sendmgw

Sleeping Lofts and Bathrooms

sendmgw
2 days ago

Looking to build a new small home for just my wife and I, in the interest of downsizing our living space. Am drawn to multi-floor dwellings with the top level being the open loft sleeping area.

Most designs do not have a bathroom on this level, and while I'm fine with that, my wife doesn't particularly care for the idea of making the trek downstairs in the middle of the night should the need to tinkle arise. Very understandable.

My thought is that if you add a room (a bathroom in this case) to the room-less and open loft, you've somewhat detracted from the design purity and intent of the loft area.

Any thoughts on these feelings?

Comments (40)

  • bpath reads banned books too

    Do you want a lift that is open on all sides? I'm not sure I'd find that ready to sleep in. If the loft has a back wall, behind it would be a fine place for a bathroom, and a closet, too. If you really want everything but the bed downstairs, then you could have a half-bath in the loft, but you'll still want a bit of storage for TP, robes, soap, and a couple of towels.

    As far as design and intent purity, I would think that the intent of home design, especially for a sleeping space, should be comfort. If the lack of a bathroom nearby makes one uncomfortable, THAT detracts from the design and intention.

    sendmgw thanked bpath reads banned books too
  • sendmgw

    Bpath, here’s what the top floor looks like. My wife would wholeheartedly agree with you! 😊

  • Related Discussions

    What color should I paint my adorable antique wash stand?

    Q

    Comments (21)
    Oh my dear - I LOVE what you've done with that navy/wainscoting room. I'm def no expert or decorator, but you really are in the right track. In my opinion, it depends on where you are putting it, no? I see your livingroom has dark accessories so leaving it alone except for a cleanup would suffice. You could also go for an off white/vintage/distressed look, which would match. Again I'm no expert, I just received help on my own room lol If you enjoy painting and like the distressed look I swear by Cece Caldwell paints. No priming ,no mess ,no voc's - it's amazing. Good luck and I also like the silver idea from nataly
    ...See More

    Sleeping loft ideas

    Q

    Comments (10)
    I didn't quite understand whether you want to place the bed widthwise? But I presume 10ft means widthwise. I have found this calculator useful in figuring out heights for loft: https://www.collegebedlofts.com/loft_height.html Another thing to consider - if the loft will reach from one wall to the other wall, you may then be able to do away with the feet/support, for a more spacious feel. If the loft will not have access to window (which seems to be the case) then keep in mind that it will be dark and will require lighting. Also because warm air tends to get trapped up there, you may need to consider a fan blowing in there, to keep things cool and the air moving up there! The room shouldn't feel cramped as even with a full bed the width of the loft need only be 4-5 ft, which is less than the 12 ft length of the room, and the window should let in plenty of natural light even if the top of it is slightly impeded by loft (depending on height available), but perhaps white walls may help with this! I don't see whether or not a safety rail placement should matter whether it's a full or twin sized bed? In any event, given the squeezed nature of the space up there, the bigger the bed space (i.e. Full) the more comfortable your daughter will be. A twin with low ceiling may feel cramped! To get up there, you may consider inserting ladder rungs into the wall perpendicular to the bed (sideways), so visually there is no ladder impeding the vision built sideways into the wall see eg image 19 or is it 18? here: http://deavita.fr/maison/lit-mezzanine-adulte-petit-appartement/ ) or here: http://houzz.com/photos/41987
    ...See More

    Laurent Chalet Project - Loft Ensuite Bathroom

    Q

    Comments (2)
    Really liking this space!
    ...See More

    Barn door in sleeping loft - can I lean against it?

    Q

    Comments (5)
    I think what you are missing is that barn doors are not really "attached" on the bottom/sides and there is a gap between the door and the opening. You'd have to consider what kind of guide system you are using on the bottom and whether that will stay on track (literally!) with someone leaning on it.
    ...See More
  • Lindsey_CA

    "... my wife doesn't particularly care for the idea of making the trek downstairs in the middle of the night should the need to tinkle arise."

    Sometimes the middle-of-the-night need isn't just to tinkle. And what if the need is just to tinkle, but you or your wife (whomever has the need to tinkle) has a bum ankle, knee, or hip?

    sendmgw thanked Lindsey_CA
  • latifolia

    Your wife is correct, as she likely usually is. Sleeping lofts work for kids in a weekend house.


    If you’re downsizing, are you approaching retirement? Many people are looking for one-level living at that point. Having to climb down stairs at night is not desirable.


