FIND PROFESSIONALS
SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
r64obin

Clearance between gas stove top and microwave above

r64obin
8 years ago
Since we are plumbed for gas, we are putting in a new gas top. I say there isn't enough space between stove top and microwave, but husband says its fine. How much distance really needed.

Comments (58)

  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    Time and time again there are real plumbers and electricians on here telling you that a vent is not necessarily required and yet you people keep claiming it is.
  • J Corn
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    I think microwaves look more custom and built-in when the bottom is no lower than the cabinet bottoms. Maybe it is just the camera angle but the microwave looks significantly lower than the cabinets. Can you change that - at this point?

    We have a microwave above our stove and had to follow strict requirements to meet code and we followed the product insert guidelines for both our top and microwave. It has been a pain to keep the bottom of the microwave clean. Grease from pans or tomato sauce does splatter sometimes.

    But it certainly saves space to have it there!
  • Related Discussions

    how many inches clearance do you need above a stove and a microwave?

    Q

    Comments (4)
    Here is the International Residential Code. M1901.1 Clearances. Freestanding or built-in ranges shall have a vertical clearance above the cooking top of not less than 30 inches (762 mm) to unprotected combustible material. Reduced clearances are permitted in accordance with the listing and labeling of the range hoods or appliances. The installation of a listed and labeled cooking appliance or microwave oven over a listed and labeled cooking appliance shall be in accordance with Section M1504.1. M1504.1 Installation of a microwave oven over a cooking appliance. The installation of a listed and labeled cooking appliance or microwave oven over a listed and labeled cooking appliance shall conform to the terms of the upper appliance’s listing and label and the manufacturer’s installation instructions. The microwave oven shall conform to UL 923. http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2012/icod_irc_2012_19_sec001.htm
    ...See More

    want to remove microwave above the stove and install range hood

    Q

    Comments (4)
    They have vent-less hoods, which use charcoal or aluminum filters... It will stop cooking particles but will blow warm air back into the room. The difference between the two, charcoal filter does a better job at removing oils and cooking odors and they have to be constantly replaced. Aluminum filters not that good at filtering oils and odors that well but you can re-use them and clean them with soap and water.
    ...See More

    Gas stove top or induction?

    Q

    Comments (4)
    Out of the two I prefer induction. I have a gas-phobia though. You most likely do not need to buy ALL new pots, but yes, some do not work. Definitely consider checking what pots you have before deciding, and factor that into the cost.
    ...See More

    How far does a microwave need to be above a gas cooktop stove?

    Q

    Comments (4)
    You should look up and print the FULL set (not the abbreviated version) of the installation specifications for both the gas cooktop and the OTR microwave. Read the whole thing very carefully and they will tell you what you can/can't do. In the U.S. most code requirements are that you must follow the manufacturer's specifications and use the products only in compliance with the manufacturer's instructions. I agree with Cynthia, regardless of what the specs say, I would never use an OTR microwave with a gas appliance. We have removed them where they have been melted on the bottom. In addition, the CFMs are not enough to actually do anything.
    ...See More
  • feeny
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    What on earth is your problem, Fred? Yes, the Wolf specs say 30" to 36" clearance if there is a ventilation hood, and 42" clearance from combustible materials if there isn't. And all people here have said is that in the areas where they live, ventilation is required by code. This point has been confirmed in numerous other discussions by professionals on Houzz, and Ironwood Builders has written veritable tomes on the subject in prior discussions. The point is that r64obin will need to check the code in her state or municipality as well as the specs on the specific range or stovetop she is installing.

