jamie_z7bhz8

Veggie Tales - September 2019

Jamie
September 1, 2019

Summer is coming to an end. How did your gardens do this season? What are your plans for fall and winter? Happy September, everyone!

Comments (228)

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Today's photos...went to pick up a load of steer manure (they compost it and mix with sawdust so nice to work with) and other shopping so no fun in garden except to take these:


    Hard to see them but this poblano pepper is covered; chili rellenos here we come.


    Color coming up on goat sac tomato yeah!



    I picked one of these upright peppers; had the plant misnamed I think they are lipstick. It was very sweet and fleshy.



  • Jamie

    I hope we get some heads on the cabbages. Our Brussels Sprouts are growing pretty slowly also


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    I’m giving the seedlings some time in full sun this morning. Many of them are pretty much ready for transplanting.


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    Given our forecast though, I’ll probably just have to pot them up and wait a few more weeks. The temperatures will be hot - in the 90s until at least next weekend.


    Edit- according to accuweather.com, it will be in the 90s and high 80s until around the 26th. I think I’ll just wait until then to transplant them , unless I see that they’re getting too root-bound.

  • jacoblockcuff (z6 NW Arkansas - Hz7 - Sunset z35)

    Planning for spring is not something I’ve begun yet hahaha. I actually do enjoy planning the garden though, and I always look forward to it. The challenge is finding the time to do so!!


    September 12th is the day our area has seen its earliest first frost. Meanwhile, this year, it’s still holding upper 80’s/lower 90’s this week, still no sign of a cool down in my 10 day forecast.


    Im picking up the tractor that runs my tiller and sickle bar mower today. I bought a complete, running 25HP twin cylinder horizontal shaft and two 20HP twin cylinder parts engines, as well as 2 sets of wheels for $300 from a guy locally this past week. The twin cylinder goes in the Massey, the bigger tractor I’m picking up today, and I’m going to throw the Massey’s motor into the Allis Chalmers I picked up a few weeks ago, which is my new mowing rig. The Massey should make a great little tractor to use around the property and gardens. I’m going to build a loader for it next. If I can pick up a small piece of property to start a market garden on at some point, that Massey will come in real handy. That sickle bar mower would REALLY work well for cutting down cover crops, and that plough and tiller should really tear up the ground with that 25HP motor. The transmissions, Sunstrand 90’s, seem to be in good shape.


    Kevin, I seem to recall you used a little Wheel Horse 416-H to start your gardens?


    Tony, those are some beautiful pictures, the birds. We tried feeding the birds for a while last winter, but it got to be too much money to feed the little pigs!








  • 14tomatoes_md_7a

    Picked all ripe large Casper eggplants today -- enough to fill a 12 quart pot. A few small ones were left with just a few blossoms (so, might get a few more by early October).

    Tony





  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    I weeded and turned over enough soil to plant a short row of Scarlet Nantes carrots and two 8 foot rows of Black Seeded Simpson lettuce. I think it's too late for the carrots, but I'm experimenting to see what happens and possibly overwintering them. Kevin inspired idea. I planted carrots earlier, mid July, I think, and got nuttin.

    I fixed an old brass hose nozzle, by cleaning out a lot of leafs, pine needles and whatnot inside. I used an old wire pick from the days when computers had wire wrapped 30 gauge solid conductor wires connecting on the back of the main board or motherboard. Wouldn't mention that except so many of you are computer folk

    Jacob- I'm envious of that tiller, not to mention a loader. I could use a loader to load my horse manure into a pickup truck. I'd be really full of it then!!

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    Richard - The humming birds must love you with all the nectar you supply them! I just was hearing a tap, tap, tap outside my house. Finally I got up to investigate and saw a bird pecking at the corner of the window. It moved around to the other side of the house. By the time I got my camera out, changed the lens, and went outside, of course the bird was gone. It was pretty small. Black and white were the colors I could see from inside. Sorry to hear you can't get the shingles vaccine. I'll hope you don't get a case of shingles.

    Not too much exciting going on here. I pulled out a couple more tomatoes this morning. It is certainly beginning to be garden-clean-up time. However the weather doesn't indicate it's time for that. 90's here for the foreseeable future.

  • cindy_7

    Tony - That's a lot of eggplant!! Will you freeze it in slices?

    Today was another fairly cool day here. High of only 80 and overcast the majority of the day. The rain chances keep dropping this evening because the air isn't charged up from heating up. There's another cool front moving through tonight.