    And old guys get prostrate problems, so this may not just be about your wife!

    sendmgw thanked latifolia
  • Joanna Cucchi

    If this is for long term use, ie aging in place, a multi story home with the bathroom on only one level seems impractical. My knees can hurt pretty badly now and I am in my 40s.

    sendmgw thanked Joanna Cucchi
  • live_wire_oak

    Your program is faulty. It’s not a tenable design premise for anything more than a cabin for the able bodied.

    sendmgw thanked live_wire_oak
  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Don't re invent a wheel. Use a half second story. Remember that stairs are safer than a ladder, need space, and get an Architect. Yes, Get one. Unless you are one, and in that case? Don't re invent a wheel. Build a tiny guest house even. Loft bedrooms are for teens. Design "purity " means usefulness AND beauty. You may as well include privacy, which is another issue, along with safety, noise , hvac etc.

    sendmgw thanked JAN MOYER
  • barncatz

    Our architect designed house is 32 x 20. Three floors. The top floor has the bedroom (with door) at the front, storage and a half bath along the long wall while a 10 x 16 area over the downstairs is open to the ceiling. So, a partial loft. I am retired, DH is not.

    Anyway, 1) your wife is correct about the bathroom. I actually wish it was a full bath. 2) several years ago, DD returned here for a summer and slept in the open area, rolling up her air mattress every morning. It was nice to have a bedroom with a door because she stayed up later than we did. Also, sometimes you just want a damn nap and you need a bedroom door, and 3) I danced up and down the stairs until a fall last spring. Sometimes I still do, sometimes it hurts but it hasn't killed me when it does.

    Hope this helps.

    sendmgw thanked barncatz
  • sendmgw

    Thanks everyone. All of your answers are helpful. Blinded by lust can be a problem. Like wanting a low riding Corvette as a daily driver only to find out it's not very good for the back or knees.

  • Robbin Capers

    I lived in a place like this for a year (with very steep stairs you had to go down backwards though) and it was a real pain to go down to the toilet. Design purity doesn't mean much at 2am. Squeeze at least a half bath in there.

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    Sleeping lofts, in many aspects, are the same as having a bed in your living room.

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    " . . . the need to tinkle arise."

    Stop using technical terminology or no one will be able to understand you.

  • sendmgw

    My apologies, Mark. I’m an IT guy! LOL!

  • sendmgw

    By the way, Mark, my wife and I keep falling asleep on the sofa in the family room, so it’s almost like having a bed in the living room now! LOL!

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Every man dies with tools he no longer uses, a car he can no longer get in or out of, toys he can no longer see to play with. EVERY man. I am convinced this is why God made the 85 inch TV. and the recliiner.

    Women? We die with shoes we can no longer walk in. That's about it. Hopefully.

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting

    That is the truth Jan. As for the loft subject IMO a poor choice as you age even with a bathroom. When we bought this house our first thought was the ability to live on one level and we have a walk out basement that should the need arise we can turn into a suite , make a few bucks and still enjoy our home..We don’t have much info from you so hard to know what size of home you really need and where it is being built.

  • sendmgw

    I will have you ladies know that I’ve shared the link to these comments, as my wife will feel fantastic reading the show of female solidarity!

    Jan, a thought I was bouncing around was to sell our large 4 bedroom home, and temporarily downsize to this 1 bedroom loft home. We’d live in it for about 5 years and then rent it out or AirBnB it. We’d then next build our true home which would be a conventional ranch home. So this loft was a stopgap, and a means of affordable long term rental income, while also having some fun with a unique design for the short term. I didn’t intend to age out in it.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Doesn't matter. Nobody wants to climb a stair or worse, descend one to pee in the night. NOBODY. Build a two bed tiny house instead. Rent that out. Or just DO the age in place house to start. Like now. Study the landlord issue too. Not everyone treats a rental like you would. ......................................in fact? It is RARE.: (

    The age in place home of your dreams probably costs a lot more to build, than you think it will. Takes more time to plan than you think it will. Think about that too.

    Btw, age in place rarely means until death,unless you are lucky or have incredible resources. Life interferes in ways you can not yet even imagine. You plan for the "worst", and hope for the best. Emphasize hope.Add prayer.

    Yup....... I could tell you lots of stories. Lots of them : )

  • Robbin Capers

    For an AirBnB it'd be fine, though still a negative for some (and for you while you're there). People who can't deal with the stairs will rent elsewhere. We're also building a couple of loft-style tiny houses to help pay for our dream house. A friend had better luck with VRBO, which seems to attract slightly longer-term renters, so there's less housecleaning (though potentially more wear on appliances and so on.)

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    LOL. My dad used to always say: "Don't bet the ranch". He was on the money with that one.

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    Maybe the sofa and TV should go in the loft and the bed in the family room??

  • Helen

    My first apartment in Manhattan was a loft with a sleeping loft.


    Even with a young bladder, I sometimes wound up crashing on the living room sofa.


    I am not even understanding why it is a clean design to exclude a bathroom and closet.