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/hood-fan-dsvw-vd~457052
    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/exhaust-hood-dsvw-vd~366833
    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/venting-my-kitchen-dsvw-vd~366789
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    Ironwood builders does not site a code. He quotes a bathroom regulation rather badly. Last I heard the kitchen is not in the bathroom. A window is in fact still considered a ventilation system according to the IRC. Refer me to the exact code.
  • feeny
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Did you actually read through the discussions on all three links? They are all about kitchen ventilation requirements over stovetops and ranges. Only one involved a window in the equation. So take it up with Ironwood and the other professionals on Houzz who were agreeing with him in those discussions if you have a bone to pick over this issue.
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    By code, Ventilation can in fact be accomplished through a central air conditioning system. Yes, I mean the type that keeps your house cool in the summer. I cannot help it if neither you nor ironwood know how to read the code. Did you read all three links? Not one of them actually sites a code. It doesn't exist. You have to read the WHOLE CODE book to understand it. I have.
  • creeser
    8 years ago
    Now I don't know what state you live in, but this may give you some basic insight. Call the planning department for your town and they can tell you what they require.

    California State Code

    California building codes specify that any range hood, including microwaves, installed above the stove must be a minimum of 24 inches away from the surface of the stove top if the hood is made of a noncombustible material. If the range hood or microwave is combustible, it must be installed a minimum of 30 inches away from the surface of the stove top. There are no codes pertaining to the width or overall size of the microwave, as there are with standard range hoods.

    California Municipal Codes

    While the state of California does have a building code for range hoods, this is superseded by the town you live in. This means that if you live in a California municipality that has more strict building codes than the state, you must follow the city's codes rather than the state code. Santa Monica, for example, makes no differential for combustible and noncombustible range hoods; all range hoods are to be installed at 30 inches above the surface of the stove top. If you are being inspected by the city you live in, check with your city hall to get your local building codes.
  • feeny
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Well, Fred, you were the one who insisted upon using the judgment of the professionals on Houzz as authorities on this issue, and now that I've shown how they have weighed in on the subject in the past, you refuse to accept the very authorities you requested commenters to listen to, and insist that you are the only one to have read the codes cover to cover. Interesting.
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    @ Feeny, you can't even seem to read this thread correctly. I insist on someone showing me the actual code. Not someone 's opinion on what they think they read. I am in constant contact with the building department. I am a professional.
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    @ creeser . If you read my comments I said that the microwave probably won't meet any code. The issue is the ventilation aspect. Ventilation in no way has to be a direct vent hood to the outdoors. It is only one method of achieving code compliance.
  • feeny
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Excuse me, but i am perfectly capable of reading what you have written. You said: "Time and time again there are real plumbers and electricians on here telling you that a vent is not necessarily required and yet you people keep claiming it is." I merely showed you that, in fact, "time and time again" professionals on Houzz had insisted that ventilation was, in fact, required, thereby giving exactly the same advice we were offering. You had questioned the basis of various posters claims, and I showed you that basis in exactly the form you had requested (the authority of "real plumbers and electricians"). Are you right or are all the rest of the Houzz professionals right? I don't know. But I do know ventilation was required in my own municipality in Ohio when we renovated our kitchen, and that external ventilation was the recommended form for a professional gas range. Since this corresponds with Ironwood's advice, I'm inclined to believe Ironwood and the other Houzz professionals who have weighed in on this question. If you wish to have a spat with them about who can read code better, I suggest you take it to the professionals section of Houzz rather than spewing intemperately at other posters in r64obin's discussion thread.
  • creeser
    8 years ago
    Fred, excuse me, but I was answering r64obin's question. This is her post, not your personal diatribe.
  • mefor
    8 years ago
    Dang!!'
  • Nancy Walton
    8 years ago
    I was repeating what was told to me by a professional in my municipality. He refused to install the hood because I had lowered it to accomodate a handicapped tenant.
  • judianna20
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    17" is the distance between my gas stove top and the microwave. My stove is on an inside wall, microwave has a rather useless vent, stove has a down draft. All Jenn-Aire, new construction 2007.

