ethanwes

How to get Monstera stalk to resprout leaves?

ethanwes
3 years ago

Hi guys,

I’ve inherited a very old Monstera Deliciosa which is about 1.6m tall but only has 2 leaves. The ‘trunk’ is quite thick & self-supports fine, but I was hoping I’d be able to get it to sprout leaves lower down. My understanding is that if I were to take a cutting from the growing tip (where the 2 leaves are) it would sprout new growing tip/s, however the only visible node is an aerial root just below those 2 leaves. If I were to take such a cutting, it would leave this long stem with no leaves to photosynthesise. Would it still form a new growing tip/s? Or would the trunk just die? Part of the trunk is green, but much of it is grey-brown... would hate for this lovely old plant to just die!! But it looks so sad as is... would really appreciate any advice on how to get this thing back to its full glory!!

Cheers

Ethan

(PS probably worth adding I’m in Western Australia, so it’s our spring time right now)

Comments (68)

  • Eleanor
    3 months ago

    Hi! I’m sorry to come in on an old post - hopefully someone will see this. But! I left my monstera (one my dad gave me from the 80’s) with a friend as I transitioned between living situations and travel, long story short every single leaf was diseased by the time I got back. I cut off all the leaves and have attempted to propagate them in water, a few of them surprisingly getting tiny (maybe centimeter long) roots sprouting off of the aerials. Does this seem like it’ll continue to be successful without a leaf for energy, or should I transfer to soil early? Any tips or tricks? I would usually leave in water for months to grow strong roots, but this was a diseased plant, and when I chopped the pieces, the inside of the stem was dark, so I can’t imagine it has too much life to give. What do I do? Thank you! @russ1023

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago

    The black tissue inside stems in not a good sign, but I would leave in water if you're getting some white roots off the aerials. You can lose some of the stem as long as it doesn't reach the node. The stem doesn't need a leaf to grow from the node, the stem has enough energy within it.


    Someone posted that leafless stem cuttings cannot produce a plant from the node, but it's not true. To prove it, early in the summer I planted 3 leafless, single node stem pieces of yellow variegated Borsigiana and all produced plants. I never posted the time-lapse pics but can do so if anyone's interested.


    So as I understand what you're dealing with, you cut the leaves off the vine and then cut it into stem pieces with aerial roots attached. How many nodes are on each piece? Do all the stem pieces have black material visible at the cut?


    Some pics might help.



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  • brynn Meredith
    3 months ago

    That would be awesome to see a time lapse!


    Also, just so I am clear. If I were to cut off 2 leaves and a node to propagate, the original plant will continue to grow at that cutting point?


    Hope you're doing well Russ!! Thanks for any and all advice 💚

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago

    Brynn, yes the original plant will produce new growth from the first and often the second node below where you took the cutting. Growth will be fast and strong because of the established root system of the base plant.


    I assume you mentioned removing leaves from the cuttings because of disease or damage. Even though a stem without a leaf can grow a plant, it's better to have a leaf than not since it can provide more photosynthesis which means more energy. However, a stem with with only a small aerial root, or none at all, can't usually support a full leaf if it's propagated in a medium. If propagating in water, the leaf might be supported without wilting if it isn't too large.

    So, when using a medium I cut the leaf back to a smaller size, leaving the petiole with a 2 to 4 inch circle of leaf at the top, depending on the thickness and size of the stem. It helps to put the pot in a terrarium environment since humidity is much higher so cuts moisture demand from the leaf. An aquarium, large jar or even a plastic bag provides this environment. If the leaf still wilts, cut it and petiole off at the stem, it's too much of a demand for moisture.


    Here are the pics I took when I propagated the 3 yellow variegated Borsigiana cuttings. These cuttings each had a small half inch to one inch aerial root.


    Top pic was taken 22 May 2020.




    same pic, without the label.


    This pic was taken 6 June 2020, 2 weeks later. Growth is well established now.

    Pot is upside down from the top pics.


    I don't seem to have later pics on my computer, I'll try to post them from my phone in another posting.

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago

    Taken 17 June 2020.



