FOR PROS
Business tools custom-built for our industry

Say 'so long' to generic business software. Houzz Pro is designed for industry professionals like you.

kimberleetanner

type of flooring for a PNW home?

Kimberlee T
April 27, 2018
We are building a forever home in the PNW. I’ve done a lot of research and luxury vinyl appears to be the best option for us. We have lots of family that will visit, ocean beaches, and animals.
I’m really concerned about the fading aspect of the vinyl, and proper placement because I hear so much about the “creakiness” when people walk. My husband’s office just put in luxury vinyl where there’s a lot of traffic and he says everyone squeaks when they walk. I asked him if the floors shifted or what and he says that it’s the actual shoes causing the squeak.

Does anyone have any advice for a new home with lots of people and animal type flooring? I could really use some advice for type and color. I want a color that will go with anything. I plan on living in this home for more than 30years, then it will go to my children. I want the floors to be such that the kids could change the colors of everything and it would still look good on the flooring.
Thank you

Comments (13)

  • Alison
    We are building in North Vancouver so also PNW. We are doing vinyl in basement, engineered hardwood on main, carpet upstairs. I feel confident in our choices.
  • Kimberlee T
    Thank you for responding. My son owns a small cottage home in Vancouver. Nice area. What are “hardwood products “? Are they laminate? My daughter did laminate throughout the downstairs and carpet on the stairs and upstairs. Downstairs sounds like a clacking echoing room. Again, thanks for responding.
  • Kimberlee T
    I meant engineered hardwood
  • jn3344

    We have the glued down lvt's as opposed to the click planks. No squeeks. We did it in the master for allergies and animals. I like it.

    We have engineered on the main floor. Its holding up...2 years now. Puget Sound waterfront.

  • robin0919

    I agree with the engineered hardwood flooring. They hold up very well and allot less cost than hardwood flooring.


    https://www.bing.com/search?q=engineered+hardwood+flooring&qs=n&form=QBLH&sp=-1&ghc=2&pq=engineered&sc=8-10&sk=&cvid=FE311CAEFC324E2A830957A0BE7E89EE

  • Alison
    I think, and I’m sure someone will tell me if wrong, engineered hardwood is pieces of hardwood stuck together and finished off site and then installed ready to go on site vs real hardwood where pieces are brought in and put in on site and sanded and stained. We’ve had both types of hardwood in houses and neither clacked or made odd noises. I think getting it installed properly is key to success.
  • Alison
    Vinyl is a great option for the basement as it can get wet and is super strong. Our colour is a light oak.
  • SJ McCarthy

    The squeaking of vinyl can come from shoes. A snick of water on a pair of shoes (ahem...PNW = water) and you have a squeaky sound like a gymnasium during basket ball practice!

    A vinyl floor in sunlight can and will fade...or even discolour (old vinyl turned purple/black in hot areas). Your WINDOWS (ahem...the UV blocking potential that you paid extra money for) will dictate the likelihood of fading. With today's windows even the "entry level" Low-E windows come with 45% UV blocking. The midgrade will come with 70% UV block. The highest grade will come with 95-97% UV blocking (and plants will die with those types of windows).

    Even in the PNW (I'm in Vancouver), the intense sunlight during the summer months is enough to cause excess heat to build up on a vinyl floor (greater than 85 F). That is enough to ruin a vinyl floor. The window UV blocking will prevent this - assuming you use midgrade or better.

    So...my next question is "What grade of windows do you have?" How much direct sunlight will hit the floors during the summer months? If your roof has massive overhangs you won't need to worry - no sunlight will ever hit those floors. But in the PNW we tend to shy away from large overhangs. We are so desperate for natural light that we will have walls of windows that are south facing. And those types of presentations can be problematic with vinyl.

  • Kaillean (zone 8, Vancouver)

    We have the original 1947 hardwood floors in our house. I love them even though they are beat up and need refinishing. Nothing beats hardwood, IMO. We went practical and put vinyl in our basement. I hate the look and feel of them. In our last condo, we had prefinished hardwood which I also liked a lot but the finish does wear off the edges faster than finished in place.

    Hardwood stands up to almost anything and when wear shows you have the option to make them look new again.

  • Kimberlee T
    Thanks everyone. I truly appreciate your opinions and thoughts. I know we are going with the low e windows which is 45% uv. So, I’m thinking vinyl will be out. I read on another thread that Audura Max vinyls holds up in light, but I don’t know if it’s true. I too love hardwood floors, scuffed or not. Hardwood floors tell a story, to me, about all the living that went on in the home. I’m not sure about Engineered hardwood because the middle is plywood which warps in humidity and when seriously wet. I guess that’s true for anything that gets wet. Alison, thanks for the picture. I love the color of the floor. Thanks again for all of the responses, they really do help. I’d never have thought I’d be able to reach out and get so much valuable help with any given situation. Computers can be a marvelous tool.
  • Alison
    Engineered hardwood is extremely popular and common to be put in. My picture is actually of the wood not vinyl we chose. It’s very thick and strong. It’s not humid in the PNW and I wouldn’t want an obscene amount of water on any floor. Would anyone? We are having the hardwood in our kitchen and powder and I’m not worried about water at all.
  • bluesanne

    We are in a rural area northwest of Portland, have a very large Great Pyrenees and a small terrier, and we spend a great deal of time outdoors gardening and with our horses. We went with bamboo flooring, which is very hard and stands up well to dog nails and everything dogs and humans track inside. It also has enough variation in tone that any scratches that might occur would not be noticeable.

  • jsoph

    I too am researching flooring, and Im curious to know what you went with. Vinyl seems like a popular choice.

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268