SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
janeway452

Living with glass shower doors. Love it or hate it?

janeway452
last year

I'm about to renovate my lovely 1940's bathroom. I'm decided to ditch the tub in favor of a more practical walk in shower, looking to make my home more appropriate for aging in place. I realize how easy it's been living with a shower curtain, but love the look of the glass shower doors, but know that all the sparkly pictures I see on Houzz don't show the reality of every day living with these doors. Wet room or no door is not an option. I worry that there will come a day when I can't maintain them properly and they will become water spotted and ugly. I'd be really curious to hear from you all about how you live day to day and whether you've come to love or hate them?

Comments (23)

  • PRO
    GN Builders L.L.C
    last year

    If you love shower curtains, they have improved nowadays





  • Related Discussions

    Love my large living room....HATE my fireplace.

    Q

    Comments (20)
    The room seems very dark and gloomy to me. If I were designing this space I would suggest: 1. Paint all brick white 2. Replace mantle with a three sided, bulkier version (this would minimize the impact of the brick) box out, trim and paint lower portion of brick that sticks out (pic) 3. Add mullions to the windows 4. Mount a flat screen tv, either on the wall to the left or on the brick. I think adding it to the left would balance out the visual weight of the fireplace. Add large console below for storage and balance. 5. Paint the door white 6. Paint the room a lighter color 7. Add a large area rug, 8x10 ish. 8 consider replacing the sectional with a lighter color couch and love seat. 9. Add coffee table to anchor the space. 10 Add ambient lighting by way of wall sconces or floor lamps.
    ...See More

    Love? Hate? Hafele kick pedal garbage bin door opener: 502.15.250

    Q

    Comments (1)
    We have had one since we redid our kitchen maybe 10 years ago. we really like the hands free opening, but I will say that we on our second or third toe kick mechanism. It also gets loose over time. Despite the maintenance issues, it is nice to open the trash without touching it. Guests ar often confused though. We are moving and redoing the new kitchen. We want to include one in the new kitchen as well.
    ...See More

    Notched shower glass door over shower bench in a small bathroom?

    Q

    Comments (46)
    And, with three panes of glass, the actual doorway to access the shower stall will be very narrow. It may be difficult for anyone who's not petite to enter the stall to take a shower or clean it. OP - I feel for you. We've all made mistakes at some point. I hope that you'll update this thread once you've figured out how to fix this issue.
    ...See More

    Do you love/hate your sliding barn doors?

    Q

    Comments (18)
    We have mostly barn doors in our house including on bathrooms. This is an actual farmhouse since we are farmers. We wanted to use doors from old barns we have or have had. Two came from our 5th generation farm and my Grandpa made them. We also used hooks to close the doors that came off of various gates and doors. We used different rails and see a big difference in quality. The Home Depot one is the quietest and smoothest. 2 from Amazon are made by different companies and neither are that great. They work but are noisier and not quite as smooth. The 4th isn't installed yet but we went back to the Home Depot model. We added wood around each door to make them fit and gave them a frame look. 2 had decent old paint and I was able to color match. 1 we used the black pieces that came with the kit from Home Depot to go on the top and the bottom instead of adding wood. We also added a piece on each end to make like a backwards L if that makes sense for privacy. For the bathrooms we have not had issues with sounds or smells. Our hooks pull the doors in slightly so it is a tight enough fit. We also have fans that help.
    ...See More
  • D N
    last year

    I know that our glass surround and door at our previous house were treated with something, most likely Showerguard. We used a squeegee during the wet-body-drip-dry minute or two after turning off the shower, and the glass always looked great. And we are by no means neat freaks, other than maybe wishing that we were neater.

    We had fixed glass with one large door that could swing either in or out. There was some sort of seal/bumper on the door opening side made of ?silicone? that kept the water from getting out.

    janeway452 thanked D N
  • Lil S
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Glass will require you to squeegee after every shower. My husband often uses another shower to avoid this step (or else hear it from me) LOL. If you don't bother, it's not hard to clean later with a water/vinegar solution and a microfiber cloth.

    It's a matter of how much do you want/love the glass and are willing to do light, but daily work to keep it sparkly vs a no maintenance shower curtain.

    janeway452 thanked Lil S
  • Helen
    last year

    I have a frameless shower door which is made with Showerguard.