    30 June 2020.


  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    22 August 2020


  • Eleanor
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    @Russ1023 (central Fla)

    Hi again! (pt. 1/3)

    So - to recap, I had left my plant with a friend while I traveled.

    This is her two years ago:



    A little bit of shredding from my cat, and as you can see in the middle, my learning period of how to care for her after receiving her from my dad. But overall, a happy baby.

    Here’s her after living with my friend:





    When I finally got her back I was so scared to lose her that I, in a panic, chopped off all of the leaves I presumed to be diseased (aka, all of them). Realizing soon after that they were her greatest chance to receive energy to fuel root growth, I was sickened that I had possibly just killed my plant whilst trying to save her.

    Then, what used to be a beautiful wonder of nature, passed down to me from my father, originally grown in the 80’s, and that was, at its highest point, 12 feet tall and growing up the ceiling … was now withered to this reality:



  • Eleanor
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    @Russ1023 (central Fla) (pt. 2/3)

    It completely broke my heart. Did I make the worst mistake ever? I took every segment from the stalk with an aerial root that I could in the hopes that one would survive.

    And then …

    less than two weeks later, I finally have hope:









    (the roots are definitely longer now than in the photos, but not long enough)

  • Eleanor
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    @Russ1023 (central Fla) (pt 3/3)

    She has 5-6 new growth babies. I am so insanely relieved. I took these pictures a few days ago and the roots have since grown more and the new growth, slowly, has too (though not every stalk with new growth has roots, and vice versa).

    And while I’m excited, I’m also worried - will she have enough energy to finish the roots in time to support the new growth?

    Is keeping her in water the best decision?

    I can tell the root growth is blissfully contagious between them; one segment I put in a separate jar to root (as this was where the top leaf had been, and so I figured the farthest away from the disease if had spread to the stem, and therefore my greatest hope at success), as to not potentially be contaminated by the others that had darker inside stems. Ironically, this was the least successful and showed the smallest amount of progress. However, just a few days ago I put her in with the others, realizing that something is definitely working there, and of course now she is finally growing her root and making progress. Supported by her siblings and their growth.

    What do you think I should do? Will the roots continue to grow with their limited supply of energy? I’m sure that's why the plant is working harder to put the energy into the new growth, so that she can photosynthesize for the roots … but I’m worried she’ll become stunted after there’s nothing left to give.

    Do you think she’ll make it in time for soil if I leave her in the water?

    And if she was successful, would her leaves be immature again, with little to no splits or holes?

    Thank you SO much for all of your help and sharing your success story.

    Here’s her today:







    Should I be worried about the browning tips?

    I look forward to hearing back from you!

    - Eleanor

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago


    Eleanor, you didn't necessarily make a mistake. By cutting every node separately you gave yourself many chances for success for a plant. Some would have left the multi-node stem intact which would be equally appropriate. I think the latter technique would be a safer way to go because a single node cutting is so small with two cut surfaces close together. If rot sets in from either cut, there's little room to cut it away and hope it doesn't return.


    I do see one of the cuttings had two nodes, both of which are breaking with new growth.


    So, I would stay with your propagation method, it looks like you're going to have many new plants to grow. You might also add a few drops of water soluble fertilizer to the propagating water, and change the water once in a while.

  • Eleanor
    3 months ago

    Hi there! Yes it’s in water. And a few of them have multiple, so I’m crossing my fingers! I change the water every few days. Any recommended fertilizer? Do you think that would boost the growth? Thank you!

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Hi Eleanor,

    I think you should keep them in water, stay with what you've been doing since it's working. You mentioned 'browning tips' in your prior mail, I don't see any browning on the roots in pics.

    Regarding fertilizer, it might give them a boost, worth a try.

    If you already have a fertilizer, just use it, anything will benefit. If you have to buy some, you might be able to find small bottles of already diluted fertilizer for house plants, that would be okay to use. Otherwise, look for one with 1st number higher than the other 2, or with all numbers the same. MIx as directed on the label and add 2 or 3 drops to your water. Let me know if you're not familiar with the numbers on fertilizers.

