aegis1000

Optimara LooXo variety Gorgeous - June 2019

aegis1000
June 20, 2019
last modified: June 20, 2019

Optimara LooXo variety Gorgeous ... from Selective Gardener. I've had it for about a month now ...


Comments (27)

  • Rosie1949

    Very pretty! Rosie

    aegis1000 thanked Rosie1949
  • fortyseven_gw

    I like the color! Do you like it yourself? Joanne

    aegis1000 thanked fortyseven_gw
  • aegis1000

    Yes ... the color is more of a vivid violet ...

  • Paul MI

    So strange ... not seeing the anthers. Is LooXo an entire line of AVs or just the appellation for this one?

  • aegis1000

    There are others in development, two are commercially available ...

  • fortyseven_gw

    Their ad says they resemble hydrangeas and have more bloom count. A white one would be nice. Joanne

  • AnneCecilia z5 MI

    OK, I keep looking at the title and the name of this pretty AV and can't help wondering how on earth do you SAY it???

  • Rosie1949

    I am with you AnneCecilia!!!! If anyone figures it out,,,,let us (and the world) know!!!! lol Rosie

  • dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida

    It's so uniform and I love the color.

  • aegis1000

    Well ... aren't you the perceptive one.


    Methinks that Optimara did not make that obvious enough ...

  • AnneCecilia z5 MI

    Huh. Well, thank you very much Joanne for that 'translation.' I really hate it when companies go too far trying to be cute.

  • aegis1000

    Companies are composed of (generally well-meaning) people.


    I can imagine the marketing meeting ...


    "Let's call them "Looks so" Amazing, Gorgeous, etc."


    "Noone talks like that, Just say "Bada book ... bada boom"."


    "Hmmm ... how about "Looxo ... " ???"

  • Rosie1949

    Looko or loozo? Am I missing the obvious??? I don't get it yet and I really don't like the name! Rosie

  • fortyseven_gw

    It was just a guess. I don't know if that is the meaning. I think the new plants are very pretty, whatever they are called. I hope they keep producing them.

    I also like the regular styles with yellow anthers. But they are trying to control thrips to some extent.


  • aegis1000

    Rosie ...

    The names of the varieties of the LooXo series are ...

    Gorgeous, so ... "looks so" Gorgeous

    Amazing, so ... "looks so" Amazing

    Radiant, so ... "looks so" Radiant

    Splendid, so ... "looks so" Splendid

    Delightful, so ... "looks so" Delightful

    Luminous, so ... "looks so" Luminous

  • Paul MI

    Makes sense. Don't fault Optimara for trying to put a bit of whimsy in their product names, but have to agree it wasn't as intuitively obvious as I'm sure they thought it would be.


  • Rosie1949

    Ohhhhhhhh,,,,,,NOW I get it. Still not a fan but like Paul, I understand now. Rosie

  • fortyseven_gw

    An answer for how Holtkamp Greenhouse came up with the name they Trademarked as LooXo. It can be read at www.floraldaily.com. "How removing a trait can add value." Optimara "Filantherless African Violet Makes Headway." Lawernce Holtkamp, of a younger generation, who handles on-line commerce offers an explanation. The plant has only the female gene or X chromosome. Also, they X'd out the male gene. He did not say how it is pronounced. Aegis, you are right, he said they imagined in their marketing meeting, when the consumers looked at them, they would excitedly use adjectives like "amazing," etc. Joanne

  • Rosie1949

    How is this AV propagated? (or did I miss that conversation?) Rosie

  • fortyseven_gw

    I suppose by leaf. I have not read. My guess is that leaf propagation might not result in an antherless plant.

    The reason I say that is because I

    I bought an AV that has both kinds of blooms, but more conventional than plain. So I am guessing it is not a dominant trait.

  • Earle

    Perhaps, instead of leaf propagation, it needs to be treated like a chimera and propagated from a bloom stalk.

    Earle

  • Rosie1949

    I was wondering if it had to be treated like a Chimera, that is kind of what I was thinking. Rosie

  • fortyseven_gw

    The company spokesman commented they spent ten years developing the process and kept it top secret. They filed patents and trademarks of the plant process along the way before they released it, including the name, and several other factors. They expect this to be a major breakthrough and a commercial success. They want to protect this new development for as long as possible. It sounded as if they feel if it succeeds as a commercial success, they will introduce this feature to many other varieties. Joanne

  • irina_co

    It probaby will do OK from leaves - and even with patents - Optimara won't go after little hobbyists - only after big commercial growers to prevent mass propagation without paying the royalties.

    Since it doesn't produce pollen - and it takes a lot of energy - it will put out more of these cute male sterile blossoms out. Since it has a stigma - it can be used as a seed parent - so that's why they have a variety of them. Probably the very first one was a mutation - natural or chemically induced. Luckily this mutation was stable.

    The propaganda about less pests and pathogens because it doesn't have pollen - is only propaganda - thrips will eat pollen if it is available - and switch to young and tender central leaves - if it is not. You just do not see them that much.... but they will be there. If they do not have filet mignon - they will switch to baby greens.

    It is wonderful that Optimara works on all these novelties. Makes us crave!


  • fortyseven_gw

    Excellent advice

  • Paul MI

    Unlikely to be a chimera, I think. More likely just taking advantage of a mutation. Such mutations occur throughout horticulture. Many of the double or triple petaled flowers on plants that normally would produce single blossoms -- like the double blossomed Rose of Sharon -- are the result of a mutation in which the cells which should have given rise to anthers became petals instead. Not a far leap to see where a mutation might occur which would simply prevent the development of anthers without increasing petal count. Wonder if Optimara will stick with the series name. While it does take a bit of getting used to, sort of hope they keep it for whimsy sake. :-)

  • fortyseven_gw

    They trademarked the name and patented the process. They spent ten years developing this feature.

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