ophoenix

State Flower - Washington State - Rhododendron What is yours?

ophoenix
7 days ago

Our state flower is pretty spectacular when in bloom. I shot these in the neighborhood this afternoon. Not sure old they are but I would guess around 15 - 25 years. It shows what can happen when you plant the right plant in the right climate. Rhodies have a reputation of not liking lots of sun, but these get sun at least 1/2 day and many are grown here in all day sun. The PNW is pretty far north so the spring sun is at a very favorable (low) angle. I included the pickup truck for scale.







Comments (47)

  • ghoghunter
    6 days ago

    Our i n Pennsylvania is the Mountain Laurel


    ophoenix thanked ghoghunter
  • jeff_al
    2 days ago

    outside playing is telling the truth about the camellia but it was not so several years ago...alabama's' state flower was the goldenrod (solidago, a native plant). it was changed to the non-native camellia later, probably for the great photo ops the plant possesses although i seem to recall one of the first ladies may have had her say in the decision. i do love them and grow several because they perform well here. one of my favorites from a few years ago, 'moonlight bay'.

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  • marilyn_c
    2 days ago

    Foggyj, when we lived on the bayou, a big Cherokee rose climbed to the top of a pine tree by our front gate. When I moved here, one of the first things I did was plant a Cherokee rose by a big pine tree by the front gate. It is still small, but they grow rapidly. It only had one bloom this year, but expecting better next year. They look so pretty when they cascade down from the top of a tree.

  • roy4me
    3 days ago

    California poppies


  • ophoenix
    3 days ago

    California poppies can be hard to grow in a garden. They flourish with neglect! rocky soil, no irrigation, really lean soil and lots of sun. They hate to be moved or cultivated and as you see by the beautiful photos grow in hills and over many acres. It is really magical to see the low hills in solid bright poppy orange along the freeways and throughout Antelope Valley in CA.


    I am sorry this thread got hijacked and thank you all for bringing it back to the subject. I love seeing all the beautiful pics and am learning so much about state flowers and trees.

  • nickel_kg
    3 days ago

    Oh that's interesting, buyorsell888. I didn't realize they had so many flowers, do they all open at once or just a few per day? and is that one of those little owl holes? The southwest is one area of our country I haven't seen much of, and unfortunately travel plans will be delayed a year or two.

  • buyorsell888
    3 days ago

    The state flower of Arizona is the Saguaro cactus. I live in Oregon but grew up in Phoenix and took this a few years ago at the Desert Botanical Garden there.

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
    5 days ago

    It is great to see the variety of flowers people posted. Some beautiful images.

    Michigan has the apple blossom as a state flower as arbordaves lovely picture shows. I can almost smell the scent when I look at it, but I know it is just because I stick my nose into so many sprays of apple blossoms.

    Michigan also a state wildflower, the dwarf lake iris. This native species grows near the north shores of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. It's native range is pretty much restricted to Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. It is a federally protected threatened species. It's a short iris with a lovely blue flower, but I do not have a photo of it.


  • sealavender
    5 days ago

    The California poppy in nature...

  • foggyj2
    5 days ago

    oops..didn't paste..will try again...

  • foggyj2
    5 days ago

    Georgia state flower is Cherokee Rose, so named for the Indians that inhabited this area of the country.

    Cherokee Rose

    Georgia State Flower

    Cherokee rose at Athens Botanical Gardens,

  • arbordave (SE MI)
    6 days ago

    Michigan = Apple Blossom, in full bloom now in my area (photo from neighbor's tree):



  • jemdandy
    6 days ago

    The State flower for Wisconsin is the wood violet. Its also the state flower for Illinois, New Jersey, and Rhode Island. I don't have a photo handy, but this week, I have 2 species of violets blooming in my yard, one of which is the wood violet.

  • DawnInCal
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    My pleasure, Fun2BHere.

    For most of my adult life, I tried to grow California poppies, but they are exacting in their requirements. They will happily grow in the crack of a sidewalk, on a rocky cliff side, a pile of gravel or a field with nothing but rocky clay soil. However, try to grow them in a garden with wonderful soil and regular water and they will just refuse to cooperate.

    About three years ago, we had one volunteer in a crack in our driveway. That one plant flourished and is responsible for all of the plants that were posted above. I am beyond happy that they chose our yard to put on such a beautiful show.

    Edit to add that for the sake of accuracy, the poppies in the 4th photo were not growing on our property. That pic was taken at a nearby state park.