    Are you in a northern state? I'm more concerned with winter coming on than anything else, even indoor house plants know when it's winter and time to slow down. So be sure to keep the cuttings as warm as possible and give as much light as is available, short of full sun.

    If it was summer I'd suggest that you to transfer 1 or 2 cuttings to a soil mix or preferably long fiber sphagnum moss once they have a good root system. But given this time of year, especially if you're in the north, let them ride winter out in water. Philodendrons, monsteras, syngoniums and the like can stay in water indefinitely, just remember the water changing and fertilizer regimen.

    If you're not familiar with long fiber sphagnum moss, let me know.

    Keep us posted!!

  • Eleanor
    3 months ago

    That kind of moss is new to me! And yes I’m in northern Oregon. It’s definitely getting colder, and our heating (other than the fireplace) doesn’t work. Should I wrap it up in something or get a heat lamp / room heater? Suggestions? Thank you again, you’re the best!

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Wow, not good Eleanor, both your location and no central heat. Anything you can do to keep the cuttings warm will be essential, but I don't think wrapping them will be enough. They need a heat source. You can buy heat mats, they're made for germinating seeds and propagating but also to use for reptiles and the like in aquariums. Just Google 'Heat Mat'., you should be able to find one for under $10 and up. You just sit the container on it and it keeps it a steady temp. I don't know if they're all for use around water, but look for one that's waterproof in case the jar gets knocked over on it.

    I don't know if the stems and leaves will be okay with this setup... maybe. But if the house is really cold, you might have to invert a glass container over the whole thing, or put it in an aquarium with a top on it. The mat would heat that environment.

    If your fireplace is on all the time, you might get by with the plants being next to it, but would be hard to control too cold and too hot. You might also have a light problem.

    If you have friends with central heat, consider giving them a glass with a cutting in it as insurance, in case you lose yours. Just tell them to keep it on the kitchen windowsill and the water topped off. If this plant is super important to you and it looks like the cuttings are failing, consider mailing one or more to me and I'll take care of them until spring, then send them back. I've mailed plants all over the country for decades. Just don't wait until they're too far gone.

    My email address is bluesea14808@yahoo.com.

    Russ

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago

    Just out of curiosity Eleanor, what happened to the base plant you show in the pics you initially posted? The stump that was in the pot? Still have it? And how many cuttings from that big original plant do you still have, all in water?


    Russ

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    3 months ago

    Brynn Meredith, thank you for the 'likes'. I actually answered your last post days ago but had a problem with my phone and it never got submitted. Then I forgot that happened and picked up with Eleanor. Sorry.


    Anyway, yes, your base plant will produce new growth from the first and maybe second nodes below the cut. By now you probably have some growth, what has happened if anything??


    Russ

  • Lauren Brock
    2 months ago

    I have just read this entire thread and been so sad for you Eleanor and then hopeful and then so encouraged by Russ’s extreme generosity! Now I’m just waiting on the happy ending! Haha. I’m a very new monstera owner who got lucky with a grocery store $9.99 plant that is doing well despite my inexperience. Reading as much as I can to learn, realizing I may have tried to propagate too soon, as My cutting only has the tiniest bump of an aerial root and two leaves :/ I live in Texas and it’s just starting to get cooler here, I think my main plant doesn’t know it’s not summer anymore because I have a few leaves unfurling now that I’m very inpatient to see. Anyway, thanks to you all for all of the great info! Wishing you the best of luck! 🤞🏼🤞🏼🤞🏼

  • Eleanor
    2 months ago

    Hi Lauren!! Thank you SO MUCH 💚 I’m still nervous, I feel like I’m doing worse with this plant that any other because I care so much more about it, but we have lots of little new sprouts from the nodes. So crossing my fingers that they stick with me through the colder weather (it’s fall in Oregon here, so basically it’s winter weather to everyone else haha), but I’ve finally got my heat on and am cranking it up to try and keep my babies happy.

    Does your cutting have a node? Yes, longer and more aerial roots are preferable, but you can definitely make that tint root work if your other plants seem to be getting on just fine and sprouting new growth. Are you keeping it in water? Something I’ve found is that cuttings feed off of each other and grow faster together - so maybe if you have other cuttings, put them together in a water vessel for a while to encourage each other?

