jay6a

Want seeds for Asclepias, lanuginosa, quadrifolia, amplexicaulis.

Jay 6a Chicago
October 22, 2018
last modified: October 25, 2018

I'm trying to grow all the milkweeds that are native to my area. I still need these 4 species to complete the list. A. lanuginosa, A. quadrifolia, A. amplexicaulis, and A. longifolia. I have several different species of milkweed seeds to trade with, including a couple rare ones, and I have seeds of many natives to trade also.

Comments (23)

  • tomatofool

    Cabt find your seed

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked tomatofool
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    No, tomatofool. They are very rare and it's impossible to find seeds for them now. There are a lot of rare milkweeds besides the ones I have listed. 2 of the species I have listed will most likely be available as plants in spring. I'm actually looking for many other milkweeds too, it's just that the ones I have listed are native to my area and should be growing here. I've put posts on other forums also with the small hope that someone somewhere may be growing them or have access to them. And every few days I scroll through a bunch of milkweed adds hoping I might be surprised with something good. Didn't you just contact me about the free seeds I was offering on the seed exchange? You never got back to me. If you still want some you can talk to me about it here. The private messaging is too complicated. I just got done filling a package for somebody else, so if you still want seeds get back to me here. You don't happen to have a lead in any of these rare milkweeds, do you lol.

    Jay

  • tomatofool

    No leads sorry : (.

    What seeds u offering??

    Im new to gardening. what kinds of seeds did u wanna get rid of?

    Id like veggies seeds and cool looking flowers : )

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked tomatofool
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    No veggies left. Some herbs, chives, dill,fennel,anise, basil. Flowers, mexican hats, black eyed susans, verbenas, asters, basketflowers, penstemon, golderods, Lobelias, Daisies, a lot of perennials in the sunflower family, the bean family, the Verbena family. A lot of native plants and butterfly host plants. Baptisia, cowpen daisies, ect. What are your favorite plants? Get back to me. Jay

  • tomatofool

    I like mammoth edible sunflowers and the foxgloves and the coral bells. Umm i dont know the names of the flowers and tryed searching on google. But google doesnt know what im talking about. Do u have any tulips peonys or dahlias? Also lilys

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked tomatofool
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Tomatofool, did you get my package?

  • tomatofool

    Yes i got it! Very happyhappy! So many dofferent kinds of seeds the lupines look interesting and i really am stoked to trytry to grow these next year hoping many hummingbirds show up to enjoy them too. So many seeds thank you very much. Im gonna have the coolest flowers ever.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked tomatofool
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Great, good luck! I had to give you the tomato seeds lol.

  • tomatofool

    Thank you good sir. Do u remember who or where you got them from? They are unmarked . i will be growing them anyway just wanted to try to track down the name:) thank you again. The digitails are also super cool

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked tomatofool
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    The seeds came from all sorts of different places.

  • Dan Carter

    Jay, I too have been looking for these milkweeds, but A. amplexicaulis in particular, since I live in a sandy area in SE Wisconsin. If you had any luck, I'd be interested to hear. I was very pleased that Prairie Moon had A. ovalifolia available this year.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Dan Carter
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Hi Dan, great to hear from you. I was also quite pleased that Prairie Moon had the ovalifolia seeds. I have had no luck finding seeds for the amplexicaulis or quadrifolia. There are a couple nurseries that have had these plants in the past, but I'm not sure they are still carrying them. Pine Ridge nursery for the Amlpexicaulis, but they aren't selling it with there current offerings and Izel Plants has had quadrifolia plants in the past but not offering it now. I know, it's awefully frustrating that these milkweeds that should be growing in our areas are so hard to come by. I'm hoping my persistence pays off over time. If I get any new leads I'll let you in because it sounds to me like you want these 2 species just as much as I do. Good luck with your search. Sometimes I look at bonap and wonder exactly which counties might have the plant I'm looking for. There's a lot of counties between here and southern Wisconsin. I have several posts begging and pleading for these milkweeds scattered over various forums lol. A lot of fishing lines. I'm growing a few new milkweeds that are also natives for me so they should be keeping me busy, but I'll always be keeping the 4 species I don't have, at the back of my mind. The most common milkweed that's everywhere here is syriaca. Do you grow any Asclepias variegata, exaltata, or purpurea?

    Jay

  • Dan Carter

    Jay, I planted two A. variegata last summer, and I suppose I'll find out how they did through the winter (from mailordernatives in Florida, so we'll see). I do have ~20 A. exaltata and a dozen or so A. purpurea...about to plant a flat of each from seed I collected last year from my own plants.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Dan Carter
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    That's awesome, I'm growing all those for the first time this year. The seeds are winter sowing now.

  • Jay 6a Chicago

    LOL, I thought I was in the milkweeds forum becuase I just posted another plea over there lol. I think I have a bunch of threads over here looking for all kinds of natives. I just looked at the mail order natives site and they're still out of amplexicaulis. Will have to watch that place.

  • Dan Carter

    ...actually, derp, I ordered two amplexicaulis from them too, but they were quart-sized and, again, very southern, so I'm still looking for Midwestern seed. I'd forgotten. The plants they sent were decent. If I recall, last year the milkweeds didn't become available until after their typical shipping season, but they were willing to ship to me in summer if I waved my ability to return if they baked in transit.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Dan Carter
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    I've heard others up here say they had bad luck with southern plants they ordered and that they only get northern ecotypes now. I've done some weird deals trying to get seeds like negotiating to get out of a bid. What really got me crazy was when somebody was selling 25 variegata seeds for $640.00 on ebay. Not long after that you could get 25 for 12. I didn't have any variegata seeds for a long time and it seemed it was the one species everyone else wanted to grow too. So I sowed seeds for all the other Illinois native asclepias species too which is a lot of species. I wonder if there are wild stands of amplexicaulis, quadrifolia, and lanuginosa out there somewhere in all that land between me and you? They have videos on youtube showing plants that are usually at protected sites.

  • Dan Carter

    It depends on the species and varies among source populations even, if they are distant. It's actually what I studied (prairie plants from OK to NE) graduate research. The Starhill Arboretum in western Illinois, for example, has bur and chinkapin oaks from all over their North American ranges. They all do fine. Research at Iowa State looking at horticultural suitability of leatherwood has actually found, that while some individuals die, those from Florida that survive are the most vigorous and best performers. I garden exclusively with plants from North America east of the continental divide, but I've had success with more southern species, and in some cases, plants grown from seed I gathered at more southerly locations (e.g. E. Kansas)...that's where all of my A. tuberosa and A. viridiflora are from. I even grow Escobaria missouriensis from Kansas and Oklahoma with now problem. Asclepias amplexicaulis is actually pretty common in central Wisconsin. I've seen it. I even have some in my area, but I've never seen a pod on it, and it in places where it wouldn't be ethical to collect the seed. A. lanuginosa is threatened here, and I'm not sure anyone has seen it produce seed. I am also not sure anyone has seen it at any of the SE WI locations for decades now. A. quadrifolia is all further south.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Dan Carter
  • Jay 6a Chicago

    I think people need to start hand pollinating them if they rarely produce seed. I know it's complicated but I think in this case it's worth it. I'm doing a lot of experimenting with growing some natives out of their range.

  • Jay 6a Chicago

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  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Bump. Still looking desperately.

  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Still looking. Can anyone help me out?

  • Jay 6a Chicago

    Dan Carter. I'd like to talk with you and catch up. Get back if you see this.

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