    I don't squeegee at all. At the end of the shower, I use the shower head to hose down the interior for any stray blobs of shampoo or soap and it's completely streak free.


    I can't stand a shower curtain - why spend money on an expensive beautiful shower and cover it with a curtain. And shower curtains require more maintenance than a shower door in my opinion. And I always hated the clammy nature of a shower curtain hitting my body.


    Invest in the uncharge for Showerguard and enjoy your beautiful shower maintenance free.

    janeway452 thanked Helen
  • c9pilot
    last year

    Glass shower enclosures allow much more light but may obstruct the control handles. I absolutely hate reaching under the shower head to warm up and getting that blast of cold water - ugh! If you block your controls with glass, ensure there is a cut-out for reaching inside!

    janeway452 thanked c9pilot
  • linus2003
    last year

    The best tip to maintain glasshowerdoor and the whole shower is to get a thick terrytype microfibercloth. These are the ones cardetailers use to polish or dry cars. I did not start from the time my shower were new but 2 months ago I did a big clean to clean it to like new and have after every shower now dried it with the microfiber and it looks like I just cleaned it. I wash the microfiber cloth in the washingmachine once a week on sanatize and I will do this for as long as I have this shower. It beats scrubbing with harsh cemicals.




    janeway452 thanked linus2003
  • AJCN
    last year

    We also do not squeegee at all. We do have a whole house water softener and Showerguard. I spray it down with the hand held if I see a blob of something, and I wipe off the curb with my towel if there’s water on it. We leave the door pushed inward (swings both ways) and the transom open (streamer) so that the exhaust fan can do its work without the door sticking out into the bathroom while we’re getting ready for work. I clean the glass once a week.

    Having said all that, our home is not designed for aging in place. We have a regular doorways, tubs, shower curbs and glass shower doors. The nicest aging in place bathroom I’ve seen on here is Nancyinmich (can’t remember the name of the thread). Perhaps you could meet with a kitchen and bath designer who is an aging in place specialist. From what I understand they can give advice that is as small as grab bar placement, and as extensive as a full new home build property line to property line, and everything in between.

    janeway452 thanked AJCN
  • adawn5
    last year

    We have hard well water with a softener.


    Basement bathroom has a glass door and small glass fixed panel. No showerguard or any special treatment. I just squeegee it once I turn the shower off, towel off and then I use a small microber cloth (bought in bulk from Sam's Club) to finish drying the door and panel completely (it's a really small door and panel so quick and easy). The time period that I'm toweling myself off in the shower with the shower door open post-squeegeeing is critical because most of the remaining water evaporates during this brief time so the microfiber cloth final step isn't wiping up much. Maid comes once a week and cleans the glass with only non-ammonia, safe for glass products such as Glass Plus or Sprayway glass cleaner.


    Master bathroom has a long fixed panel, no door. Staphire glass but no Showerguard, etc. Mom squeegees it after showering and wipes it down with a pluffle towel (and yes, the pluffle lasts forever, leaves almost no lint behind, does the entire glass panel, grab bars, and all the shower fixtures with no trouble and is worth the money). Maid cleans the glass once a week with non-ammonia cleaner as mentioned previously.


    I think the glass in both showers still looks great. My mom's is kind of annoying to squeegee and dry off, I think because I'm so used to the small basement glass which goes so fast, like 2.5 swipes but she doesn't seem to mind. It really takes less than 2 minutes.


    For the hall bath though we did a shower curtain on a curved rod since we have a 32" tub and the curved rod helps it feel larger. Plus if I'm filling/dumping a bucket in the tub or the future owner wants to bathe a dog or kid, I figured a shower curtain is easier. Shower curtains require maintenance too as far as washing the liner periodically and even the exterior curtain. We leave the curtain open so that room appears large and you can see the pretty tub/shower.

    janeway452 thanked adawn5
  • mark_rachel
    last year

    I also have Showerguard & it’s worth every penny!!!

    janeway452 thanked mark_rachel
  • Helen
    last year

    I wanted to add that I just remodeled with a view towards aging in place for the bathroom.