    Keep me posted on how it goes! And attach pictures if you have them!

  • Eleanor
    2 months ago

    Also hi again Russ! Sorry for the hiatus!

    I have the base plant which has sprouted a full new (immature) leaf, and another on the way.

    Also, I got my central heating working! So that much is great. However, while my plant is progressing, it’s very slow, and I’m wondering if it wouldn’t be better to just pot her up now. I have about seven cuttings all of the same plant, all in a container together in water.

    The roots are pretty spaced out on the aerial roots, definitely not full of them, and what’s there is anywhere from a centimeter to an inch long. Do you think it would harm the plant to pot her up early, or do you think she’d be most successful staying in water?

    Also, I may have already asked this, but are the new growths going to have backtracked into being fully immature again? They used to have many slits and some holes, and am wondering if I’m going to be right back into no slit heart shaped tiny leaves again. I don’t mind too much, as I’ll just be happy if even one lives, so the plant can live on!

    Thanks again!!

  • Eleanor
    2 months ago

    @russ1023 also! My boyfriends plant has yellow spots on the two new growth leaves - I’ve seen these spots before and the plant doesn’t seem unhealthy at all, so I was just wondering if you knew what they were. Here’s a pic!

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Eleanor, this could be a nutrient deficiency, possibly manganese. If he's not fertilizing, be sure to get one with micronutrients. Also, be careful of overwatering, only water when the top inch or so of soil is dry. I wouldn't use a full strength dose this time of year, go with 1/4 of recommended strength of a water soluble type fertilizer, preferably higher nitrogen which is first ratio number, or equal numbers such as 20-20-20, with minors.


    Not that it matters, but this doesn't look like a monstera, is it a philodendron?

  • Eleanor
    2 months ago

    It’s a philodendron! And he just got it from the nursery which is the confusing part!

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    2 months ago

    I can't tell which Philo it is from that pic, interesting it has these spots straight from the nursery. I would see what happens with a fertilizer, and water only when the top of the soil is dry.

  • Georgia Wetherall
    2 months ago

    Hello! I'm new to this forum, but I've had a monstera plant for the last 2 years. He is thriving, but possibly thriving too much! He's grown to 6 feet tall, and is just one really long stem. He's only growing vertically, and no matter how much I propagate him and prune him, he's just purely a vertical boy and isn't growing outwards like I how normally see monstera growing. He's gotten to the point now where I physically can't let him grow any taller, but I'm worried about cutting too much off and harming him or killing him, and even if I do cut it off it's just going to grow back to the same length! Any help would be appreciated. (He's grown about a foot and a half in two months!!)

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Georgia, monsteras typically don't branch to produce a bushy plant unless you intervene by cutting it. These are climbing plants in nature so they remain in a single-stem form and run across the ground in search of a tree. If it was much shorter you could simply take off the tip, but you will have to cut it closer to the base nearer the pot.


    There's no guarantee more than the last node on the base part of the stem will start growing, but very often 2 or sometimes 3 nodes will grow, which is the objective.

    Once the new vines have a few leaves you can cut those to hopefully produce a couple of branches on each of them, making a bushier plant.


    Cutting your plant won't kill or harm it, I would cut so that 3 or 4 leaves are left on the old vine. Let me know if you want instructions on how to propagate the top part that you cut off.


    I assume you have the dwarf form of M. deliciosa, the so-called Borsigiana form. If your plant is variegated, you probably know that the cuttings you can make from the top part of the vine are valuable. If it's all-green, not so much.

  • Sweet
    last month
    last modified: last month

    hi! i was wondering if anyobody could help me. because im so confused right now. i bought a monstera stem cutting with soil roots and 1 node from a seller. when i got the cutting i watered it and have put a dome over it for humidity. it's under a grow light as well. i told the seller what i have done and she told me to let it dry out for 2 weeks before watering. so i don't know if i made a mistake of watering it.

  • Dawn Anderson
    last month

    Help please!


    so I was given this from work, and I would like to know what your opinions are on what I should do with her?





