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My Craftsman-Influenced Midcentury Modern Kitchen Addition

Milly Rey
4 years ago

I figured I'll start a thread for my incredibly slow kitchen addition that's coming up. Got a lot of small tasks to finish up first indoors.


Let's play a game called How Much Will My Kitchen Addition Cost!!!


Categories are:

Under $50k

$50k-$100k

$100k-$150k

$150k-$200k

$200k-$250k

And just for Sophie .... more than $250k


The house is a midcent modern split level with a lot of stone and cedar, exposed rafters, and other lingering craftsman influences. It's got carthedral ceilings on all the upper levels. It has the original kitchen, which was once high end interior designer, all custom frameless, but absolutely horrible in every way when it comes to actual cooking. Adding on will be much better than remodeling.


I'll help you out a little by saying that the ballpark estimates given by GCs and an architect ranged from $300 (a low end builder) to $500 (architect) a square foot, not counting the outdoor space. Average for the region (high COL area) is about $350-400.


Size of addition? 370sqft, counting walls. About 28.5' by 13'. Cathedral ceiling rising from 101" (8'5") to 125" (11'4"). Three existing boxed beams will have a decorative fake beam over them and two more added.


An existing 5'x4.5' pantry is going to be enlarged to 5'x7' and included. This is going to be a pain.


I have done a lot of DIY in the past, but this time, noooope. I might assemble a few cabinets. I'm not even going to paint.


I have a covered patio that is going to be the future location of the kitchen. It has a foundation wall already. The roof is already part of the house. No structural changes will be needed. But part of the addition will have to cantilever 2' over the existing cmu block foundation on two sides. The porch slab can't be used. A new joist system must be installed instead that will float over the slab and rest on the existing foundation wall.


There is a ton of demo work to be done. A decorative deep (6") stone veneer must be demoed. A small 10x18' deck must be demoed and rebuilt--larger, 12'x28'. I'm going to be getting a steel and fiberglass translucent deck system for it. (Supports still wood.). Grading also must be redone now rather than later. There is also the world's weirdest scalloped concrete apron--ends up being the equivalent in concrete of a 4-step stair 24' wide. Must go. I actually need the broken concrete in an erosion control project elsewhere, so at least I don't have to pay for disposal. Existing ceiling must go.


There will be 22' of continuous windows. Fiberglass triple pane, white. Counter to cathedral ceiling. One outside door--36" roughin, glass. There must be a step. Stain grade oak tread and riser, more than 4' wide.


Electrical system to house must be entirely upgraded, including a sub panel. Electrical plan will include ambient can and strip lights, like these: https://www.lightology.com/index.php?module=cat&cat_id=438 Also included will be a modern designer chandelier above the sink and subtle pendants above the dining table. Will have provision for future in-cabinet lighting, if I don't do it now. Wall washers for one side. Kable light task lighting over all counters. Toekick led tape. Outdoor lighting in leaves. Must have 3 circuits for small appliances, 2 for fridge/freezer, 1 for dining and pantry, 1 dedicated microwave, 2 dishwasher, 1,double oven, 1 warming drawer and hood circuit together, 2 for disposer/instant hot water, plus lighting. Got electrical contractor already. Counter outlets will be plugmold and pop up.


HVAC will go on existing zone. We have the capacity already for addition. I have to destroy my basement again to run supply and return. Got HVAC guys already.


Plumbing will take water from a 1" supply across the opposite exterior wall. Drain will run next to HVAC in basement. Can't tie into main drain indoors. Must do it outside, underground. 2 sinks, 3 faucets, 2 dishwashers, 1-2 disposers, 1 fridge with ice maker. Got plumbers already. Will have gas line run but not connect it to anything at this point.


Ceiling insulation will be spray foam with fire retardant. Only way to get up to recommendations. Everything else will be fiberglass. We will have T1-11 siding temporarily. The siding upgrade won't come until we do a second addition.


Cabinets will be IKEA with IKEA doors. Got about 30' of lowers, 22' of pantry cabinets, 8' of appliance cabinets, and 20' of horizontal cabinets. Will also have 10' builtin bench seating. Will need new table. Going custom this time. Will also have narrow 18 inch by 5-6' stainless steel table as island with adjustable stools.