    FWIW, I also don't understand any kind of living levels which are reached by spiral staircases. When I see people with roof decks with difficult accessibility, I think about how little they will actually be used because every single item needs to be brought up and down.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    "If you build it they will come" ? Not always.

    Reminds me of the "fast ferry" we had here 15 years ago.. Cross lake Ontario to Toronto! Yeah...........great. Especially on Lake O in November. No, they did not come. After a month, and a gazillion dollars, nobody came. So it is long gone. One of the biggest idiot debacles in our history. The "don't bet the ranch " dad was right about that one too. It wasn't all that "fast" either.

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    As a rental cabin in the Rockies, I’d sleep on the sofa. You already do that. Ever really think about the Why? Because it’s easier some nights. Think about that. As a rental elsewhere, without a spectacular loft view? I wouldn’t even rent it.

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    Having a spectacular tub in a giant master bath window goes unused. The 48” range gets 2 burners used. The giant walk in pantry has a bag of Doritos and a case of Pellegrino. The soaring 18’ ceiling has burned out light bulbs, and you read under an blanket in the bedroom nook with the 8‘ ceiling.

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    Don’t let grandeur and ambition to dazzle with the life you lead in your head make you wasteful and blind to the ways that your real life of backpacks and snacks and schedules rushing out the door can be improved. Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    Do a functional analysis of your existing home’s real life. Get the floor plan printed. Laminated. Get the dry erase. Trace your patch’s and steps. X’s for spots you linger more than 15 minutes. How do you USE this house? Your next house won’t make you magically change that. But it could improve a few things if you work with the right architect, and become more self aware.

    Architecture can improve life’s and affect human behavior. What it won’t do is change The Who you are, or the Why you do some things that you do. No more than buying that 48” range changes you into a Bobby Flay. The biggest predictor of Future Behavior is Past Behavior.

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    Buy the Not So Big House series of books. Digest them for a while. Do your functional analysis. Your next home can be both Architecturally Stunning, and be perfect for Aging in Place. You just need to self reflect and find your right team. The hard fact for most people to realize is that they are the most able that they will ever be at this moment in their lives. And that the future may come calling prematurely.

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    Breaking a leg happens when you’re 10 or 50. Being diagnosed with something that accelerates accessibility needs happens every day. Humans are only temporarily fully able bodied beings. That’s the beauty of Universal Design. It’s for everyone. It’s not “just for the handicapped”. It‘s principles work with the toddler and your great grandma both. Or some guy in his 50’s that pulls a hamstring.

    Pay attention to the life you actually lead, not the dream life that you won’t lead.

    ——Certified Aging in Place Specialist

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Bravo Cooks Kitchen. Bravo.

    "The hard fact for most people to realize is that they are the most able that they will ever be at this moment in their lives".

    Put that on your fridge. Then go walk through any upscale senior living facility. Note the mobility devices.

    Nah.............that will never be YOU. I say the same thing. We are all idiots in this regard, especially me, as i cared for two parents and have moved quadruple the number to lovely facilities with lovely everything as I downsize them!! I still say it as I go to visit an iNCREDIBLY spry and engaging 92 year old, who rather replaced my mom .......and who became a true dear friend despite age gap. , I blast through that entry at 4 mph, skirt the slow movers......NAH. It won't be me. lol. Like I said, add prayer.

  • barncatz

    We moved from a one level to this house in my mid-50s. I have lived with our stairs to the bedroom level part time for 6 years, full time for 9. I only need to go upstairs once at night and down once in the morning because there's also a bathroom on the main level. I got increasingly stronger as I retired from a desk job and moved to a retirement where my horses came home and there was mowing and muck composting and daily horse care and walking a long driveway.

    There hasn't been a day that I haven't thought how much I love this house, including the winder staircase that is a design detail that I still stop and admire. If we plan a house for how we really live, why would I have built a house fifteen years ago for the day I may need a walker, a day that still has not come?

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    I have seen house where it is more like "If you build it they will run away screaming".

  • sendmgw

    The Cook’s Kitchen, fantastic comments! I majored in architecture at Brooklyn Technical High School. I didn’t continue with it in college (switched to computer science) but it still fascinates me at times. But you are absolutely right about analyzing how one actually lives versus some theoretical life. I have a wonderful Jacuzzi now that hasn’t seen any of our bodies this entire winter. A formal living room that looks pristine because it’s unused 95% of the time. An office which made more sense when we relied on desktop computers and paper based files. Now our files live digitally online, and most likely accessed with nothing more than a cellphone today. So I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about what we actually do, versus what looks good in the blogs. In high school architecture (before CAD), we learned the concept of “Bubble Diagrams” to conceptually design spaces and their relationships to each other. I suppose heading down the steps to pee does mess up the bubble diagram a bit. 😊

    I’ve been a landlord before. Rented out a condo I once owned. I was VERY fortunate in that I had a beautiful tenant who cared for the place as if it were her own. I do realize that you often don’t get such a lovely tenant, which makes the idea a smaller rental (less space, less things, less people, less problems) more appealing.

