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How do you fix hardwood installation issues?

Becky
March 11, 2019

I'm building a new house and there are some issues with the flooring installation. I'm meeting with the boss tomorrow and trying to decide on what will be an acceptable fix. Can I get some opinions on how best to address these issues? The flooring is Versini Virgilio Collection which is an engineered hardwood. The issues are:


1. There are several spots where the joints running length wise aren't tight, so you can see the ugly backing. I suspect they will want to get a pen out and color it. That doesn't seem reasonable to me, but I'm not sure what to ask for instead.

2. There are also a few joints where it looks like a piece of material is stuck between the pieces on the ends. It almost looks like a shim was in there and cut flush, but I don't know why they would have used a shim. The dust mop catches on these pieces which is a pain.

3. There are gaps between the floor and baseboards in some spots. I can install shoe mold, but I prefer the clean, simple look with just the baseboard and it seems like a waste to install it on a full room when it is just one corner that is shy. Plus, I don't feel I should have to pay for more trim work because a sub cut the flooring too short.

4. There is another place where there is a gap and they filled it with some type of grout looking material. It is not grout, but it is the width of a grout line used in tile. It is in the kitchen at a door, so it is very noticeable.


I'd love some suggestions on how these issues should be corrected.

Comments (15)

  • millworkman

    Almost impossible to say without pictures. But ask the boss straight up if he would be happy with this install in his house..........................

    Becky thanked millworkman
  • lyfia

    Based on your descriptions none of these sound acceptable. There will be some small gaps that may need to be filled with woodfiller, but they should not be the width of a grout line. I'm guessing that is woodfiller at least on that part. You shouldn't be able to see the backing that doesn't sound like they even connected the pieces properly. As for the end joints with pieces of material. I can't even figure out what they may have done there.

    Becky thanked lyfia
  • homechef59

    I used the Versini product in an addition. I did see a little bit of the glue extrude in a few spots. This was supposed to be cleaned up and was very minor. I did put in base molding. The product did wear very well. I think what you are describing is a poor install job. As you are aware, this isn't a cheap material. Be prepared for a fight.

    Becky thanked homechef59
  • PRO
    Oak & Broad

    Becky , can you provide pictures. I'm curious to see #3 that you mentioned.

    Becky thanked Oak & Broad
  • PRO
    Johnson Flooring Co Inc

    Also curious about #3. If you want no shoemold, I assume the baseboard was installed after the wood floor.

    Becky thanked Johnson Flooring Co Inc
  • Becky

    Thanks for the comments. The pictures I took yesterday weren't good, so I'm not even going to waste time uploading. I'll try again today and will upload them this evening.

    @Johnson Flooring, yes, the floors were installed before the baseboards, so it should have been easy to avoid the gaps. In rooms like the pantry & dog kennel, I had the trim guys install shoe mold to resolve the issue and didn't bring them up to the flooring guys (other than to say, I fixed the problem here, so I want you to fix it there). Those are relatively small rooms and I can compromise on my ideal look. My living room is open to the kitchen, dining room and foyer, so if we install shoe mold in the living room we will need to do it every where.

  • cpartist

    I hate shoe molding. It always looks dirty.

    Becky thanked cpartist
  • Becky

    Finally got some photos.

    1. Joints aren't tight.


    2. something is stuck between the joints.

    3. gap at baseboard...

    4. gap filled with wood filler??? (This is in the kitchen & highly visible.)

  • robin0919

    It looks like your house was NOT built straight!! You need to have a serious conversation with your GC! IMO...either get it straight or serious compensation. I think your GC is using VERY cheap labor to make allot of money! What's new these days......

    Becky thanked robin0919
  • millworkman

    Just when you thought you has read it all...............................

    Becky thanked millworkman
  • homechef59

    When I said there was a little glue that could be wiped off, I wasn't talking about gaps this size. This is a bad installation.

    Becky thanked homechef59
  • worthy

    As detailed in a similar thread, industry and government standards for an acceptable gap is 2mm-3.175mm. Yours is way over.

    robin069 may have a point. But the flooring installers could have simply cut a triangular piece that would fit flush to the wall.

    Becky thanked worthy
  • A Fox

    No house is built 100% straight. #3 looks like a layout oversight. Ideally they would have ended with something less than a full width board on each end so it can be cut to fit the wall and not need a shoe. That gets more challenging sometimes when the same floor extends from space to space, but someone who knows what they are doing would plan ahead and have a reasonable fix.

    Becky thanked A Fox
  • Becky

    I hate shoe molding. It always looks dirty.

    I thought it was just my cleaning abilities! LOL.

    It looks like your house was NOT built straight!!

    I think it is just the floor that makes the walls look like they aren't square. The gaps shown in photo #1 aren't consistent along the board. One end might have an acceptable gap and the other end looks like the photo. Once you get to the end of the room with a couple of skewed boards it looks like photo #3. If it were a smaller room instead of the open floor plan, it might not look so bad in that corner.

    robin069 may have a point. But the flooring installers could have simply cut a triangular piece that would fit flush to the wall.

    Sounds like a triangular piece might be the "fix" for now. We are so far over schedule that if we don't convert our construction loan we will get hit with extra fees. I might not gain as much fighting over this as I'll lose in bank fees for not wrapping it up ASAP. It kills me to say this, but maybe I'll have to live with it for now and redo the floors ourselves at a later date. I've installed vinyl and tile flooring as a DIY project in previous houses. It took FOREVER because I wanted it right, but they looked good. I'm guessing if I can do vinyl and tile as a DIY, I can do wood floors.

  • Becky

    No house is built 100% straight. #3 looks like a layout oversight. Ideally they would have ended with something less than a full width board on each end so it can be cut to fit the wall and not need a shoe. That gets more challenging sometimes when the same floor extends from space to space, but someone who knows what they are doing would plan ahead and have a reasonable fix.

    I think you're right. That is how I did my DIY tile and vinyl floors. I spent days planning the layout before I started. I don't expect professionals to spend days planning it, but since they do this on a daily basis I expect them to know how to do it and put thought into it. I think this guy just picked a corner and started working.

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