    I got rid of the tub/shower in favor of a large (to me) shower that follows the footprint of the tub. Based on my own views of functionality and the advice of my experience designer this is what I did specifically for that


    1. Shower isn't curbless but curb is as low and narrow as is functional and permitted by Code. In my experience with aging relatives and friends, most do not need to roll into a shower in a wheelchair but can walk over the curb - either with the assistance of a helper if they are at that stage or with a grab bar placed at the entrance of the shower so there is something to aid in balance while stepping in and out


    2. Grab bars are critical and need to be installed during construction as they must be attached to the studs. You need real grab bars as these are constructed differently than towel racks. There are a lot of non-nursing home looking grab bars available.


    3. I installed a bench at the end opposite the entrance. I love my bench - don't anybody tell you different :-). I have had experience with portable benches and stools because I needed one after surgery for a few weeks. A portable bench takes up a lot more room than a bench and then you have the issue of storage and having to clean around it.


    4. I installed a grab bar horizontally along the long back wall of the shower. This provides something to grab wherever I am in the shower and also would provide assistance if one needs it for rising from the bench


    5. I installed two hand held shower heads. One is by the regular shower head by the door and the other can be accessed while sitting on the bench.


    6. Not sure if this is specific to aging in place but a thermostatic valve for the shower is much nicer than a pressure balance valve.


    7. As long as you are constructing add grab bars next to the toilet. Again they don't have to look "medical". Mine doubles as a towel rack.

    janeway452 thanked Helen
  • functionthenlook
    last year

    I never had a glass shower enclosure, but i know I wouldn't want one. I don't like that the soap, shampoo, conditioner, body puff, etc is for all to see. It looks messy. All the commercial pictures you see of glass showers they have nothing in the shower. What do you take everything out of the shower after your done? I am not into cleaning a shower everyday just after cleaning myself.

    I once rented a house for a week with a glass shower. There was a note with a squeegee to clean the glass after every shower. Yea, sure. That didn't happen. I didn't pay a mandatory cleaning fee to clean a shower. After 4 people using it for a week that glass was disgusting.

    I have never had a shower curtain clinging to my body, but of course I don't buy cheap plastic shower curtains. I buy the fabric kind. When dirty I just throw it in the laundry and put up the extra one.

    Just wondering can glass showers shatter?

    janeway452 thanked functionthenlook
  • D N
    last year

    Our fixed shower glass (as opposed to the door itself) started four feet off the floor. Any holders for shampoo etc were well below where the wall ended and the “window“ began.

    janeway452 thanked D N
  • wdccruise
    last year

    I squeegee off the glass

    I've never understood how a shower curtain would stay inside a shower base.

    Kohler Bellwether shower bases with offset drains are designed to replace tubs.

    janeway452 thanked wdccruise
  • Nancy in Mich
    last year

    My shower curtain billows inward just a bit on my curbless shower during a shower. It has never moved out of the shower. I have a heavy vinyl liner. It just barely touches the shower floor. The shower is 63" x 37" in size and the vent fan is outside the shower and pulls 80 cfm.

    janeway452 thanked Nancy in Mich
  • remodeling1840
    last year

    The shower enclosure in my previous home was almost 20 years old. We used Tilex once in a while, not even every day. It was cleaned once a week on cleaning day. It looked brand new when we left. The shower tile is a focal point in the room and shouldn’t be hidden. I always feel a curtain makes the room feel smaller by blocking the view.

    janeway452 thanked remodeling1840
  • Mrs Pete
    last year
    last modified: last year

    but know that all the sparkly pictures I see on Houzz don't show the reality of every day living with these doors.

    What I hear you saying: I am a realist. I want something practical that will work with the minimal upkeep I'm actually going to give the shower door/curtain.

    I have glass doors in my hall bath -- it's not something I thought through at the time; I just went with doors because it's what's done today. I neither love nor hate the, but it's always a mistake to skip analysis. I should have CHOSEN rather than just ACCEPTING.

    Have the glass made with Showerguard so the soap scum, etc rolls off

    If you go with doors, this is a must-do.

    If you don't have that "built in", you can use Rain-X or other products, but they do require re-application every couple months.

    Glass will require you to squeegee after every shower.

    Speaking only for my own household -- ain't gonna happen.

    why spend money on an expensive beautiful shower and cover it with a curtain.

    Part of the question is, do you intend to spend money on an expensive, beautiful shower?

    If you know you want to go with glass, then splurge on the lovely tile ... but if you know the goal is a shower curtain, you can lower the cost /amount of grout to clean by choosing a large-scale white tile.