  • nickel_kg
    6 days ago

    blfenton, of course you are welcome to join in any discussion! Why ever would you not be? I enjoyed reading about the flowers that grow well in your area, as I enjoyed seeing the various flowers other states picked as their "official" flower. Who cares if it's a state, commonwealth, or province? Very few, indeed.

    I'm so sorry you've felt unwelcome before. I apologize that I made you feel unwelcome here again with a careless word.

    Friends?


  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago

    Of course you and anyone else is welcome, it's not a discussion about internal politics. The mere insinuation (not by you blfenton) that there's something national or even quasi-patriotic (?) about the discussion that makes you feel somehow unwelcome speaks to how bizarre it is to speak of natural features or characteristics as "blessings" of a nation.

  • blfenton
    6 days ago

    nickel - If i'm not welcome to join in and my doing so is unwelcome, feel free to delete my comments. I've been made to feel unwelcome before, it's unfortunate but whatever.

  • nickel_kg
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    We are blessed, they are blessed ... ??? Oh, you thought I was being overly proud of our country, dismissive of other countries. Was that it?

    eta: but the original post was about state flowers, which sort of by definition focuses on the USA, as I see it. With neighbors welcome to join in, I presume.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    The world is beautiful, flowers can be lovely, but none of it is a "national blessing" as I see it, if that makes any sense. That was my sentiment. There's no national factor to it.

    A simple example, there are many other places around the world with the damp cool weather found in the Pacific Northwest - all have lovely rhododendrons. Do American Seattleites live in a more blessed nation than Canadian Vancouverites insofar as rhododendrons are concerned?

  • nickel_kg
    6 days ago

    Rather a tangent, Elmer, but of course you are free to use a word or not, as you prefer. To me, I'm a happy person and I consider many many things to be 'blessings' -- whether bestowed by a deity, or the result of workings of the physical laws of nature, or happenstance by chance -- machts nichts (or mox nix, as my dad would spell it). So to answer your questions, YES, all those are 'blessings' -- how wonderful that our Earth has had such varied conditions which led over time to such varied flora and fauna. It's okay if you prefer to talk in cold blooded scientific terms -- I can dig that too. What I don't 'get' is people who cannot be moved by the beauty and wonder of the natural world.


  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    I don't personally use the word "blessed" because of a frequent religious connotation that I don't share but in a general conversation, does it not suggest a reflection about something desirable being exceptional, unusual or fortunate?

    To me, there aren't any national, nationalistic, or "special" conclusions to draw or feel fortunate about concerning where particular plants or flowers are or aren't or which kind they are.

    All of the nation's artichokes are grown in the Castroville area of Monterey Bay. Are they blessed there to have artichokes? All of the nation's pistachios, and I believe almonds too, are grown in the hot Central Valley of the state. Are they blessed?

    Different plants like different conditions and any area with the right ones for a particular kind of plant will have lots of them, whether here or elsewhere. Are they all blessed or just suitable? That was what I was saying.

  • indianagardengirl
    6 days ago

    I can help, Kath. This is Solidago rugosa ‘Fireworks’

  • Kathsgrdn
    6 days ago

    Kentucky's state flower is the goldenrod. I have no pictures.

  • phoggie
    6 days ago

    Kansas Sunflower!


  • ravencajun Zone 8b TX
    6 days ago

    Louisiana is the beautiful grand Magnolia. I love Magnolias.

    Here in the Houston area we have some really beautiful displays of Azeleas. My neighborhood has a lot of them. I have my share in my yard.

  • blfenton
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    The Indian Blanket reminds me of the Gerber Daisy but it turns out it is part of the Sunflower family.

    I have a huge Camellia which I planted about 20 years ago. The flowers on it this year were gorgeous. We had a warm and dry April which really helped.

    I used to grow Peonies but I got tired of them needing to be caged. One of my neighbours has several beautiful specimens and everytime there is a threat of rain he puts up golf umbrellas over them for protection. I was thrilled when several years ago I discovered the existence of patio-sized peonies for containers. They're smaller than usual and so don't have the issue of needing to be caged.

    The dogwoods in our area put on quite a show this year. During the mid-70's a leaf blight destroyed many dogwoods and they were protected by law for several decades. The Pacific dogwood is being better cared for by gardeners and owners with new protocols.

    I don't grow poppies because they can become invasive to neighbouring properties. But they are a pretty addition to gardens.

    As you can see, many, if not all, of those exceptional flowers are grown north of the border.