    Dinner guests just left and again I had lobsters from my chef. Tonight it was lobster rolls. Everyone loved them. Next time I'm going to ask for blue crabs, a DelMaVa tradition here. (Delaware, Maryland and Virginia).

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Ready for rain


    Picked 5+ pounds of ripening tomatoes because we are due for 1" of rain tonight.


    Also scoured the NT half runner beans and picked half a dishpan full. Amazing they are still blooming and only a few days from flower to picking size. Everything trying to reproduce. Interesting how the pole beans start setting fruit down near the ground when they feel the weather changing.


    Two of my 3 tree collards have broken the light weight tie I had on them and fallen over. So I harvested everything on them and cut them back to about 3' tall. Will use some rebar to stake them this time I think.

  • Jamie

    It’s slowly getting ripe. the others are all stubbornly hanging on to their green skins


  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    Harvested tomatoes today:

    We figure there's about 3/4 bushel in this one haul. At 56 lbs per bushel that'd be 42 pounds.

    Later I picked pole beans for dinner, plenty for the two of us.

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    Nice haul there, John. You've got some real beauties. I'm down to the last of my tomatoes. I still have 5 in the ground, but I should probably pull them all now.

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Fermenting tomato seeds and they germinate ? These were in water 3 days...was a speckled Roman tomato that I was not terribly fond of but surprised at this outcome!


  • 14tomatoes_md_7a

    Len -- looks they are not fermenting. Did you scoop and add a few spoonfuls of tomato gel/juice to get the fermentation going, or did you just drop the seeds in a bowl of water?

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Thanks Tony...probably minimized the gel...will try again soon.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Len - Good looking harvest with all of the colors in the rainbow and then some. I don't add any water when fermenting unless there was very little gel and then only maybe a couple teaspoons. I did have seeds of one variety start to sprout in the fermenting process.

    John - Nice tomatoes! The few weeks of peak harvest can be overwhelming can't it? I pulled out one bed of tomatoes on Friday. I'll probably pull the rest next weekend and then burn the plants later in the fall in my burn pit.

    Richard - the new Shingrix vaccine is not a live virus vaccine. You may the thinking about the old vaccine which was a live virus. Check with your doctor and hopefully you can get the new one. Weren't those chicken pox parties a hoot back in the day!

    Jamie - why are you letting that lime get overripe?

    I harvested about 4 lbs. of fillet beans and Dragon's Tongue on Saturday. My brother and his family were in town over the weekend and I boiled the beans with some small potatoes and we had them with BLTs for brunch yesterday before they left.

    Cindy - How's Mahomes working out for you on your FF team? He had a 5th touchdown pass yesterday but it was called back on a penalty.

  • cindy_7

    Jack - Mahomes is working out just great! I wish that fifth touchdown hadn't been called back. However, two of my other players were injured last night so now I have to go shopping for replacements. I didn't win yesterday.

    My beans all of a sudden are really producing now, too. I had pretty much picked all that were of any size last Thursday, and was able to pick plenty again yesterday.

    Urg! It's supposed to be 90 again today. If so, that will be day number 56.

  • Jamie

    Here also, Cindy- we have had 71 days over 90 since May 1. We had a few cooler days when we had rain, but we have not had rain in almost 3 weeks now. There's a slight chance this weekend, and I am hoping that prediction comes true!

  • cindy_7

    Same here, Jamie. Our last measurable rain was on 8-28 so it will be three weeks on Wednesday. What's your average number of 90+ days?

    We're supposed to have a cold front move through late today/tonight. Is it predicted to make it all the way to you?

  • cindy_7

    October is usually our driest month.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    It's supposed to be in the upper 80s to low 90s all week here and then cool down on Saturday and stay in the 70s until the end of the month. Little rain chances until the weekend.

    Other than having to water the few beds with fall stuff in them I'm not missing the rain. I'm tired of mowing and I'd like a break before it's time to start collecting fall leaves for the compost.

  • Jamie

    Cindy- I think the long-term average number of days over 90 is 64 ... I'll look it up and see, but I remember reading that.


    Here's a forecast ... It's supposed to cool down a little by the end of the week:

    http://www.memphisweather.net/forecast.shtml




  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Geez, this checking in a couple times a week here is just not cutting it - I am missing out on lots of conversation! Sorry for delayed responses to some questions.

