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Growing Geranuims up Utility (Electricity/'Stobie') Pole in Australia

Haydn Yates
3 years ago

Hi all

I've found a photo of some flowers covering an unsightly utility (electricity, or 'stobie') pole, like the one out the front of my house. See below. I'm not sure what kind of flowers they've used, but I think they're Geraniums.

I'd like to replicate this project, so I've excavated (as deep as I dared) around the pole, and replaced the soil with a high quaity one full of nutrients. I've also wrapped a wire trelis around the pole, and finally, created a barrier (now staked and pegged) to prevent the neighbourhood dogs from watering my new flowers.


Can anyone think of the best type/breed of Geraniums to buy to replicate this project? Or possibly some other suitable flowers? I would very much like them to be white :)



Comments (7)

  • dowlinggram
    3 years ago

    Geraniums don't climb. but that could be a very large clump of Cranesbill Geraniums which would have taken years to get that large. It's hard to tell just what flowers they are because the photo is not a close up. It would be very hard to get something that climbs on a smooth pole because there is nothing for the tendrils to grab on to. You could plant a couple of dinner plate dahlias but you'd have to lift the tubers every year or some some annuals like the taller Zinnias or Lavetera but you'd have to plant them every year.

    Haydn Yates thanked dowlinggram
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    3 years ago

    In your climate, I'd guess that those are possibly pelargoniums rather than hardy geraniums/cranesbill. In areas where they are fully winter hardy, they will grow into a large, shrub-like mass.

    But rather than a shrub or perennial, I'd pick a vine to climb the power pole...perhaps a clematis. There are many different cultivars and hybrids with a range of bloom times and colors - I'm sure you can find something that suits your tastes :-))

    Note: it is important to remember that many plants that are grown as "annuals" in the US are really perennials in other areas of the world with mild winters. Like the dahlias (no need to dig), pelargoniums and lavatera....even some zinnias.

    Haydn Yates thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • dowlinggram
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    gardengal 48 Those flowers don't look like pelargonium flowers. Pelarargonium flowers are borne in clusters and they don't look big enough to be clusters. Clematis would need a trellis or chicken wire and would need something in front of it to shade the roots. I doubt it could grab onto a smooth pole and clematis likes it's feet in the shade and it;s top in the sun.

    My vote would be for Lavatera. It grows into a bushy plant about 3 feet tall in a season and is covered with lovely hollyhock like flowers. It is hardy and needs little care. It comes in annual or perennial cultivars. Those who are not familiar with the species are always asking me what that lovely flower is.

    Haydn Yates thanked dowlinggram
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    3 years ago

    dowlinggram, there are LOTS of different types of pellies. Ivy geranium, Pelargonium peltatum (which is what the photo plant looks like to me), does not have large flower clusters like the zonals do. Neither do the fancy leaf or scented types.

    And it is very simple to attach some sort of support system for the clematis :-) Or any other vining type plant that might be common in Australia. btw, the roots needing shade for clems is an old wives' tale.....they just need a cool, moist root run. That may occur with shade but it can be accomplished via other means as well.

    Haydn Yates thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • Haydn Yates
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Thankyou for the suggestions all. I might research some Clematis varieties I think. I've found some other examples in my neighbourhood on a walk the other night. (forgot to get a close up of the flowers though!) See below; the first one looks like Orange Jessamine, but I'm not sure about the other two. Such a great way to hide the poles though.

  • HU-556956825
    8 months ago

    hi mate, just wondering if you got any progress to show us. I am thinking of planting something to cover up those ugly pole

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