bostonoak

Rabbit-eaten Liriope Making Comeback!

bostonoak
24 days ago
last modified: 24 days ago

Last summer my condo neighbor and I planted Silvery Sunproof (Liriope) as a border to protect our front lawn. We had no experience with this plant. But we liked how it looked. Our 12-unit condo building took a vote that included other plants and the Sunproof won. By the way, I got the suggestion for this Sunproof from this helpful forum.

The only problem was that there has been a noticeable increase in rabbits in the Greater Boston area in recent years. The Sunproof got eaten up quite well during the winter. I worried whether they were going to survive.

Well, I've just noticed that they are growing new leaves!

Below are 3 photos.

This is how they looked when we planted them last summer:



This is how they looked in the winter after the rabbits began eating them:



And this is how most of them look now, after they started having new growth:



I wonder how fast and large they'll grow this year.

Comments (17)

  • PRO
    Yardvaark
    23 days ago

    The normal care of Liriope is to cut to the ground at the end of winter. The rabbits should be sending the condo assn. a bill.

    bostonoak thanked Yardvaark
  • laceyvail 6A, WV
    6 days ago

    Mine do too. It's been an unheard of cold May.

  • Embothrium
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    They still look hammered, and it is late May

  • bostonoak
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    The Liriope continue to make great comeback.

    I'm hoping Laceyvail's experience turns out to be my experience as well. In other words, the rabbits will eat the Liriope in the winter and leave them alone during the rest of the year.



  • ShadyWillowFarm
    20 days ago

    Get a fox. That’ll take care of the rabbit problem.

  • laceyvail 6A, WV
    20 days ago

    In my yard, rabbits eat Liriope only in winter and save me from having to cut it back come spring. When it regrows, they leave it alone, probably because it's not a favorite food and there are tastier items available. Deer have never touched it.

  • bostonoak
    20 days ago

    Jj J,


    Thanks. That's really helpful.


    I just can't believe the Liriope came back after being chewed on all winter. Depending on how they do, I might start to give them the same respect I give hostas which are extremely durable. :)

  • Jj J
    22 days ago

    Sorry, that’s my name for it. Liquid Fence Deer and Rabbit Repellent.

  • Embothrium
    22 days ago
    last modified: 22 days ago

    Those so inclined will now use the new bed for their dogs. Including letting them pee on the liriope plants. Otherwise the dogs can merely walk through the new bed and onto the lawn, like the new bed was not there.

    The first headache with trying to access the lawn from the sidewalk will be trying to push the mower over the plastic edging. And if you get the liriope to establish and fill in it will not be desirable to have somebody shoving a mower through it, over and over throughout the mowing season.

    The answer to both the dogs and the rabbits is a fence or wall, and not a narrow dribble of low plants that as it turns out the rabbits actually eat!

  • bostonoak
    22 days ago
    last modified: 22 days ago

    Jj J,

    Thanks for your tip. Does rabbit stink have another name? I googled it and could not find it. I presume you get it from your garden store?

  • bostonoak
    22 days ago
    last modified: 22 days ago

    Embothrium,

    I hear what you're saying but let me mention two things:

    1) The reason we wanted the Liriope border is that sometimes people walk their dogs onto our lawn and leave poop behind.

    2) Do you think the Liriope gets high enough as to prevent one from getting a lawn mower over them and onto the lawn?

  • Jill Wilson
    23 days ago

    It is really hard to kill Liriope.

  • violetsnapdragon
    23 days ago

    I read that liriope were deer-resistant, so I planted some. The deer munched mine right down. Now I know they are neither deer nor rabbit resistant.

  • Jj J
    23 days ago

    Rabbit stink should help. Only smells -to humans- while wet. Just don’t get any on your hands! Putrified egg, garlic, and other aromatics, applied every 3-4 weeks keeps the rabbits in my yard at bay. For reals.

  • PRO
    Yardvaark
    23 days ago

    Tell bunnies they can only chew it down once per year, and then it will come back fine. But if they keep doing it, it's going to decline.

  • Embothrium
    23 days ago
    last modified: 23 days ago

    Not if the rabbits keep hitting them through the growing season. But if it were my private home that I had full control over and I had just bought it taking that black edging and the bed out, bringing the lawn back over to the pavement would be one of the first things I would do with the yard. As it is now there is not even any way to get the mower to the lawn - from that part of the sidewalk anyway. And a lawn should function as a strolling route through a scene within which it occurs. With that strip there it is not possible to come down the steps behind, walk up the sidewalk and onto the lawn without stepping over the new bed. In other words the bed interrupts the natural flow through the involved space.

  • bostonoak
    23 days ago
    last modified: 23 days ago

    Yardvaark,

    Really? I did not know this. So do you think they will grow back to the size they were last summer?