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pegging esp. reines des violettes rose

mary_rockland
August 21, 2018
last modified: August 21, 2018

Hi,

I think pegging might be a solution on how to handle my Reines des Violettes rose and increase flower production. Does anyone have photos or advise on how this has worked for them?

Comments (10)

  • dianela7bnorthal

    I do not have this rose, but I can tell you that pegging does work to increase bloom. I have several roses that have super weird relaxed canes and pegging them always make them bloom all along the canes. Let’s see what other who may have this particular variety say, but I think pegging her would be a great idea.

    This one bloomed only at the tips before I decided to try pegging it to the ground.

    My Roses and clematis 2018 · More Info

    First flush after pegging

    My Roses and clematis 2018 · More Info

    mary_rockland thanked dianela7bnorthal
  • mary_rockland

    Looks like good results. Sorry, I can't see very well from the photo. How do you physically peg yours? Is it weighted down with rocks or do you make "hairpins" out of wires or how does it work? Does the weight of the branches just bend well enough on it's own? Do you bring the growing ends all the way to the base of the rose or how far out from the base do you peg them? Have you experimented with pegging it different ways for different effects? I notice that this one is almost a "standard" the way all the branches seem to start at the same height from a central trunk. Do you have other roses pegged that do not have a central trunk. Sorry for all the questions, just very curious.

  • AquaEyes 7a NJ

    I find that pegging works better when canes are no lower than horizontal from the origination point. Sure, you'll get blooms during the first flush like in the pic above, but after that, the stems that are lower than the cane's origination point will start dying back to where the stems are at or above the cane's origination point. So I prefer to use some pieces of tree branches, or bamboo stakes, stuck into the ground, and tying canes to them so that they're just higher than the origination point on the cane. This usually means at least six inches above the mulch line, often higher. You get the same effect, but without the post-bloom die-back at the tips that happens when you peg the ends to the ground. If you're worried about how the stakes would look, mine disappear among the companion perennials -- the tree branches, especially, just blend into the background.

    For whatever reason, roses with Rambler ancestry don't seem to suffer the "lower tips die-back", and seeing how Ramblers and their species ancestors often have canes spilling down out of trees tells me it's something inherent to them. But things like Bourbons and Hybrid Perpetuals don't have this ancestry -- their ancestral species grow up and lean outward at the tips.

    Personally, I grow 'Reine des Violettes' as a short climber, sort of espaliered against a raised deck railing. But in your colder zone, pegging low might be a better bet, since the rose would benefit from snow-cover in Winter.

    :-)

    ~Christopher

  • bart_2015

    My experience confirms what Christopher writes, about the tip-die-back thing.Rd V also works well spiralled up on a tripod.

  • jacqueline9CA

    I tried this a couple of times, and it certainly worked for one season. However, keeping it maintained was a total pain, and also some of my roses ROOTED where they were pegged onto the ground, and made more rose plants, which was nice (I remembered that for when I want to propagate a rose), but then I ended up with 5-6 roses, instead of one to deal with. So, I never do that anymore (except with one cane if I am trying to get a rose to root). I do tie rose canes horizontally - on the house & garage, on fences, onto nearby rose supports, and that works great. I am just not willing to spend a lot of time maintaining perfect roses - if mine get the dead wood removed every so often, and a handful of food, and mulch once a season, they are happy.

    Jackie

  • mary_rockland

    My hope is primarily to get mine to bloom this way., but it's good to know the positive and negative.

  • AquaEyes 7a NJ

    Note that my "negative" is only if you peg down to the ground. So long as the tips are even just a few inches higher than the origination point on the cane, this won't be an issue.

    I've been having issues posting pics, or else I could just show you what I did with 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau'.

    :-/

    ~Christopher

    mary_rockland thanked AquaEyes 7a NJ
  • dianela7bnorthal

    Hello :),

    sorry it took me a while to get back in here. It is true that if you go to the ground with it the tips will some times die back. I have mine pegged with garden staples from amazon. The rebloom has not been an issue in any way however. The areas just above ground continue to be green and bloom all along the stem. I also have pegged some on itself, just bed the canes until you can hook it with itself ( usually using its own thorns).

    This is my dark desire. It was growing very tall and covering Desdemona so I pegged it on itself. You can see all the lateral sticking up and blooming. Sorry I do t have a pict before it got its leaves.

    My Roses and clematis 2018 · More Info

    This is some unknown climber. My tree gives it too much shade so instead of making it climb through it I have started pegging it down on itself. This may work better for very thorny varieties like this one.

    My Roses and clematis 2018 · More Info
    sorry I just realized I do t have a decent picture of how well it blooms all over. I pretty much pegg any rose that starts throwing up very long canes.
    My Roses and clematis 2018 · More Info

    I hope Christopher is able to post pictures some time. I would like to see what he did with his rose.

  • mary_rockland

    Christopher, yes I'd love some photos when you can. You seem to have a lot of experience with this and if you can help me make this mature old darling of mine bloom more than 5 blooms for the whole gardening season I'll be thrilled. No other rose I've ever had poses me such bloomin' ;) issues no matter how carefully I nurture her. She seems so happy to just grow nothing but leaves and ramrod straight and tall. I did watch the Paul Zimmerman video on pegging roses and it was inspiring. Just to clarify. I'm a bit confused about the "origination point". By "origination point on the cane" do you mean where the cane starts to arc or bend over? Is it where it starts to say bend at a 45% angle maybe?

  • AquaEyes 7a NJ

    OK, so if the cane is coming from the ground, the "origination point" would be the ground. If the cane is instead coming from another cane, where they meet is the "origination point". You can train the cane to arch up and then come down, or stretch outward to near-horizontal, but any point of the "down" that's lower than where the cane starts will start to die back after the first flush. So, even if the incline is very gradual, you want the tip of the pegged cane to be a little higher than where the cane started -- even if just a few inches.

    :-)

    ~Christopher

    mary_rockland thanked AquaEyes 7a NJ

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