sd2102

James Galway for 6 ft fence

sd2102 (8b PNW)
last month

I'm thinking of ordering James Galway to put in front of a fence next spring. I was planning train it on a trellis along a 6.5 ft wide x 6 ft tall fence.

The area gets good sunlight to part shade depending on which part of the fence you are looking at, so I am looking for a climber that will grow well in slightly less than ideal sun conditions. To get a sense of the light situation- I planted Princess Anne several feet off of that fence and it is doing great so far. But a couple of feet down the same fence, and the sun light conditions are definitely less ideal. The David Austin website recommended this plant for shadier areas so I thought it might work in this spot.

Does anyone have any experience growing James Galway in shadier conditions and if so how well has it done?

Also, would it eventually be too tall for this fence? I'm going to put up a trellis, but the fence is owned by my neighbors so I don't want it to get too overgrown. I don't mind doing some pruning to keep it maintained, but since the DA website says this can get up to 15 feet tall I'm wondering if I'm selecting the wrong climber for this spot. Or maybe since part of it will be in part shade it won't be as robust?

Also, how wide would a single plant get? Can I train it to cover most of the 6.5 feet wide of the fence or is that asking for too much? I'm new to growing roses so I'm trying to manage my expectations!

Thanks!

Comments (8)

  • dianela7bnorthal
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I am not familiar with how clematises perform in your zone, but just in case I wanted to let you know Clematis Warsaw Nike can bloom here with 3 hours of sun. I have an Iceberg rose growing on a wall that is shaded between the house and a tree except for 3 hours of morning sun. I also have a Warsaw Nike with her and they both do very well, of course Icerberg needs regular spraying to keep her foliage. If you are willing to spray her she will perform well in a shady spot.

    Here she is own root and 2 years old. The clematis got eaten by a rabbit early in the year so she is growing back again. Anyway if you like the clematis you can add one to your rose and maybe it will add more color to your shady spot.

    clems known to bloom in less sun:

    warsaw Nike

    silver moon

    claire de lune





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  • dianela7bnorthal
    last month

    sd welcome to the forum. I am sorry if somehow I am missing seeing your zone, but In order to help you we need a bit more of info. A rose that is 12 feet in zone 8 could well be 2 feet tall in zone 5. Where are you located? US gardening zone and relative state area. When you say less than ideal light do you mean 5 hours or 3? A rose could do well in California with 3-4 hours of morning sun and be terrible somewhere leas hot. Looking forward to helping you out. There are many members here gardening all over the country and Austins are very popular so I am sure there will be someone here who can provide you with a good answer.

  • sd2102 (8b PNW)
    Original Author
    last month

    Yes that would be helpful! I’m in 8b- the PNW. I thought it was included with my name so I’ll check that setting.

  • dianela7bnorthal
    last month

    Thank you sd, I can see it now around your name. This site sometimes does weird things like that. We have several members closer to your area that I hope will chime in and give you their opinions. I am in the humid south. In your relatively mild zone I think James Galway will definitely grow big enough to cover the area you need. I planted one this spring with only morning sun and it is already 2 feet tall (Grafted) from David Austin. I have not sprayed it and it is completely clean of any fungal disease so far which probably means it is very healthy for an Austin. Here any Austin that can get 4 hours of sun does well with blooming so hopefully your plant will at least get that much sun.

  • dianela7bnorthal
    last month

    Sorry I couldn’t edit my post. If the rose starts growing taller than your fence all you need to do is bend the canes horizontally which will make it give you even more blooms. This should help you accommodate a rose on the 12 feet range or so.

  • sd2102 (8b PNW)
    Original Author
    last month

    Thank you- that is really helpful.

    I'm been trying to think about how much sun that area gets and I think this climber will get anywhere from 3-6 hours of afternoon sun depending where on the fence I place it. I'll try to be more observant this summer so I can figure out the optimum spot. I'm hoping I can cover the part of the fence the window looks out onto, but it's the shadier spot so we'll see how that goes. I'd even be happy if that part of the rose had primarily leaves (with more flowers towards the sunnier side). Leaves would be an improvement over the wood fence.

  • sd2102 (8b PNW)
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Those are beautiful! I did go down a clematis rabbit hole a couple of days ago when I realized I might be expecting too much for a rose bush in that area.

    But I think that they grow entirely too large for my purposes here in the PNW. I just have a 6.5 ft by 6 ft fence I need to cover. My house runs perpendicular to two other houses so it's at the intersection of two fences from both houses and I don't want anything that I can't keep pruned down to my side of the fence. All the shade tolerant clematis I read about seem to grow monstrously large. I'd love to hear if anyone thinks differently though.

    For now my plan might be to shift the climbing rose bush a foot or two down in the other direction where it's sunnier. I won't be able to see it from my window but visitors to our house will see it. And then to cover the part of the fence I can see through the window with the evergreen star jasmine. I'm not sure how many flowers I would get due to the partial shade conditions, but it seems like it's easier to keep pruned down. I'm going to have the same star jasmine vine in another part of my yard that does get more sunlight so it could be an interesting experiment.

    I'm still thinking this through though. And I have time since I don't plan on planting this area until next February/March.

  • dianela7bnorthal
    last month

    Sounds like you have a good plan. Since you have time keep an eye on the sun and if you get anything like 4 hours of sun in the area you can see go for it. Roses are tougher than they look and you naught be surprised with beautiful blooms you can enjoy from your window. Good luck! Hope to see your results in the future.

    sd2102 (8b PNW) thanked dianela7bnorthal
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