Appliances will include a 36" induction cooktop with great wattage outputs, a higher end extending downdraft, one new cover panel ready dishwasher (already have another DW to reuse), one 26 cubic foot or greater French door fridge in stainless with an ice and water dispenser, a 24-30" vertical all freezer unit (for pantry), a double oven (probably steam), probably a panel ready warming drawer, instant hot water.


Two modular sinks. One 45" and one 30". Three pull down faucets, chrome finish.


Backsplash: To ceiling on one side of wall, 22' wide. Something spectacular and designer but modern. Tile.


Flooring: will have to be subtle. Either LVT or tile. Will be redoing old living room, pantry, old kitchen, and old dining (about 600 sqft?) in LVT (not included in estimate), but lower main part of the kitchen will probably be large scale porcelain.


Must redo half bath after this.


Plan for eventual outdoor kitchen on the new deck. Will have lighting added to eaves during remodel but that will mostly be a later task. Not included in kitchen cost.

Comments (40)

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Forgot the quartz counters.

    Before!

    All painted surfaces grow mildew within 6 months of painting. The forest shade makes everything stay damp. I'm so done with fighting it. No more exposed wood!

  • just_janni
    4 years ago

    I think I have to side with Sophie on this one. That is a metric crapton of work to be done in ALL the systems to support this addition.

    Keep us posted - love your forest location!

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  • Mrs Pete
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I'll help you out a little by saying that the ballpark estimates given by GCs and an architect ranged from $300 (a low end builder) to $500 (architect) a square foot, not counting the outdoor space.

    Well, since we know you have 370 sf ... we know that the price is between $110,000 and $185,000.

    It's a BIG kitchen. You're skimping on cabinets but splurging on countertops, custom table, and appliances. You're not doing any DIY. Electrical is expensive.

    I'm going with $200k-$250k, which I find pretty incredible since I live in a $150,000 house (yeah, low cost of living area).

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I could get a house cheaper than that near here, but it would be a shell and I would get shot. :)

    It's really aggravating because I bought this MCM house at a pretty steep discount because of the kitchen, bathrooms, and the fact that it was a MCM split level--I knew it would be super desirable soon but was still a HUGE turnoff in this market then.

    But now I get mostly very expensive estimates for most things once folks see my house--and make comments about how huge it is (it's not, but it is very well laid out). There are definitely prices for certain homes that are different from regular prices!!!!!

  • rockybird
    4 years ago

    How exciting! I am going to go with Sophie also on this. I'm doing two additions to a midcentury modern home (medium cost area) and based on this experience I'm going with the higher number.


    Feel free to share more pics of your mcm home! :)

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I don't decorate faithfully MCM. :). I would probably disappoint! I feel entitled because neither did the original owners! Even the light fixtures are a mix of styles. (Almost all were original when we moved in--we only pitched the bath ones because they were AWFUL.). We have the "schoolhouse lighting" everyone was crazy about in the master. Classic MCM globe pendants in the current kitchen/dining. A 1940s style pendant in the upper hall. A classic MCM "coolie hat" light in the lower hall.

    The original owners had a lot of the cabin-in-the-woods oils that everyone had then. It makes me happy because I have one, too.

    Here is the current kitchen. Lighting is terrible--phone pics don't cooperate well with soft white bulbs. Laminate original cabinets. Yes, they go to the ceiling!!!! The ones missing doors fell off after we moved in! The double ovens tried to set fire to the house, so I ditched them, but all appliances were originally stainless. The countertop is a 1980s replacement--their original 36" cooktop died--plus my temporary kludge to wedge in a dishwasher. I suspect the original was actually stained wood (!!!!!!) as there was a wood counter in the bathroom.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Other side. Ikea door is missing because it had to be returned. I haven't installed the new one yet. The chickens are going. :). The buffet was foisted on me by a friend and is used as a cabinet. (Long story--she needed to make Mom happy.) . The counter was $6 Lowes clearance.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Oh, The backsplash is weird because the hood broke and I ripped it out. I hated it. Previous owners were TINY and installed the hood so low that I couldn't see into my pots! (I'm barely above average height) The light used the wiring that was sticking out of the wall. The rest was scrap wood and leftover paint. Not MCM at all!

    Other special features: the original kitchen had no drawers and the peninsula cabinets are only 18" deep, but the 80s counter is 24" deep and overhangs the cabinet fronts.