    I am thinking that I am going to totally take off the leaves and propagate them into a few new plants but what about her base??? Is her base completely dead and non recoverable??


    Thank you in advance

  • Dawn Anderson
    last month

    Can’t seem to post pictures have tried twice

  • Dawn Anderson
    last month

    Hopefully this works

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month

    Hello everyone!! I have read this entire post and it gives me hope. My monstera LOVED my front porch but an unexpected cold snap got to it before I could get her inside. Now ALL the leaves look JUST AWFUL. I am not sure if I should cut all the leaves off, and try to cut the main stalk in segments.... or ride it out and just SEE if it will recover. Im in Louisiana and we typically dont get frost until October 31st... this one came early and got to my poor monstera. The main stalk seemed/seems healthy. I cant find any posts about "frost bitten Monstera" .... Ditch the leaves? Wait to see? Could I even expect new growth in the winter? Should I get her a heating mat to warm her up? Could this encourage new leaf growth? Any help is so appreciated.

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month

    Also, I should say that the leaves were initially light green and faded looking? And over the past 2 months continued to get more and more yellow, then brown. Its cold here (for us southerners) and my floors & near windows are definitely cool.

    Im trying to upload pictures...

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month


    Frost bite.

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month


    I think the stem looks pretty healthy... but the leaves that are yellow are beginning to turn yellow down the whole stem... Normal?

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month


    Stem. See some yellow and some green?

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month


    Poor baby...

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Looks like several people have posted with problems lately with no answers, I'll try to help individually but info might be similar in these cases.

    Sweet Gan, how has it turned out after 3 weeks? Your supplier didn't tell you correct info in saying to keep dry for 2 weeks, I hope you didn't follow that advice. Let me know what has happened.

    Dawn, you have an old plant there that does need some attention, what have you done in the last 3 weeks?

    If you haven't cut it yet, it's best to leave it alone until spring or early summer because propagation is iffy during the winter months. If you have cut it, keep the base and any cuttings warm and in decent light, and keep fingers crossed.

    You asked about the base. Since it has the big root system it will produce strong new growth if you cut the vines leaving 2 or 3 nodes. If you don't know about nodes, that's a little bump at the base of each leaf that will grow a new plant if the stem is cut above it. If the leaf is gone, the node is still there. Once cut this should be a bushier plant since you could get more than one node to grow from each stem.

    Your plant sorely needs repotting, but rather than going bigger and bigger with pots, if it were mine I would root-prune it and repot back into the same pot or one of a similar size. The simplest way is to unpot the plant, and with a big knife (carefully!) or even a hand saw, cut off a couple of inches all around the edge and bottom of the rootball. Then repot in a fresh soil mix similar to the original material. If you can scrub some of the soil mix off the cut edges of the rootball, that would be good. Do this in summer when it's growing strongly.

    Lacey, you must be in northern Louisiana to have had a freezing cold front. I spent 3 years in Shreveport decades ago when in the Air Force, great country but too cold for me. Your monstera will probably be okay as long as you don't see black areas forming on the stem. Probably not since it's been 2 months. Cut off all the yellow or yellowing leaves, they'll eventually fall off anyway. Leave the top leaf since it's still green. You could trim off some of the brown edges of that leaf if you don't like how it looks, don't try to cut out the interior spots.

    If you have a warmer spot for it with reasonable light, move it there. At this point having it warm is more important than higher light. Let it get through the winter for now. Your plant isnt too tall but if you want a bushier plant next summer, follow my notes for Dawn above. You can propagate the tip cutting in water or a light peat-based soil mix.

    More questions from anyone, no problem

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month

    Thank you so much Russ! Do I cut the stem at the base? Or just the leaves trimmed off the stems? Could it survive with no leaves, and just stems???

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lacey, no, don't cut the stem, just cut off the yellow leaves plus the petiole. The petiole is the stem that connects the leaf to the main stem. So you'll have a long main stem with the green leaf at the top. If the top leaf yellows completely, cut it off along with the petiole.