    Glass shower enclosures allow much more light but may obstruct the control handles. I absolutely hate reaching under the shower head to warm up and getting that blast of cold water - ugh! If you block your controls with glass, ensure there is a cut-out for reaching inside!

    I agree that the blast of cold water is bad ... but you can request that your controls be placed in convenient location whether you go with a curtain or a glass door.

    1. Shower isn't curbless but curb is as low and narrow as is functional and permitted by Code ... Grab bars are critical and need to be installed during construction as they must be attached to the studs ...

    Agree. After reading about so many poorly installed curbless showers (and the cost!), I decided to give up on that ... who knows whether I'll ever need it anyway? Instead, I'm going to build a minimal height curb, which is only 2", and I'll have a grab bar right there in place. I don't think I'd want a minimal curb AND a small shower, but in a larger shower, I think it'll work out just fine. I think it's the "happy medium".

    Yes to grab bars ... if you're concerned about aging in place, skip towel bars altogether and choose grab bars all around (on solid plywood). The only negative: Price. I say skimp somewhere else ... bathrooms are one of the biggest deals when it comes to aging in place.

    Pay attention to grab bars in public places. I actually measure /sketch such things in my little book.

    3. I installed a bench at the end opposite the entrance. I love my bench - don't anybody tell you different :-).

    I disagree with this. The bench is what it is ... you can't move it /can't change it. So you install a handheld shower that can be used while sitting ... but later, if you need someone to wash your hair for you, the handheld is in the wrong position; if you have a stool, you can adjust its location, and it's easy for your helper to use the handheld for you. Likewise, if you later need a shower chair, you can move a stool out /bring a shower chair in ... it's much harder to move a built-in bench. Yes, you must clean around a shower stool, but with the handheld showerhead, this isn't a difficult task. With some planning, you can even have an alcove into which you can tuck the stool /shelves above.

    Don't forget, a third option exists. My mother has a lift-up wooden seat attached to the "back end" of her shower. Attached to the wall, it doesn't require storage space and has no legs to clean around. I don't particularly love it, as I think it lacks the moveability of the stool and the solidness of the bench ... but she adores it.

    I don't like that the soap, shampoo, conditioner, body puff, etc is for all to see. It looks messy. All the commercial pictures you see of glass showers they have nothing in the shower. What do you take everything out of the shower after your done? I am not into cleaning a shower everyday just after cleaning myself.

    Yes, the people who take pictures of large glistening showers behind lovely glass doors don't want you to imagine their product filled with a variety of plastic bottles, a couple dead razors, and dripping washcloths. A shower curtain will hide a multitude of sins; however, in all fairness, you can plan your shower so that your necessities are hidden behind a pony wall /the shower can appear to be empty except for your beautiful tile.

    I have never had a shower curtain clinging to my body, but of course I don't buy cheap plastic shower curtains.

    Confession time: My college daughter recently moved into a new apartment, and the two of us did buy the cheap plastic shower liner /covered by an equally thin shower curtain -- literally from the Dollar Store. It's awful; as you say, it clings to your legs while you're showering. Of course, her shower is tiny too. Heavier shower curtains are absolutely the way to go ... heavy plastic liners with magnets in the hem.

    I always feel a curtain makes the room feel smaller by blocking the view.

    This is a fair criticism, but I've never been in favor of minimal-sized bathrooms. My above-mentioned college daughter's bathroom reminds me of WHY I feel that way.