    I question the 30". Isn't that too high?
  • judianna20
    8 years ago
    Fred, stop it. No one is listening anymore to your suggestions because we are so put off by your manner that it no longer matters what you have to say. Ignorance comes wrapped in a lot of different packages.
  • judianna20
    8 years ago
    r64robin, a new gas installation will require an inspection. That may settle all of your and your husband's concerns.
  • Jayme H.
    8 years ago
    Lighten up Fred
  • PRO
    sstarr93
    8 years ago
    I think you would enjoy cooking more (I know I would) if you take that microwave out.
  • Nancy Walton
    8 years ago
    I think Fred has vacated the room, actually.
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    Here is how you site a code. Read the exception carefully. A window or a properly installed whole house air conditioning system is considered mechanical or natural ventilation. http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2012/icod_irc_2012_15_sec003.htm
  • PRO
    sstarr93
    8 years ago
    cite
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    :-)
  • Nancy Walton
    8 years ago
    Fred, I think all who posted about "codes," including myself, were emphasising checking on local codes for the area, not necessarily insisting that their way was "right," so what would be the purpose to cite code that was not applicable?
  • Nancy Walton
    8 years ago
    Mforr, yes--it is always the strictest code that applies.
  • PRO
    sstarr93
    8 years ago
    Do you mean this exception?
    ..."Exception: Where installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions, and where mechanical or natural ventilation is otherwise provided, listed and labeled ductless range hoods shall not be required to discharge to the outdoors."

    If that's the one you mean, I think it's a stretch to interpret it as meaning AC systems.
  • Jayme H.
    8 years ago
    John Wayne Gacy also had a smiley face
  • Fred S
    8 years ago
    Correct, you can attach a fresh air system to a central air and have it sized properly instead of a vented exhaust hood.
  • evierh
    8 years ago
    @Fred S - Your profile doesn't say anything about you, so it's possible that you're a contracting professional .. but your tone is incredibly rude & dismissive of other posters. There are ways to disagree, and even to say that someone may be incorrect, without calling everyone "ignorant" or telling them they can't read! If you are a professional, I can't imagine what it would be like to work with you.
  • PRO
    Linda
    8 years ago
    Just because someone makes their living in the building industry, does not necessarily make them a professional
  • mrep75
    8 years ago
    Not sure what the reg'a over in the states are! but here in the UK generally you will find all minimum clearance's to combustible materials within the manufactures instruction's for the appliance(gas job)and purpose provided ventilation is not required, providing the room is over 5 cubic meters and has an openable door or window. A cooker hood is not required as part of the installation but would recommend to remove cooking odours..
  • PRO
    Maker Interiors
    8 years ago
    30" above any cooktop min.
  • PRO
    Maker Interiors
    8 years ago
    That was the original question right?
  • Richard Nuesch
    8 years ago
    For cooking and the fan it is great to have at least 24", But for taking out hot liquids out of the microwave it is saver and easier when it is much lower. In my opinion, 16-22" is the best compromise.
    The Min. 30" many comments mention here is in installations manuals between top of cook-stove and TOP of microwave. That leaves only 14" Min. between cook surface and microwave as minimum.
  • PRO
    Blue Bridge Cabinetry and Design
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago
    Evolution...Yeah. Although many MICROWAVE HOOD FAN manufacturers have it specified that the bottom of the microwave should be no less than 16" above the cooktop. That's still way too low in my opinion. ESPECIALLY over a gas stove. (I could see TECHNICALLY doing that over an induction cooktop, but still I'd never do it).
    Most GAS COOKTOP installation manuals specify a 30" minimum clearance to any on-combustible (i.e. hoodfan) object directly above the cooktop. I always go with following the most cautious guideline (so do most insurance companies). I've never put a microwave hoodfan over a gas cooktop. Respect the flame.
  • tstock05
    6 years ago

    So from all this discussion, I took a few items to think about :

    - Microwave hood vents have to be high enough not to burst into flames. (24", 30", etc)

    - Microwaves have to be low enough for safe access and due to danger of hot items overhead (66" to top of microwave from floor, leaving 18" gap or less)

    - Microwave Installation sheet should be consulted (otherwise vent won't be effective)

    - stovetop installation sheet should be consulted

    - Local codes rule, but can be misinterpreted because of conflicting information and personal bias, as you see in this forum. Good professionals can come to different opinions.