    Cindy - Yes the Cucamelons are from Baker Creek. I am going to give a shot at saving some seeds for next year. I imagine that they might be prone to crossing but we really didnt have many other cucurbits in the front yard garden.

    John - We do try to sort by type of tomato, but I admit I am not real great at pricing accordingly. I kind of haphazardly put together pints. In my head when laying out the tomato table I try to make it so some of the more tender and interesting varieties will be a 'light' pint, and plain red slicers or less perfect fruits may end up a bit 'heavy', I charge $3 per pint, not by weight, so I should be getting some pricing adjustments on the backend that way. A "normal" pint weighs about 1 lb but we dont want the hassle of a inspected official scale so we do everything by volume or bunch. I do think that I could 'glam up' the tomatoes a bit more with different signs for the different varieties, descriptions, talking points, etc, and that would probably increase sales.... but so far I have only had one or two weeks where we didnt sell out so it hasnt been a low-hanging fruit for us to improve on yet.

    Our tomatoes are looking primed for a heavy late crop - we have a fall festival we are attending the last weekend in Sept so hopefully they are ready then. The couple weeks of cooler temps we experienced about six weeks ago really helped blossoms set. A couple shots of TTF didnt hurt.

    Yep we get bears here, neighbors to the farm caught them on security cams this spring, but none of my attempts at catching them on trail cams worked. Seems every year there's a few cubs that got kicked out of the den that take a while to understand they cant just peruse peoples garbage cans in suburbia.

    Jacob - 90% of my customers want 'Green Peppers' and 'Red Tomatoes'. I've started to convert some of our more frequent customers into trying some of the other varieties. I think that some education needs to be done, or I just need to focus more on providing what they want. Probably somewhere in the middle.

    You got a good deal on those tractor engines, and it sounds like you have the knowledge and wherewithal to get the ol girls back to peak shape! Yes we broke ground with a 1993 Wheelhorse 416H (Onan engine), and it's 48" deck has been the primary grass cutter on our property while we are shopping for the right larger tractor (Ill post some photos separately, dont want to lose this response). The market garden got the first major capital purchase this spring with a used BCS 852 walk behind tractor, with a few new attachments - rear tine tiller, - flail mower, and rotary plow. I use the flail mower on our hillsides that are too steep for the ol' horse.

    John - I didnt get any messages? And our market hasnt been cancelled or moved. Its every Saturday from 9 to 1 until October 12th. We will be at Angora Gardens Fall Festival on Sept 28 and we go on vacation the second week of October so we wont be at the last market. Farmers markets really take a dive after school starts so we're kinda looking forward to the end of the season honestly.

    Get some row cover for the carrots if you dont have any already. They will take some frost (and actually sweeten up quite a bit from it) but they wont love the bitter cold we usually get come December.

    Those are some beautiful maters! Are you noticing a later tomato season this year also?

    I'll post some photos and updates separately. Not that this thread needs help with the post-count!

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Tomato house, and fruits of the labor. You can see my haphazard sorting. There's always so much to do at market that I end up rushing through it. Last pic is a special order from a friend who is making dried tomatoes - 8 lbs at $20.


    Well that didn't work... sorry no photos I guess.

  • Jamie

    Well ... one more attempt

    I found some black swallowtail caterpillars on our fennel today. I’m going to let them have these plants

    https://www.butterfliesathome.com/black-swallowtail-butterfly.htm


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    Our ginger is blooming also. They have a beautiful scent


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  • cindy_7

    Thanks for the info, Kevin.

    We did a taste test of the beans that I am growing this year. I only grew two varieties this year, one a French fillet bean (Cobra) and the other Roma II. Hands down, the Roma beans were the best, no contest. Both were prepared the same way: one leek, two cloves of garlic, one hot pepper and the beans, all sauteed in the same skillet using the same grape seed oil, though cooked separately. The Roma beans were just so, so good!!

    Jamie thanked cindy_7
  • Jamie

    I had to double-check and make sure I didn't wake up in south Texas at Richard's house this morning .... Our official high temperature yesterday was 100 degrees! That's the first time the actual temperature has gotten that high in 3 years- the heat index is routinely well over 100 throughout the summer, but the highs are usually in the upper 90s.

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan

    Jamie, the ginger flowers are beautiful. I don't think I've ever seen them before. Can you grow plants from grocery store ginger chunks? Do you eat the roots from the ones you grow?