    janeway452 thanked Mrs Pete
  • janeway452
    Original Author
    last year

    Thanks for all the helpful insight. Mrs Pete has zoomed into the ideas that I've found very helpful. I will definitely have Showerguard glass. Absolutely no shower curtain, though what I've been using is a lightweight quick drying polyester fabric (can't remember when I stopped using a liner). It's fine for one use before it dries so it's fine for me. Mrs Pete, your daughter might want to try it. Very good point of having the controls in a reachable place. Realize that is one advantage of a curtain as I realize that I reach in and lift the shower button before I get in. I'll keep that in mind, but wonder how it can be done. Cut out? I'll opt for the lowest curb available. Bench? Maybe not if it cuts down on space, but I do find I use the benchy things on my American Standard "Cinderella" tub for washing my legs. Never use them as a bench, but will look for something that sticks out that I can put my foot on. I think I have seen something like that for shaving legs. For the time when/if I need a shower seat, I'll deal with it then. My house was built specifically for the two grandmothers (family across the street in the "big house") over the hen house. So when I look at my tub enclosure some things make sense. Those "benches" probably helpful for the old ladies. Those soap dishes with a handles are actually grab bars (not a place for wash cloths) which I use every day as I get into the tub (the higher one), the towel bars can be used as grab bar, because I understand the the tile and everything is set in concrete which is going to be extra fun at demo). Multi function grab bars will be a must and I'll add one by the toilet to double as a towel bar. I realize that I probably won't mind a quick squeegee if it truly leaves the Showerguard glass spotless, as I am already using my squeezed out washcloth to wipe down the wall down to the top of excess water on the left side by the door and the benches. I'm halfway there already. Also, yes I am a realist and always look at home improvements through the practical eye of "how easy will this be to maintain." However, it's taking me a little longer to actually accept finding someone to come in to clean once a week or two. Sooner or later, it will likely be a necessity, but right now I have to try to "treat" myself to a little help. I've always stopped at the thought of a cleaner when my circular thinking brings me back to I can do it myself. I think the pony wall is a great idea for hiding all the soaps and shampoos, which would be on the right side. I also like the idea of ledges for this stuff. All your ideas will help me choose the perfect shower design!


  • D N
    last year
    last modified: last year

    My mother's house (built in 1950) had that tub! I didn't know it was called a Cinderella tub. That thing was great!

    Hers was flipped 180 degrees from the photo (including the faucet), so it was easy to get in and out, even though she had sliding doors. It was nice and long, since it was on the diagonal, and the triangles were perfect for putting stuff on.

    I completely understand why you're swapping it out, but if they still made the things, and if I had room for it in my house, I'd put one in. Hmm, the upstairs bathroom, hmm...

    janeway452 thanked D N
  • janeway452
    Original Author
    last year

    Yes, it is unusual and charming and sad to see it go, but it's time. It and the rest of the bathroom have been easy to live with because the tile is in very good shape and is not one of those "ugly" colors that really make it look dated like pink and turquoise. It also helps that the fixtures are white, also in remarkably good shape. The soap dishes in the tub are awfully corroded and I was never able to find replacements and if I had would have been very difficult to remove (set in concrete), so I've lived with them. The sink faucets were also nasty and corroded, but I was eventually able to find "new" shiny reproductions. I had removed the original medicine cabinet and found a very good condition vintage replacement that matches exactly what the original looked like. All the other chrome, like towel bars and sink legs are also in very good condition. So, I've happily lived with my vintage bathroom for 26 years. It's also the one remaining aspect of my cute little "Cottage House" (the name given for the grandmothers' house), except for the hardwood floors. The house is small and has just the one bathroom and I know the common wisdom is that houses with a tub sell better than just a shower, but at this stage I'll just let my heirs worry about it or choose a cheaper nursing home! Also, everything else about the house will make it desirable and sell-able to the right single or couple.

  • Lars
    last month

    Glass shower enclosures allow much more light but may obstruct the control handles. I absolutely hate reaching under the shower head to warm up and getting that blast of cold water - ugh! If you block your controls with glass, ensure there is a cut-out for reaching inside!


    I used Hansgrohe controls in my shower, and if I turn the knob to the left to turn on the water, it comes out of the hand-held shower; if I turn the knob to the right, it comes out of the rain shower, and so I always turn the water on through the hand-held shower first, and I never get a blast of cold water on me.

    Bathtub to walk-in shower conversion · More Info

    The bottom knob controls the temperature, and the top knob controls the pressure and whether the water comes out of the rain shower or the hand-held shower. I like having separate controls for volume and temperature, and so once I have the temperature set where I want it, I can make the volume whatever I want.

    janeway452 thanked Lars
  • sail_away
    last month

    For the last 30 years we've had showers without doors or curtains in the last 2 homes we built. The shower is designed so the water stays in the shower. Each was designed by us and they were different in size and shape. Wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Helen
    last month

    @Lars - I also have the same type of valves in the shower - thermostatic system where the source and temperature are controlled by different valves. Mine is a three way diverter because I have a hand held shower that is by my bench.


    Like you I step into the shower and select the hand held which is pointed away from me and there is no blast of cold water.


    janeway452 thanked Helen