    Why would tiny people install huge cabinets? No idea, but they clearly barely cooked.

  • DrB477
    4 years ago

    probably 200k

    part of it depends on how disciplined you are in sticking to budget vs getting what you want.

    Just finished a roughly 500 sq ft addition to expand/renovate kitchen, add mudroom, and add a big walk-in closet. Initially ballpark was 180k, probably could have kept it to 220k or so after layout was optimized and some additional structural issues had to be addressed, but I just couldn't stomach spending 200k+ and not getting what we really wanted in terms of function, finishes and appliances. So we ended up in the low 300s. I couldn't see spending 200k and putting in Ikea anything.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I love IKEA's boxes. The hardware is top notch. One day, I will want to swap out some of the doors for an amazing bookmatched figured veneer, but that will be AFTER kids.

    And I'm not spending $300k. Lol. ;)

  • aprilneverends
    4 years ago

    ..following:)

  • PRO
    Anglophilia
    4 years ago

    This is a BIG project. I think you'll be lucky to do it for $200,000 if you go with high end appliances and finishes, a bit less if you do mid-range.

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen
    4 years ago

    Your categories don't go up high enough. :)

  • mobuddy89
    4 years ago

    Miley, are you moving ahead now that you have got a few bids? Or is the sticker shock having you save a bit more before proceeding?

    I appreciate you talking about costs. It is the one thing I find that is constantly missing here and on the TV shows.

    But I am going to guess $175K?

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I'm GCing but not DIYing. I've both GC'd and DIY'd before! :) It's going to be a slooooow build to save costs.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Haha, Cook! You can make your own categories. :)

    I want to be clear that you can actually get things cheaper with the right GC if you're going super custom and specialized. They know the fabricators who can do amazing things. They have all kinds of trade relationships that I don't.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    First purchase: my modular sink! I saw The Galley sink and fell in lurve: http://thegalley.com/galley-video-highlights/

    THIS IS WHAT I NEED IN MY LIFE. I don't, however, need it for $6000, which. Is their price. Unless the sink is at least 36", it can't be a true workstation. Closer to 48" is better. So I found a bunch of sinks like it that are at least 36":

    Kohler

    Elkay

    Create Good Sinks

    Julien Smartstation

    Rutavi

    I found the Rutavi 45" for just under $1k on Wayfair (sticker price $2.5k.). (While I would prefer 60", I would also prefer a bigger kitchen. Which I would really need for it.) Then it went on sale for $780. With my 10% coupon, I spent $744.11 of my $2k sink-and-faucet budget on my big sink!

    Kitchen running total: $744.11

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    4 years ago

    Bear in mind, there are expenses, and there are costs. Sourcing cheepchinesecrapola products saves on the initial expense, but adds to the ultimate costs.

    All in all, saving 5K on a 300K project just pays for the vacation you need to take when the project is done. True savings doesn’t really come from materials. It comes from reducing the scope of work.

    You will be lucky if this comes in under 300K. Very lucky. Old houses eat money like fat boys eat pork rinds. You’re going to have to deal with seismic retrofitting that may make that foundation cheaper to tear down and rebuild than to use as is. That many windows is going to need steel reinforcement for the shear wall construction.

    You're under estimating the nuts and bolts behind the scenes. First stop is a structural engineer to see if that foundation is usable with modifications or if it will be easier and cheaper to just do new.

    Second stop is red tape central. Your local permitting office. Find out what’s new that you need to get up to speed on. All of the LED lighting and low flow plumbing is probably familiar. Other things like arc fault and make up air may be less so. Find out what their current hot button red tag is all about. Could be sprinkler systems given the current issues and the size of the house.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I'm on the other coast! No seismic retrofitting. And not quite close enough to the beach that I have to deal with beach issues--it takes us nearly half an hour to get there.

    I already have a quote on electrical upgrade. Red tape is wrapped into the cost. It's not so easy as arc fault. I have to have the ENTIRE service to the house upgraded and the main and subpanels completely replaced. Right now, I couldn't add a bath fan to my current system. Lol. It's that bad. We had to cannabilize the old double oven circuit for the geothermal.

    Guys do good work, and I'm getting the subpanel basically free.

    Electrical is happening in December. There is still a list of things in the current house that are being addressed. Just comestics--changing out closet doors, filler panels, paint touch up, etc.

    Foundation has already been cleared. I don't remember the costs on that.