    What a lot of caterpillars! I had several swallowtail cats on dill earlier this year. And monarch cats almost did in the 3 ornamental milkweed I planted near our front entry. Of course they passed up the huge patch of common milkweed I purposely left for them out in the far back yard :)

    Jamie thanked naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
  • Jamie

    Naturegirl - yes, you can usually grow ginger from the chunks you buy at the grocery store... I've done it and a friend of mine has also. Unfortunately, though, that variety isn't hardy in areas that experience frost. We are growing Butterfly Ginger (Hedychium coronarium) https://www.plantdelights.com/products/hedychium-coronarium and I don't think it's edible.

    I don't think grocery store ginger has flowers that are as showy as these, but I've never had one of them flower. They get very large though- and need a big pot. The stalks will be 3-4 feet tall.


  • cindy_7

    I tried to grow ginger once and wasn't very successful. After reading what Jamie wrote, I think the pot may have been way too small.

    It hit 92 in DC yesterday and 90 at Dulles but at my house only 87. It wasn't a bad day out there either.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Yes, true edible ginger is not frost tolerant at all. You might want to try growing horseradish root instead. You can't kill the stuff....well maybe if you tried real hard. lol

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Whatever you do don't let the horseradish escape into your garden!


    Our high temperature today will be 60 degrees and 1/2" of rain. My poor tomatoes are shivering out there.

  • cindy_7

    Len - I bet your tomatoes are shivering. I noticed on the weather map that near Seattle some of the highs were only in the 50s yesterday. Was hoping that you were not getting those temps.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Len - I'd like some those cooler temps here right about now and so would most of my fall garden. It was 95 yesterday and will be in the 90s through Thursday. I have my lettuce in my shadiest bed that doesn't get any sun until late morning and it's doing pretty well if I water 2 or 3 times a week. My broccoli and cauliflower are hanging in there but I'm afraid it's going to bolt if it doesn't cool off soon. My radishes are not growing right due to the heat. I keep sowing more every week or so in hopes that it will cool down sooner or later.

    My horseradish is confined to a couple secluded 3x3 beds that I can mow around so I've never had any 'escape'. I'll be harvesting one of the beds in November and the other will be harvested in fall 2020. I'm hoping that letting each bed grow for 2 years without harvest will allow the roots to get thicker than when I only had one bed that I harvested yearly.

    Please ignore the weeds!

  • RD Texas

    Jamie, we actually had 3 days in a row where 94 was the high and it rained for about an hour but not enough to show in the rain gauge. Two or three of my giant kohlrabi plants are getting a really large bulb and I will harvest them today or tomorrow. I will post some pictures along with the sweet potato growth

  • Jamie

    The temperature at the Memphis airport hit 98 today, breaking the all-time record for the hottest day in September. It might rise a bit more but the weather guy here at work doesn't think it will reach 100.


  • cindy_7

    So that leaves 99 :-)

  • Jamie

    Exactly hahahahaha

  • Jamie

    An update on the Kratky lettuce. Two of the plants have died- their roots never grew down into the nutrient solution like the other plants did. However, the survivors are doing well



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    I started another one in a “costco-sized” plastic coffee can. It’s about a gallon in size.

  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    I dug about 4 row feet of Kennebec potatoes. Got a big grocery bag full. Weighed 10 pounds. I'm really happy with production on those and with the Dark Red Norlands. But I'm not happy with the Canela Russets. I was told over the weekend that russets don't do well in this area. She said colored potatoes do well, the reds and blues and golds.

    I'm thinking about a potato memory from 40 years ago. A farm off Rt 1 in NJ north of Princeton. They harvested potatoes and left them out. They had a pile maybe 6 feet wide, 4 feet high and long! Maybe 100 feet long. They left them there for days, I thought you won't supposed to wash potatoes for long term storage. So rain won't wash them????

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan

    LoneJack, I don't see any pretty flowers on your horseradish like the ginger had :) Maybe I will grow it: it is one of the few veggies I have never tried growing...not sure I've ever eaten it either. Maybe that would be good to do first!

    I harvested all my potatoes. It was an average harvest. I was not sure what to expect. They grew at my away-from-home plot where plants grew differently than at home. The potatoes grew for much longer than normal so I thought they yield a large harvest. That was not to be, but I'm pleased with what I got. A young boy, maybe 3 years old, was around with his grandparents when I was digging them. I invited him to watch and help. He told me about his garden and noticed several things about mine that I doubt most adults would see. It was fun to talk with him. He took along an Adirondack Blue potato to try.

