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Salvia patens tubers

frances_in_nj
November 1, 2017

I was wondering if anybody here has dug up and wintered over salvia patens tubers? I saw something online that suggested that you could do this, essentially treating them just like dahlia tubers. Was just wondering if anybody had experience with this? Thanks!

Comments (21)

  • Jean

    Yes, you can. I think I would bury it in barely moist potting mix.

    I'm in zone7; my plant survived winters in the ground.

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Frances - I just dug up my s. patens (Blue Angel) recently and stored them in perlite, as I had read the same thing about storing them like dahlias. I've never done it before. Want to meet back here in the spring and compare notes? I'm bookmarking this page.

    BTW, I didn't moisten the perlite, but I think I will check them later in the winter and see if they are shriveling too much, at which time, I may moisten the perlite slightly. I'm more concerned about rot than about the shriveling, though.

    Alex

  • frances_in_nj

    Hi Alex, well, being really impatient, I potted up one of my saved salvia patens tubers (I know its probably WAY too early, but I have a bunch of them so figure I can afford to experiment). I stored mine like I do my dahlias, in peat moss. I didn't dampen the peat, as I never do for my dahlias. None of them has seemed too shriveled. Anyway, I potted the one up 2 days ago, so we'll see what happens! I'll report back if/when it starts to sprout. (I'm wondering if it would like a little heat?)

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Frances - oh, goody! :) Yeah, you probably are way too early, but who cares?! Let me know what happens. I took a look and feel of mine a few days ago, and thought there was some evidence of shriveling. They're not so plump as the dahlias, after all - so I sprinkled a bit of water on them. I checked them yesterday and it seemed like they were a bit more firm. I'm hopeful that they're still alive. As to giving yours heat, I'd say hold off on it until you start seeing some action. Just a thought.

    Alex

  • bella rosa

    I dug up my two Black and Blue salvia tubers last year, potted them up in potting mix and put them in our unheated garage. Hopefully, they will come back. I'll report back.

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Hey Bella Rosa! Yes, let us know. I'm pretty sure mine are still alive, though still sitting in perlite. The other related news is that I gave cold treatment to 24 of the salvia patens seeds saved from last season's plants, putting them in damp paper toweling in a baggie in the fridge. After a month or so, I removed them and put the bag, as is, under my plant lights at room temperature. 23 germinated, at which point, I planted them in 6 pack cells and put them back under the lights, where they are now. That's a great improvement over the 3 out of 25 that I got when I planted the commercial seed under lights last year without the prior cold treatment. Just thought I'd let you guys know.

    Alex

  • bella rosa

    Hi Alex, 23 out of 24 is a pretty good germination rate! I'll keep you guys posted on the salvia tubers. I'll start watering them at the end of the month and see what happens. I did not water them at all. Wish me luck!

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Frances - though I was hoping to let them go longer, just to see what the storage length would be, my salvia patens tubers started to sprout (as have my 4 O'clocks and one of the dahlias.) So, yesterday they got planted. Still, I suppose you can say that the whole storage issue was a success. They were in storage for 4 months. Maybe they would have lasted longer if I hadn't gotten nervous about it. Definitely they were in a room that was a little too warm, which would have been a factor. Hope you're still seeing this and let us know how yours have fared. You too, bella rosa!

    Alex

  • jana (z7b, Philadelphia, PA)

    I had great success last year with digging up Black and Blue tubers and throwing them in a paper bag. I planted April 1 inside for a head start. Doing the same this year. Good luck, everyone!

  • Loretta NJ Z6

    Well I didn't know I could do this. Looking forward to seeing everyone's results.

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Quick update: I now have 4 salvia patens plants definitely putting out new growth under the lights with the rest of my seedlings - which is even more of a success considering I originally planted only 3 plants! Though I don't remember it, I must have divided one of them when I dug them up. So - yay! :) Plus I have over 2 dozen seedlings from the seeds gathered last fall. Hopefully they will - at least some of them - be that gorgeous true blue of the parents, which were Blue Angel. I never posted a photo of the parents. The color in the pic is accurate.

    Alex


  • bella rosa

    That's beautiful.

  • samhain10 - 5a

    It's a gorgeous blue - crossing my fingers that the babies will be blue, also. Have never grown salvia patens before, and the parents were a named variety, so I assume they were hybrid.


  • samhain10 - 5a

    UPDATE: Am pleased to report that the original tubers made the transition from pots to the garden just fine, as did the seedlings from the seed gathered from the parent plants last fall. The seedlings retain the beautiful blue of the parents. Bloom was much earlier since I started them under lights at least 3 weeks earlier than last year (following a month of cold stratification on the seeds). The only thing I'd maybe do differently is try not to panic if I see some little sprouts growing while the roots are in storage, and just see if I can hold off longer before potting them up, since light space in the spring is often at a premium. So-o-o many things to start! Here's a pic (6-10-18) of the blue salvia patens in one of the planter boxes with second generation hybrid marigolds Alumia Vanilla Cream (which, BTW, came out looking pretty much like their parents also. Those in the photo are not as representative of all the later blooms which are much more doubled - and very heavy bloomers!)

    Alex

  • Loretta NJ Z6

    That's a nice combination!

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Thanks, Loretta! :)

  • CA Kate z9

    Such a beautiful blue. I'm glad that you posted again to let us know how your experiment turned out.

  • Patti ~ Chicago Zone 5/6a

    I am wondering how everyone else who stored the tubers did as well. I just love the color too. It is so vibrant!!!

  • Loretta NJ Z6

    For some reason, I never get any of the "premium" salvia seeds to germinate including Black and Blue, Pineapple, etc. But saving the tubers is worth a try, especially since most of my salvias get white fly over the summer and aren't salvageable as plants.

  • samhain10 - 5a

    Loretta, I did have difficulty with the Blue Angel salvia patens that I purchased commercially. Only 3 out of 25 or so seeds germinated. That's why I decided to try cold stratification with their second generation seeds this spring. As stated, I only gave them a month of cold, might have been better if it was even longer. Germination was very good, though, possibly as a result. It was a simple matter of putting the seed in a folded, damp paper towel, and putting this in the refrigerator. Once I removed the seed from the fridge, I left it in the baggie and put the whole thing under the lights. I do this now with almost all seed except the tinies, such as petunia, lobelia and coleus which get direct-sowed onto the medium. As I see germination, I will move the seeds to the growing medium. Yes, it spreads the process out over a longer period, which wouldn't be feasible if you were working with very large amounts. But for me, it means I only plant what has germinated, thus assuring that I'm not wasting alot of medium or using up light space. I transplant to larger quarters when necessary, if needed before planting-out. Sorry about the whitefly. :)

    Alex

  • Loretta NJ Z6

    Thanks, I did try cold strat this year but will try again now that I know it is possible.

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