    - Clearly, "as high as possible" is not universal good advice, due to hot liquids overhead, hood venting performance, and ease and safe accessibility.

    - Clearly, some code and stove installation instructions mention non-combustible materials higher up the top of stove than microwave hood installation requires for safe and effective operation of said microwave. The answer to what do you do when gap has to be more than 24" and less than 18" is still a mystery. I propose you get rid of microwave (replace with over counter or under mounted but not a hoodvent model) I'm not investigating lowering stovetop :-)


  • easternhomebuilder
    5 years ago

    So, I find myself wanting to do the exact same thing as R64obin and my set up (3-" microwave over 36" electric cooktop with 20" clearance) looks identical. I have spent two days now chasing "the code" to determine if the clearance is acceptable. The Gas company, the appliance company, and the town building dept all say 'go ask the other guys'. Wife found a GE web page that pegs the clearance to their microwaves at 16", but ours is a Maytag microwave (and a Frigidaire cooktop). I am ready to toss the project into the garbage. I may invite them all to lunch and say "work it out'. While it may not make a difference, I've narrowed the cooktop down to Wolf and JennAir,36" 5-burner models. I don't want to yank the microwave for a vent hood. No place else for it. (Could replace one of the ovens with a microwave/convection/oven but we like the ovens as they are and they've worked fine. Oh. And the dishwasher died yesterday, a little over 8 years since we moved in. Timed Obsolescence at it's worst. Building a house is infinitely easier than remodeling, or even replacing an appliance.

  • Fred S
    5 years ago

  • jeanc47
    5 years ago

    Don't give up Fred, you do sound a little cranky though. I must say I looked on this site for answers to my OTR-SAMSUNG new microwave 400 cfm model #ME18H704SFS for installation over a new Samsung# NX58H5600SS gas range. Just as I thought, as much confusion as I am experiencing. Some say 30", my carpenter says 17", gas guy says 30"...but it could be lower. I was going to look up code in Avery County, NC but I think it's going to be a waste of time after reading a previous poster. I will quote what the manual says for the microwave under the Mounting Space section....."IF (my capitalization) you are going to vent your microwave oven to the outside, see the Hood Exhaust Section for exhaust duct preparation. Then....The dimensions provided are the minimum required for mounting the microwave oven. Local codes and the practical use of the range will likely require you to provide more than the 13.5" shown between the range and the bottom of the microwave. So even the manual is waffling. I would also ask the question what is combustible and non-combustible. The underside of this microwave is not all metal, and everything has plastic these days, so it must be considered combustible I would imagine. If it was mounted 30" up I would have to have a little step ladder to reach it. Please advise?? P.S. I am planning to vent the OTR outside.

  • Fred S
    5 years ago

    The NC code seems to have simplified language, but probably not less confusing judging by your question.

    http://codes.iccsafe.org/app/book/content/PDF/2012/North_Carolina/Residential/Part_V_Mechanical/PDFs/09_NC_Mech_2012.pdf

    .

    http://codes.iccsafe.org/app/book/toc/2012/North_Carolina/Residential/All_Parts/index.html

    .

    "I would also ask the question what is combustible and non-combustible. The underside of this microwave is not all metal, and everything has plastic these days, so it must be considered combustible I would imagine."

    The question should be what is combustible (Like wood cabinets, or wood hood surrounds), and what is not non-combustible, but is a "listed and labeled" appliance. Many appliances have fans that turn on when the combustible parts start to get too hot.

    "Some say 30", my carpenter says 17", gas guy says 30"...but it could be lower...If it was mounted 30" up I would have to have a little step ladder to reach it."

    They seem to be confusing measurements. 30" above the cooktop is to the TOP of the microwave. 13.5"-17" is to the bottom, and depends on the microwave, and UL testing. The test procedure for UL 923 is based on 30" from the top of the cooktop to the TOP of the microwave, regardless of how tall the microwave is. Therefore, the measurement to the bottom of the microwave can change depending on the brand and style of the microwave.