    I don’t think I’m going to build my next normal home where we live (NJ) as we have one of the highest real estate tax burdens in the entire country, and I’d rather not give NJ most of my 401k in later years!

    So we shall see what we will see, but you’ve all given me great food for thought!

  • Lidia

    We are with @barncatz! We’ve seen our parents take the cushy path...they worked hard, they should have it easy but it made them soft and then with it weight, health problems and depression because they could no longer live the life they hoped after working so hard to get there. We are finishing a house that promotes activity...real wood fireplaces, 3 story section with observation deck on 70+ acres of rough mountain terrain with a 4000’ creek. The house isn’t done yet, will be soon. I retired last summer from a very stressful desk job I held for almost 25 years (the longest in the entire state for that position)and already I lost half my goal weight without trying and this was after being laid up with foot and back problems after I started moving from sitting for 25 years. I feel great and can’t wait to fully enjoy living our dream full time. We refuse to live on a recliner in front of the TV!

    But we have a curbless shower and a bathroom next to each bedroom.

    Go for that fun house but yeh...add in the bathroom. And, just in case you may not be able to climb a ladder or stairs temporarily, make sure you have a smart back up first floor plan.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Not getting 'soft " or even unstable is a decision. What happens can be different and out of your control. Or the control of a spouse. Nobody "decides" to fall, to get dementia, to be anything less than the great way they feel at the moment.

    Have a friend who went to her doctor, hardly aged is she. Was asked.... "any falls recently? "

    My friend went on a tirade, insulted. " Are you kidding me, I am an ATHLETE!!" and the rant that followed included her forty mile bike rides. Arriving home, she entered from garage, tripped on the step, and promptly fell face first into the doorway, putting a lovely hole in the adjacent drywall with the door knob. LMAO even as I type.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Mark, my scream below every time I pass it.......



    The Mushroom House or Pod House is a contemporary residence in the town of Perinton, New York which has been featured in television programs (notably HGTV's Offbeat America series)[2] and books (notably the Weird U.S. series)[3] due to its whimsical appearance. Patterned after umbels of Queen's Anne's Lace, its brown color is more suggestive of mushrooms.[4] The house was constructed for attorney-artist couple Robert and Marguerite Antell between 1970 and 1972 and was designated a town landmark in 1989.[5]

    The structure is sited in a moderately-wooded ravine adjacent to Powder Mills Park. The house itself comprises four 80 ton pods which rest on reinforced concrete stems of 14 to 20 feet in height. These fan out from three feet in diameter where they connect to the pods to five feet at the base.[6] The sides of each pod's "cap" are completely windowed. One pod serves as the living and dining area, one as the kitchen, and two as sleeping areas. An additional "half pod" provides an open deck area.[7] The house has 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms in 4,168 square feet.

  • Kristin S

    Yes to planning for aging in place. My mom is an active 68 year old - hikes regularly, works out at the gym, etc.. Last summer she was hiking, started to lose her balance on uneven terrain, put the other foot down to steady herself and instead crashed it through an hidden series of mole tunnels. She broke her ankle in four places. It required surgical repair with a long recovery - a couple of months in a wheelchair, a minimum of a year to full mobility (though some experts say you'll never really get everything back from what she did to it), etc.. Six months in and stairs still give her problems. Fortunately my parents' house was built for aging in place, with master on the main, an elevator, curbless showers, bathroom grab bars, etc.. The moral of the story - aspire to stay active, but know that anything can happen.

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting

    Well IMO a bedroom without a bathroom nearby is never a good idea .

  • sendmgw

    My wife didn’t think my idea of buying her a box of adult diapers was my best comedy material!

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    That will solve your problem, because you will be sleeping IN the bathroom.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Which is where you will DESERVE to be sleeping. Hide the guns. And any rat poison stuff like that......................

  • Little Bug

    Here’s a cheery thought: you are younger today than you ever will be again. Ugh.

    And here’s another: build your pure loft and sleep in it. Your wife can sleep downstairs steps away from her convenient full bath. See how you like it.


    But on the bright side, age has its perks. I’m just a few months away from the golden age of Medicare (65). 💥💥💥



  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Hey, Don't knock It! You can proably get LA Fitness for 25.00 bucks a YEAR : )

  • suedonim75

    Whenever I see those tiny homes, or ladders leading to a loft, I think...”wow, that wouldnt be much fun if you have dddiarreah”, lol.


  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect

    I think I like the Mushroom House better than most of the houses accompanied by "Critique my floor plan" that are posted on Houzz .

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268