the closet.
    • Measure from the chalk line back to the lower wall, but stop 3 plank widths back.
    • Transfer this measurement into all three room, making a mark on the right and left of each room and then chalk a line. This is your 3 board back starting reference.
    • Lay 3 rows in each room making sure after they are installed the third row breaks perfectly on the 3 row back line you chalked. (You should be able to slide the locked boards around as a unit if these are not huge rooms) Do this in all three rooms.
    • Bring your 3 rooms of installed floor out at the same time. When you get into the doorway, you should be able install right through it making the three rooms tie in perfectly.

    Sorry, I get long winded. I should do a video.

    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Some of you may wonder why you should use a chalk line as the reference and just not the wall down the lower side itself. The issue is houses usually aren't square, but the flooring is.

    Also above, when you chalk the line through the doorway. It is not a bad idea to check the measurement from this line up to the wall into the living room to check it's squareness to the project. The primary reference line through the doorway can be fudged up or down on one side or the other to make how the floor breaks on the living room wall look right. Believe it or not, a person can easily pick up the boards being off by a 1/2" squareness from one end of the wall to the other.

    The walls you should worry about are INTERIOR long walls, not the exterior walls. People look down interior walls, but rarely do they look down exterior walls. The longer the wall, the more variation in plank width can be picked up.

    What we are trying to do is make it so when you walk into the front door and look through the foyer door into the kitchen, the whole job is straight as an arrow. We also want this long run to have the planks ripped the same width all the way down the wall going up against the living room wall, which makes all the rips the same width inside the living room itself on that wall.

    Depending on how your foyer door breaks with the flooring plank width, the start of the project may need to be with ripped boards along the lower wall as well. We don't care what the lower wall looks like, we want the doorway to look good (and be easy too)

    Like I stated above, most houses are out of square to a degree. The non-square can be compensated for by using a chalk line as a reference point instead of the walls themselves.

    After this, you'll walk into your friend's homes and be critiquing their flooring installations....lol

    Alan

    I've not been posting in here enough, making up for it :-)

  • cherylbirth

    Alan, a video would be great! I'm very visual and having a hard time picturing what you're explaining above. Nancy, that's exactly what I meant. :)

  • suseyb

    This video helped us to plan the layout for our floor, to ensure that we managed our long hallway well, and also to ensure that we had wide enough strips of plank on both sides of the hallway. Where to start vinyl plank


    And Alan, you rock! Thanks for your sage advice!

  • Nancy

    Sorry my bad. I said carpet tape but you’re right, that wouldn’t work.


    US Floors has posted on the big coretec thread how to cut out a plank and replace it if needed. It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in.

  • Nancy

    Sorry my bad. I said carpet tape but you’re right, that wouldn’t work.


    US Floors has posted on the big coretec thread how to cut out a plank and replace it if needed. It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in.

  • suseyb

    Are y'all putting rug pads under your rugs or purchasing rugs that have no latex in them? If you are purchasing latex free rugs, where are you finding them?

  • Chessie

    ". It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in."


    That's the issue I have with these locking floating floors. With a glue down, you just heat it, pull it up, and put a new one down. Easy. Having to cut off a part of the plank...that just can't be a good thing. I would worry about how long that will hold up.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Only the bottom of the lock is cut off. The repair the way we recommend doing it is permanent. I will do a video.


    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    We are now offering a 30 Day Money Back Guarantee on SUPERcore flooring. See website for details. - Alan



  • Joshua Kim

    so i think i'm pretty sold on the supercore product. found it while looking up articles on LVP and found one on Mannington. My search for Mannington brought me to Houzz and WeShipFloors. Then this thread and Supercore!


    I noticed that on the KryptoniteFloors.com there are less options than on WeShipFloors.com and there is a SuperCore Enhanced product.


    Can you talk about the Enahanced line?

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Kryptonite is the name we list all "house brand" vinyl floors that we carry on WeShipFloors.com. When we started making SUPERcore we started it under that name but it quickly evolved into it's own line of product.


    Enhanced is part of the "Originals" line. It's the products with painted beveled edges.


    Alan

  • M W

    @suseyb- we found felt rug pads at RugPadUSA

  • suseyb

    Thanks M W! I have some rugs ordered, and will see how it goes. I'm not sure how the felt pads will do in an entryway, so I ordered a ruggable for that area. I mopped our kitchen floor again today, and I just love it! It's super easy to mop. Once we finish the trim, I can take more pics of the other areas of the house that have the Supercore.

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