    .

  • PRO
    Murphy's Design
    5 years ago
    Wow, lots of codes getting quoted here. It's actually a simple process. First check both the microwave specification and the cooktop. The cooktop spec will give you the required CFM rating. They will also make a recommendation for height for best performance. Recirculating ventilation or vented to the exterior is most usually acceptable for basic appliances . High BTU or commercial grade appliances have additional considerations. The microwave or hood will give you the height to hang appliance as well. Most over the range microwaves are made as non combustible as you cannot mount it over the cooktop with a 30" clearance without creating an issue with safety based on height of microwave. (Recommended at 56" off floor with consideration to users height at shoulder) the appliance industry knows this and is used to complying.
    Most local jurisdictions will defer to your appliance specification .
  • PRO
    Victory Range Hoods
    5 years ago

    Hello r64obin ,


    I would suggest to refer to the manual of your stove. Usually in the manual is specified for minimum distance from the top of the stove to the bottom of the range hood. Usually gas stoves require more powerful range hoods , but also there is the chance of you needing a Makeup Air system .
    Carbon monoxide should not be underestimated as it is very dangerous. Our experience shows that the Microwave combos are not a very good choice when it comes to using gas stoves. Which is the reason why people change it, when they purchase gas stove. Before you proceed with removing the microwave combo , I would suggest to find out what is the type and size of the duct that is installed currently , and where is it located . Then you should check the distance from the top of the stove to the bottom of the cabinet to make sure you have enough space , to install independent under cabinet range hood. Please if there is anything we could help you with , visit our website www.KitchenHoods.ca




  • jeanc47
    5 years ago

    Interesting, I see no CFM recommendations on the Samsung Range described in earlier post and the new venting has 6 to 6.5" pipe with only one turn. Many say the correct venting installation is just as important as the CFM number in this case 400. That number was the same as a hood only brand I looked at as well. Does the actual code from NC look helpful, it seems not in my humble opinion. Well for all asking questions about this I have an 18" clearance, approx. (range not delivered yet) and will call the gas company tomorrow to see if they will install the gas range after looking at the specs from the Samsung Range which read as follows..." 30" minimum clearance between the top of the cooking surface and the bottom of an unprotected wood or metal cabinet (does that mean a new OTR); or 24" minimum when the bottom of the wood or metal cabinet is protected by not less than 1/4"flame retardant mill board covered with not less than no. 28 MSG sheet steel, 0.015" stainless steel, 0.024" aluminum or 0.020 copper. Huh? Good luck!

  • PRO
    ReMax - Lisa
    5 years ago
    I don't care about quoting the applicable code, I care about safety! An OTR range over a gas range is simply not safe. Just turn the back burner on high and hold your hand above it. You will have to move your hand quite quickly, even if held 20-30" above. Why take a chance and really, who uses a microwave to cook much anymore anyway? They ruin the taste of most leftovers:)
  • Fred S
    5 years ago

  • km kane
    5 years ago
    Um, that is not fine. At all! Fire hazard for sure. Check your insurance
  • km kane
    5 years ago
    And ReMax Lisa makes the best comment of all. No matter how much Fred S insists that code is king (or not, or whatever the heck he ALWAYS argues about while calling us ignorant), just "turn the back burner on and hold you hand above it" at the microwave level. Chances are, you'll get burned, which means so will your cabinets
  • Nancy Walton
    5 years ago

    Most microwaves (over-the-range) do not rely on sitting on a wooden shelf. They have a metal bottom, which, by definition, are non-combustible. However, that being said, my municipality does not allow less than 30" over a gas stove unless it is vented to the outside. Electric stoves are no problem.

  • michelleknaub
    4 years ago

    Q

  • Stax
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    " By code, Ventilation can in fact be accomplished through a central air conditioning system."

    Is this is the reason more and more builders are putting the bathroom exhaust fan in the hall linen closet.