    Sure, the stem/plant will be fine it if loses all the leaves, the stem is green and can make energy from it's chlorophyll. It will start producing new leaves in the spring with coming of warm temps. If you want to shorten the plant in summer, cut the stem above the soil level leaving a couple of nodes. You might not see the little bumps that are nodes, but there's one where each leaf was attached. Just locate a couple of those old leaf scars on the stem and cut above them.

    Let me know if this isn't clear, or you have more questions. If you want to email directly, I'm at bluesea14808@yahoo.com.


  • Sweet
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Russ1023 (central Fla) hi! just an update.. it's starting to sprout (is that the right term?) all the existing roots that was there rotted. it was my fault because i made it too wet. i have changed the leca/ perlite / soil mix. cut the roots away. its still growing and im super excited. but, im afraid about the roots..


    crossing my fingers that it grows 😌

    question again though.. why is the tip brown?

  • Russ1023 (central Fla)
    last month

    It looks fine, just stay with what you're doing. I've never used leca so can't advise you on that. The little brown tip doesn't look too ominous and could be from several minor conditions, I wouldn't worry about it as long as it doesnt get a lot bigger.

  • Sweet
    last month

    thank you! 😁 will give an update soon.

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month

    Ohhhhh ok. I totally just googled "petiole" - I was calling THAT the stem. 🤦‍♀️🤷‍♀️ I see now. Thank you so much. Your information has been so helpful. Do you sell plants as well? Do you have a website @Russ1023 (central Fla) ??

  • Eleanor
    last month

    Lacey! Fully agree with Russ. When spring rolls around and the weather warms up, if you’re wanting a bushier plant you can propagate off of each node if you’d like. Just make sure you’re cutting so that each one has a node and root (the new leaf will sprout from the node, looking like a tiny light-green spike at first, and the aerial root will eventually turn into your entire root system for that segment). That’s what I’d do if I were you just to prevent it from being too lanky and top heavy, and it’s what I did with mine.

    Also update for Russ, every single one of my cuttings have full leaves, a few even have two already. So happy to bring my family plant back to the living!

  • Eleanor
    last month

    Here’s an easy reference for knowing what the main terms are if you aren’t already aware! Those roots are called aerial roots as they grow in the air, their purpose is to latch onto trees in the jungle essentially (you may have seen people using moss poles to mimic this) so that they don’t fall over, and so that broken ones can reroot in the soil. Everywhere that you had a leaf, you also have a node! I hope this is helpful! Also, I recommend watching a YouTube video of someone propagating monstera cuttings the first time so you can follow along. Send progress pictures if you can!

  • Lacey Dougherty
    last month

    Oh...em...gee....@Eleanor !!!!

    You did this in the WINTER?!?! CAN I DO THIS?!?! Or will it kill my baby?!?!

  • Eleanor
    last month

    I would definitely wait until spring to be safe, my plant had a bacterial infection on every leaf (I left it with a friend while traveling abroad, whoops) which is why I acted so fast with it when I got it back so it wouldn’t die. It’s definitely possible if you have a hot and humid home, but I’d say if it’s not urgent to wait until spring! :)

  • Sweet
    11 days ago

    @Russ1023 (central Fla) just an update.. she finally opened. it was supposed to be an albo borg but i don't know why it didn't have any white on it. just little spots. hopefully the 2nd leaf would have some variegration :) if not, it is going to be the most expensive monstera i have ever bought! :D


  • Sarah Lane
    8 days ago

    Hey all, Sarah here from little ol NZ!


    I am a novice houseplant, and got Myrtle from a garden centre about 8 months ago... she seems to be doing fine but looks a little sad atm...


    Its summer here and my house is hot... however I left a friend house/cat/plant sitting over the Christmas break and Myrtle looks a little worse for wear.


    Shes gone a little yellow/bronze in the leaves, although this hasnt spread down the petioles yet.




    She seems to only have one stem which is starting to look a little long... how have others managed to get so many stems?


    Lots of aerial roots tho, so many be ok?





    Am I worrying unnecessarily?


    Any advice to help improve Myrtles state of being?


    Thanks!

  • Eleanor
    7 days ago

    Hi Sarah! Monsteras only have one stem. Other people having multiple just have multiple plants in their pots!