    Here was my little multi-weekend project. Look at this DIY trash! (Yes, I got rid of the leaves last week. No, it didn't last. Have todo it every week until December.). Next comes putting in a Belgian block curb and gutter. That's why there's no tile on the front. My driveway is just a little longer than everyone else's, but this means that the postal workers won't come up it and fling my boxes into my flower bed instead. I just threw together some loose pavers, and they used that for a while, but it looked like crap, and weeds grew up in it. So this is my more permanent solution.

    My neighbors and I are installing a matching curb and gutter. We are too rural for the county to do it, and they last replaved the road when oil was really cheap and messed up everyone's drives by just increasing the thickness of the asphalt. They really messed up in front of my house by laying about a foot of asphalt on top of my driveway and what used to be lawn with no sub base, trying to fix the grade problem they created. Unsurprisingly, all this has cracked and looks terrible. The granite curb and gutter will take care if all that.

    They cannot ever add a sidewalk without dramatically widening the road, which they will never pay for. Theoretically, we could lose our curb to county improvements, just like we could lose our easement gardens. Realistically, never gonna happen. Worth the risk.

    I don't have a brick mailbox because people manage to hit it sometimes. I don't even know how. But it's not worth the repairs. This one is easily straightened.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Other coast? Basic seismic and high wind requirements have become pretty standard in much of the US construction. Remember that most of the country is actually close to an earthquake fault. Not just SoCal. Or high wind zone. See Houston hurricane damage. There was a 3.9 quake day before yesterday originating in Jonesboro, AR. The New Madrid is close enough to N Miss that Simpson tie downs are on every project. Adds maybe $300 in materials. Maybe $1500 in labor.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    My "cheap Chinese crapola" sink:

    Company is headquartered in Austin. Products are independently tested. T-304 grade steel, 18% chromium and 10% nickel. Certified lead free. 16 gauge. Sound dampening package. Limited lifetime warranty. Sunk grid included. (So is a colander and cutting board.)

    I'm good with that and not silly enough to think that everything out of China is crap.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    I should be clear that the joist system will be above the slab and foundation wall but NOT truly floating. I misspoke! Sorry. It's not just hanging out there to wriggle as it likes.

  • schicksal
    4 years ago

    150-200K, but that comes from never having paid someone else to do a kitchen.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    My record for cheap additions was 560 sqft for under $20k. But that was because I had some unconditioned spaces that could be made conditioned with a little bit of construction, a touch of plumbing, and moderate electrical but mostly drywall and insulation. (No, I didn't convert a garage.). I did all the flooring, painting, trim, and most of the demo and worked next to the building crew hanging drywall, etc. I didn't know how to mud and tape back then. That was a while ago. My construction crew was 2 guys (or a guy and a gal--actual folks variel, all worked for same GC) for $65/hr, plumber was $85/hr with apprentice, electrician was $65/hr alone. Low COL and I did T&M.

    I predict this will be less than $200k. :)

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I'm not saying it will be any SMALL multiple of $20k. Lol. But less than ten times it.

    I made my second purchase: the main fridge. I am pulling the cabinets off the back wall 6". This means that a full depth fridge can sit like a counter depth fridge, nonintegrated--either with 1-3" on either side of the door or with the frame (not doors) flush to the cabinetry. I am really, really squeezed for wall space the places where the fridge might go, so I'm taking option #2.

    I had originally thought to put Whirlpool Sidekicks or Fischer and Paykel side-by-side whole fridge and whole freezer in my one other location. Their doors wouldn't have opened all the way but enough to get shelves and bins out, and they could look fully integrated with their trim kits. But I knew my family would love the water and ice, and the F&P (the one with ice) had LESS fridge space than our current fridge. And the Sidekicks have been having compressor problems recently. And Whirlpool has a TERRIBLE finish that shows every smudge! Other options were too big or not in the budget, and I desperately need more fridge space. So I settled on moving the fridge to a better location and getting a deeper French door fridge (only want deep if the food is eye level).

    I want to try the fridge for a good long while before I make my cabinet order. I want to make sure we now have enough fridge space for all the produce. This is a constant problem at our house. If I don't have the space, another fridge is going in the pantry.