    I also harvested carrots from that plot....the best ones I've ever grown even though deer ate some of the tops. It's too bad I don't really know why they did so well there.

  • Jamie

    That sounds like a nice day!

    I have never grown horseradish either but I do like eating it from time to time. I’m not sure I’d use enough to warrant growing it.

    john- I’ve wondered about things like that also. But maybe they dry off enough and the water doesn’t fall in them with enough force to damage them.

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan

    John, when I grow potatoes at home I always wash them with a powerful spray from the hose nozzle. I know it is not recommended but the clay they grow in will not come off any other way. If I did not wash them the clay would about double their weight :) The washed ones have stayed fine in storage for several months. I dry them inside set out in a single layer for several days before bagging them up for storage. I think dry, dark, and cool are key to long storage.

  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    I washed my early Red Norlands, but I wasn't planning to store those. I have some of those still unwashed for next years seed.

    I have clay also, but I amended my 5x16' potato field enough that it's mostly loose loam with an occasional clump of clay. The ground was dry today, several days, and the potatoes came out fairly clean. No worm holes, my reason for digging these up.

    The soil in NJ near that farm was sand, but of course I don't know what was on the farm. Maybe he hauled in clay to improve his soil? ?not! Another thing I don't know is what was under the potatoes. Paving, sod, soil??

  • Jamie

    Cindy- the unofficial high was 99.6 hahahahaha almost 100!

  • cindy_7

    That's great, Jamie! Love it!!

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Jamie - you can keep those temperatures to yourself. Low 90s is plenty hot for me in mid September. Looks like I only have to wait 2 more days before the cool down starts and so does the rain. The fronts that are lining up off the PNW will give us rain chances almost every day beginning Friday.

    Naturegirl - Horseradish actually does flower the second year when grown from crowns. Small white blossoms in May/June. If you've ever eaten cocktail sauce with shrimp or fish you have had horseradish....it is ketchup, lemon juice, and prepared horseradish. After I dig the roots up in November I wash them, peel them, and cut into 1" pieces. Then I put them in a small food processor and chop it up fine. Wait a few minutes and then add a bit of vinegar,salt, and sugar and pulse the food processor a bit to blend it up. It increases in heat the longer you wait before adding the vinegar. Next it goes into 4 oz. jars and into the freezer until needed. Besides home made cocktail sauce, we use it on roast beef, sandwiches, and almost anything to add a little zing.

    I already have some Yukon potatoes starting to sprout. Seems a little early. Norlands and Kennebec still look fine. I only have about 15 lbs. left total.

  • Jamie

    Hahaha, I'll try, Jack- Today's predicted high will be 98 but it's supposed to cool down by Friday when the high should be in the upper 80's with highs near 90 next week. Maybe I'll be able to transplant this weekend!


  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    I am SO ready for this heat to break! Predicted for here the next 7 days: 90, 90, 82, 85, 88, 88, 88. Bring on the cool, please!
    When I dug my purple majesty spuds many were sprouting, so I put 10 or so right back in the ground. Those plants are big now and I recently noticed some blossoms. At the same time I planted out some Kennebec spuds that i had left from my spring planted potatoes. I’d kept them in the fridge. They had long sprouts, but I gingerly planted them. The purple majesty plants are much bigger than the kennebec plants. I am eager to find out what’s underneath. Won’t dig them for quite awhile since I still have some previously harvested spuds available for eating.

  • cindy_7

    It was down to 55 overnight here!! That's cold! However, this weekend could be in the low 90s again.

    September is normally our 4th wettest month. Not this year. We've only had a trace so far this month. Will be starting the sprinkler again. My neighbor already has him on.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Cindy - at least you had a short break from the heat. Enjoy it while it lasts! It's been pretty dry here as well. I'm getting tired of watering. Not sure if I'll bother putting in much of a fall garden next year. Maybe just a few beds.

    Margi - I have a few volunteer Red Norlands and Kennebecs in one of my beds that I planted carrots, radishes, and beets in. It is a real disorganized mess with everything mixed up. I'm loving it! I doubt these volunteers make anything useful before they dies off with the first frost.

    I'm surprised that you won't stay cooler next week. My forecast doesn't show anything over 81 after Friday. Are you supposed to get any rain?

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