  • patriciae_gw
    6 days ago

    I was surprised to see Peony as Indiana's flower because I tend to think of state flowers as more or less native or at least naturalized so I looked it up wondering do we have any native peony (a particular favorite of mine by the way) and we do! Both west coast though. I had no idea. Looking up state flowers there are states with Hybrid Teas as their state flower. Who knew. It does seem that often states that have introduced ornamentals as state flowers often have a state wild flower-like Alabama has Camelia and Oak Leaf Hydrangea as the wild one. Both beautiful. Of course we do have wild Rhodies here. Not as floriferous as the yard plants but so beautiful. I like the Rhodies because they make good shrubs even when not in bloom.

  • dedtired
    6 days ago

    Yes, Pennsylvania is the Mountain Laurel which makes sense because they really flourish in our woods. I used to have one but it got old and leggy so now it’s gone. Very similar time rhododendron .

  • nickel_kg
    6 days ago

    (pudgeder, lol -- took me a minute!)

  • pudgeder
    6 days ago

    Personally, I think they're all exceptional.

  • nickel_kg
    6 days ago

    Elmer, you're equating 'blessed' and 'exceptional', is that the way you've heard the term used? My experience has been different. Many blessings freely given, only rare or limited quantity things would be "exceptions", "exceptional."

    Maire-cate, I've heard that our North American trees are more varied than most because during the last Ice Age, our flora were able to retreat south without major geographical barriers. Maybe that's only true for comparing NA to Europe (in which the Mediterranean Sea was a major barrier), I'm not an expert. But it's interesting that so much of our land was in such a different climate as recently as 10 to 15 thousand years ago. It gives me hope for the long term.

  • Fun2BHere
    6 days ago

    Thanks for the pictures of poppies, @DawnInCal. You know, I don't think I've ever come across them in the wild. I often see Icelandic poppies planted on commercial sites, but not the California poppy.

  • maire_cate
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Well Elmer - I think that might just depend on your point of view. Our country is one of the largest so that allows for quite a difference in climate and geography. So I consider that we are blessed in having such a variety of flora.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    " So many pretty flowers, our nation is blessed. "

    Hmmm. Other nations also have flowers, I'm not sure there's anything exceptional here.

  • murraysmom Zone 6a OH
    6 days ago

    Ohio is the scarlet carnation. I don't have any pictures of that. In fact, I have never been able to find carnation plants at my local nurseries. There is a dianthus that looks like a carnation but that's about as close as I've come.

    The rhododendrons are spectacular! I have a friend that moved to Washington last fall and she has the most beautiful red in the yard of the house she is renting. It is gorgeous.

  • nickel_kg
    7 days ago

    ophoenix, I was lucky enough to vacation in/near Seattle a couple springs ago. Amazing -- what would be a jaw dropping gorgeous specimen of rhodie here (Virginia), was a ho-hum commonplace there. Good thing DH was driving, not me!

    So many pretty flowers, our nation is blessed.

    Here is a flowering dogwood, a flower shared by several states. Not my picture, for some reason I haven't photographed a dogwood myself. What an oversight! But this photo presents the dogwood in the way I love them best:


  • nicole___
    7 days ago

    Colorado = Columbine

  • maire_cate
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    New Jersey - common meadow violet

  • Marilyn_Sue
    7 days ago

    Indiana now has the peony as it's state flower, it changes from time to time! We have a state insect, the fire fly and a state pie, Sugar Cream Pie.

  • indianagardengirl
    7 days ago

    Peony for me. This one is Do Tell:

  • OutsidePlaying
    7 days ago

    Alabama’s State flower is the camellia. It’s a beautiful evergreen shrub that blooms in early spring. This isn’t my photo.



  • DawnInCal
    7 days ago

    I'll post some California poppies for you, Fun2BHere. I just took these a couple of weeks ago.


    These were taken a couple of years ago:



    Beautiful flowers, everyone!


  • Fun2BHere
    7 days ago

    California poppy. I don't have any pictures of it blooming.

  • pudgeder
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    The Rhodies are just gorgeous!


    Originally it was Mistletoe.

    In 1986, I believe, they adopted the Indian Blanket as the State of Oklahoma Flower.



  • marilyn_c
    7 days ago

    Those are beautiful! Our state flower is the blue bonnet.

  • blfenton
    7 days ago

    I'm just north of you and our provincial flower/tree is the Pacific Dogwood which just finished flowering.

    Our rhodos are about to burst out. We have two red ones that are side by side and if we get enough sun and the spring downpours stay away we wind up with a huge wall of red rhodo blooms which is truly spectacular. Lots of rhodos where I live

  • ophoenix
    7 days ago

    Here are a few more - we are located just north of Seattle, WA. Zone 7B- 8




    Please show some of your state flowers in bloom.