    I could have gotten a Frigidaire gallery for $1600 (plus tax and extras). The finish is GREAT. But the water is warm in Frigidaire models! And too many people said it was loud. (I couldn't look it up--this isn't listed for fridges.) And when I brought the containers I used for test storage, it didn't work that well. The LG had great fingerprint resistance in black stainless (which I love and will look great), and I really like the ice in the door, but the freezer drawer doesn't pull out all the way, and the black stainless chips! Samsung's black stainless also resisted fingerprints great. It felt the sturdiest to use and had a great layout for us. It also has the 10 year compressor warranty, like LG.

    Samsung and LG have gotten a lot more reliable the last 5-10 years and the older brands have gotten less reliable. It seems that most problems occur within 3 years, so I did get the 3 year extended warranty because of how much more complicated these fridges are. I was within budget, but not cheap--$2242.77, with a credit for recycling the old fridge. My refrigeration budget is $4000.

    The fridge: https://www.ajmadison.com/cgi-bin/ajmadison/RF28HFEDBSG.html

    Running total: $3036.88.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    4 years ago

    "I'm GCing but not DIYing. I've both GC'd and DIY'd before! :) It's going to be a slooooow build to save costs."


    Since this is probably the only project you'll GC this year, and the subs are going to know that, you won't have nearly the leverage over them that a GC who throws them 100K in work every year does.


    Good luck, but we don't want to hear about how no one is showing up and the ones that do are arguing over where and when whose work stops and starts.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    My core team consists of A. people I've used before, B. my weekend guy whom I give $15-30k of work to per year normally, and C. neighbors (lots of contractors in the neighborhood).

    I expect it to be slow. I don't care. I work from home. I hope to be in the kitchen by Christmas 2019.

    BTW, the addition is my first superinsulated project. The roof won't meet requirements until the roofing is redone, but the rest should. Going to be interesting, indeed, and would cost an absolute FORTUNE with a GC--like $600/sqft and up--because it would require so much hands-on with the subs.

    I pay T&M for pretty much everything. And I guarantee hours per day. I won't call you for less than 4 hours of work, and I usually make it 8. I let my regulars work me in sometime over the next 2 weeks from a call. I'm good with that. I fill holes in their schedules.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    So tired and cranky today, but the fridge comes tomorrow. The original stainless fridge from the 60s was 42" wide and about 66" tall.

    My current fridge I bought as the biggest cheap thing they had when I bought my first house 15 years ago. I didn't replace it before out of guilt--can't get rid of something that works, right? It's been slowly dying recently and I didn't want to replace it now until I knew what I wanted for the new addition.

    The new fridge is 70" tall. This is a problem. The cabinets are made for the original owners' original fridge. (By the way, all the light switches and power outlets in the room were originally stainless or chrome, too.) So I had to take down the old upper cabinet on that wall. It was about 6' wide--custom built to the space. Took the doors off--no problem. Then I realized it was wedged between the cabinet doors of the cabinets on the other wall and some cabinets I put up. I had JUST finished emptying the cabinet--partially into my newer cabinet. The last thing I wanted was to take it down.

    i tried to beat it apart, but the nails and glue had made it 50 years and weren't taking anything from me. I knocked off some framing bits only to discover that now it was caught on the door frame. Argh.

    So it was saws-all time. I was tired and not thinking straight, so my first choice of cut was stupid. Whatever. Got it eventually. My preschooler was thrilled to help carry when everything was over.

    Doors off and shelves out and trim bit beaten out... (The little pantry opened every time I hit the upper cabinet.)

    The most unkindest cut of all....

    Gone! And ready for fridge delivery. Original paint, also yellow.

  • schicksal
    4 years ago

    Ok those cabinet pulls are awesome! I wouldn't let those go to the landfill.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    They're all mucky in person, unfortunately.

    I've been thinking about saving them for the new pantry, but I will need to have them refinished. They had a protective layer to keep them shiny and brass, but it didn't wear well.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    New fridge came. Much drama getting water connected. Got to actually practice a lot of Spanish, though, which is cool.

    The previous fridge didn't have a working ice maker, and LOTS of plumbing work had been done in the house during this time. I knew better but didn't insist on flushing the line before connecting. Once the water wouldn't flow, I eventually convinced installer to flush first the line from the wall and then the length of tubing. By then it was too late! Fridge was stopped up internally. Installer was flummoxed. I cranked up the PSI from the well and kept washing the filter. Third wash worked.

