saconnon

What fungal diseases affect roses in W Wash / PNW?

I am sending my sister, who lives North of Seattle, a rose. But the Hybrid Rugosa I am thinking of sending her is apparently sensitive to rust due to Hybrid Perpetual genes. I know black spot is a problem. I grew up there though didn’t pay that much attention to roses in my youth, but I don’t recall seeing rust or powdery mildew on roses. Rust and Powdery Mildew are definitely problematic in SoCal, but Blackspot is almost nonexistent here. So any rosarians living in the Pacific Northwest please advise on which fungal diseases are problematic there. Thanks!

Comments (21)

  • Paul Barden

    Is it Rose a Parfumerie de l’Hay? If so, your sister would be wise to avoid trying to grow it. It’s the only rose I ever grew that had Rust, Mildew and Blackspot at the same time, in copious amounts. Horrible rose in this climate. Sorry .

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    Of course, listen to Paul. Otherwise, I doubt your sister would have any diseases on rugosas in the NW.

  • Paul Barden

    @Sheila: When she said hybrid Rugosa with HP genes, I immediately figured she was talking about 'Rose a Parfum de l'Hay', and that rose is a total nightmare for disease: it gets everything in the book, often all at once.

  • smithdale1z8pnw

    For me it's blackspot & powdery mildew, I grow several rugosas, none have fungal issues.

  • Paul Barden

    True Rugosas will have few, if any, disease problems. Stephanie was inquiring about a specific hybrid that has Hybrid Perpetual genes in it, and has a reputation for Rust and other issues - I suspect she is asking about 'Rose a Parfum de l'Hay'.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    I never tried that one Paul. She did sound like a weakling outlier in the rugosa group and maybe not even that fragrant to top it off. Thank you.

  • Stephanie, 9b inland SoCal

    Thanks for the feedback Shelia, Smith and Paul! Yes, Paul you guessed it, I was checking out Antique Rose Emporium, which has the Rose a Parfum de l’Hay. Sounds like it’s too disease prone. Perhaps Bayes Blueberry would be a better choice. She wants something in the dark red range. Plus fall foliage and hips would be nice.

    She also wants something she can plant in the far reaches of the yard that wouldn’t need water in the summer, once established. They get about 42 inches of rain a year, near Arlington WA, so a lot, but almost none of that falls in July and August. Are there types of roses that one established wouldn’t need summer water? Maybe once or twice in the summer if you remember? I was thinking Rugosas might fit this requirement.

  • Stephanie, 9b inland SoCal

    Actually I was thinking of Basye's Purple Rose, which is much darker than Basye’s Blueberry. I get them mixed up.

  • Paul Barden

    Stephanie, almost any of the purebred Rugosas will work in that situation. Here in the Willamette Valley it’s similar: we get no significant rainfall between July and October. I have several rows of purebred Rugosa seedlings in the test area that are 15 years old and they get no supplemental watering during the dry months, and yet they do just fine.

    However, there are no true reds in the pure Rugosa group, only deep purple/magenta hues. Linda Campbell is a great red, but it gets huge, has no fragrance, and is prone to Blackspot in some climates.

    Basyes Blueberry is a fine shrub, but it’s only a medium pink.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    I do love Basye's Purple.


  • Vaporvac Z6-OhioRiverValley

    Yes to Basye's Purple! : )) even if it doesn't like my limey soil!

  • Stephanie, 9b inland SoCal

    Basye’s Purple is very sweet. How is the fall foliage and hips? I see no fall pictures of it on HMF.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    It is a spare, gawky bush on some level. I love it but it is not to everyone's taste. I think you know your sister. Rosarie dl Hay or Hansa might suit many people better.

  • Vaporvac Z6-OhioRiverValley

    Glad to know it's not just mine, Sheila! :-)!

  • Paul Barden

    Fascinated at first, I came to dislike Basye’s Purple for its “broken coat hangers” architecture and it’s habit of suckering up to 6 feet from the parent plant. It doesn’t bloom well enough for its size/footprint either. A curiosity with serious flaws.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    Mine is tucked in among other plants. Agree it does not make it as a specimen for sure.

  • Vaporvac Z6-OhioRiverValley

    But those stamens! : )))

  • Stephanie, 9b inland SoCal

    I decided to send her two Rugosas from High Country Gardens. Hunter and Snow Pavement. Thanks for all your feedback!

  • the_bustopher z6 MO

    During the time I lived in the suburban Seattle area I had plenty of problems on my roses with the usual suspects - blackspot, powdery mildew, and rust. Rust seemed particularly vicious and needed a special spray. Oddly enough, when a smelter was up and running in the Tacoma tideflats, it put out enough acid fumes that the acid rain from it kept the fungal problems down somewhat. Then, when the environmental issues got going, the smelter closed up and got torn down. The acid rain stopped, but the fungal diseases got a big green light to get going, and they did.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    Stephanie, you should switch to Therese Bugnet or Hansa and Snow Pavement. They will do and look so much better. Hunter is not a classic best of class. Roseraie d la Hay is also great but out of stock. I know I'm not your sister, but I have grown these and they will look so beautiful with Snow Pavement.

  • oursteelers 8B PNW

    Stephanie mine just went in the ground this summer, thanks to a trip to Northland, but I am excited to see what your sister thinks of SnowPavement.

    I’m about 45 minutes south of Seattle so our locales should be pretty similar.

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