    Kicking butt and taking names!

    The previous fridge had leaked for a year. Only a small ridge of Pergo was damaged at all. You have to get down on the floor to notice it n I didn't bother to clean it up after the first month, either. Whatever the original owners first installed is, sadly, long gone.

    New fridge is SO much easier to see things in. I hope we will have addressed most of my husband's habit of opening two gallons of milk at the same time and shoving food in the back and abandoning it. I can put four gallons on the door--key for me. (Used to be zero.) Even with that, I can fit almost all of the door stuff in the rest of the door containers.

    This is a bad time of the week to show how much it holds because I've cooked all the produce--and we have eaten down the fridge a lot. Still, I can stack the Rubbermaid Premeir 9 cup containers 2 deep on the edges--also important.

    Without a custom depth future fridge cabinet, I would hate this fridge. It is a MONSTER. But because I can do custom depth, I love it.

    No other place for cleaning supplies.

    Open....

    Drama!

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Friend saw fridge. Immediately started singing 2001 Space Odyssey theme.

    Yeah, it's that big!!!

  • schicksal
    4 years ago

    Dirty pulls can be dealt with, I would totally be finding somewhere to reuse them. But this is coming from someone who's had a build goal of anything new looking like it was part of the original 1959 build, and who removed something newer and recreated a blue/gray bathroom.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    They aren't dirty. The finish is worn through in a splotchy way!!!! I have to strip off the rest and then coat them in something again that will handle wear.

    I thought about redoing vintage "colored" bathrooms (replacing wasn't optional because of water damage), but all the floor grout was just way too much.

    Redoing a 42" counter depth fridge--probably sub zero--just isn't in the budget, either.

    Buttttt... I'll find a sneak peek at my cabinet doors!

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    These will be my bottom cabinet design. They will almost match the originals!

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Today, I cleaned off the porch and double checked the plan measurements. We haven't used the porch in years. We use the decks constantly, but you have to SCRUB the furniture on the porch several times a year to really use it, it doesn't have a good view, and it's often damp--and wasps just love it! So here is the poor, filthy, neglected thing before....

    And after, from the other end looking into the house. I never replaced this door because I knew it was going. All the sliders on the house are 8', not 6'.

    The stonework is gorgeous. Tons of mica. I tried to preserve it in my design, but that resulted in a total mess for lots of complicated reasons. It will be reused elsewhere on the property. The original color of the cedar siding on parts of the house is visible here

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I call this craftsman-influenced because I mentally divide these houses into the Jetsons-like futuristic modern and those that look to lots of natural materials--stone, cedar, and site-built windows. The second retains echoes of Arts and Crafts/Prairie/Craftsman, while the former looks to ultramodern designs of the future. I can't put a floating fireplace in my living room without it being very silly.

    Finished the step. (Took the pic before removing mortar.)

    The key dealing with cheap gauged slate is heavy back buttering to get the level consistent. Latex modified thinset rated for stone outdoors, of course.

    I learned the hard way NEVER to grout large tiles like the bag says, by spreading grout everywhere. I grout straight into the joints. I would never have gotten these slate tiles clean!!!

    Also, I don't actually wipe the joint itself except once when working with really dark grouts. Otherwise, you pull the color out. Who learned this the hard way long ago???? That's right! ME!!! Don't do that. Lol.

    This pic was before I cleaned my mess.

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    So, I am not surprised to report that my Samsung fridge was jostled at installation in such a way that it changes its own settlings. Apparently a common issue. I knew the risk of getting a more complicated fridge. Repairmen coming on Thursday.

    But it IS big enough for everything! This means I don't need a second fridge with the remodel, just a new freezer. I am not even putting in a drinks/refreshment fridge because we only drink water, milk, and tea except for the kid who commutes to college right now.

    I am waiting for a custom door order to come in for elsewhere in the house. In the meantime, I've done some casual demo work. I can't lift the cement blocks alone (they were precast but then cemented in place), and that's not something my husband does, sooooo I get to do the heavy lifting with my weekend guy, if we can swing it together. If not, then I will hire some muscle.

    Leg for scale:

  • Milly Rey
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    I also got a $50 credit for my old fridge. And I bought a 42" pry bar and a 10# sledgehammer. I need the prybar for other things, but I mostly bought it for this.

    Total expenses: $3048.38.