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Curled leaves on a Sans are Thirst, right?

KarenS, NYC
29 days ago
last modified: 29 days ago

I try to water this plant from to time to time (maybe every 10 days or so), but it doesn't seem to make any difference, the center leaf just doesn't uncurl.


I had cut off the floppy leaf as it was annoying me.


Maybe it knows I don't care for its yellow stripe, I probably shouldn't have even bought it. I was trying to like it, really I was.

Anybody got any idea pls?

It's hot here now, I want to water it every week, but am afraid to overwater it. Can't find a balance, wondering if I should just unpot it to check its roots.

Comments (26)

  • woodnative
    28 days ago

    I find when there is good light temps are high you almost can't overwater them (quite the opposite in the dark, cool winter).... they seem to thrive on the extra water as long as there is high temps and light. I am guessing that is how the commercial producers can mass produce notoriously difficult Sans like 'Golden Hahni' in almost pure peat. It is probably very warm and bright where they are being grown for wholesale.

    KarenS, NYC thanked woodnative
  • socks
    28 days ago

    How about repot and transitions to full or almost full sun? Is that a nice fast draining mix? The plant is nice.

  • Violet Beauregard
    27 days ago
    last modified: 27 days ago

    To expand on what Socks is saying, Sansevieria are almost like succulents actually, they store a good deal of water in their thick leaves. So its not a good idea to water so frequently. The curing leaf may be a sign of over watering. If you continue with that water schedule, the other leaves might just do the same thing. I'd cut back to watering only every 2-3 weeks depending on its environment. How much light is it getting? The more light it is in, and if its overly warm in the room, the faster photosynthesis, and faster the soil dries. If you are keeping it in low light, the soil is probably staying wet for too long. That is why the need for well-draining soil is important. And you can make it that way by amending it with combinations of chunky stuff like perlite, horticultural charcoal, pumice, or small bark chips. This also helps allow better oxygen flow to the roots. Its not too late, they are pretty resilient so its ok to repot it with better soil.

    edit: Oh and if you change the soil, don't water it right away, I'd give it about two weeks. Hope this helps!

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    26 days ago
    last modified: 26 days ago

    Socks & Violet,

    Thanks for trying, but I'm not new to Sans., have grown them for over 20 yrs. & even I've given talks on them.

    FYI Violet, Sans aren't 'almost like' succulents, they ARE succulents, even tho' some excel in tropics like India & Brazil, where I grew up.

    But I've always avoided the yellow stripe as I don't like them. In this pic, it's the same one on the far right before that leaf went floppy & then I cut it off.



    I've rebuilt my collection of many different kinds, tho' few have formal IDs anymore.



    Sorry for the blur on this one,



    I'm someone who has killed more Sans from underwatering rather than overwatering. I've never seen a curled leaf from over, so I'm thinking it's underwatered.

    As you can see even blurred, my mixes are quite fast draining. And these plants get a lot of bright light, just a few feet away from unobstructed west windows.

    I was hoping to hear from some of our Senior Sans growers here who know me like Woodnative (thanks Chris) & Stush.

    I may unpot it to check the roots in the next couple of days. The mix is what it came in from fellow grower, not a store.

  • Basia K
    26 days ago

    I think that you have nothing to wait for - dig it out, check the roots and move to a different substrate, whatever works best for you. I have problems with underwatering too (incredible as it may sound in case of succulent plants) and have lately almost destroyed my 'Jade' in this way. Loss of turgor, leaves hanging down etc. I have unpotted it, removed all dried-up roots, several leaves and stuck it into a pot filled with fine grit (2 mm diameter). And I water it from below :) Seems to work, turgor is back and plant looks fine again. However, the same procedure does not seem to work with 'Silver Blue' sansevieria (also dehydrated!). Replanted several weeks ago and no sign of improvement as yet. Perhaps this is due to different leaf structure. I think that S.trifasciata cultivar with thinner leaves might respond faster.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    26 days ago
    last modified: 26 days ago

    Hi Basia,

    Took me a minute when you spoke of losing your 'Jade', to realize that you meant a Hahnii Jade, been there, done that :>(

    Thanks abt this one, I turned it out today, found very few roots, have a look.



    Oops, sorry for the blur.



    Here's the mix it was in, had a lot of fine stuff which I sifted out.


    But then decided to use my own, porous C&S ish mix w/ Pumice instead.

    So I potted it slightly larger to better fit that root, will wait a couple of days & then water it, maybe deeply.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    26 days ago
    last modified: 26 days ago

    Hi Al,

    Yes, thanks, I did know that as suspected. That's what I've been doing which hasn't been working. That's why I posted asking for help.

    But if you're suggesting it's just its juvenile stage, then I'll try to just water a bit more often & be patient. Sigh ... OK, thanks.

  • Basia K
    24 days ago

    Do try watering it not from above, but from below. It is good practice - roots start out in search of the water and well, extra effort seems to do them good. If you water from above, then it is like a gift from heaven and roots just get lazy :)


  • Basia K
    24 days ago
    last modified: 24 days ago

    Ever seen a willow tree roots going into a water pipe? There is your answer. I don't "reason" - my opinion is based upon personal practice and experience, that's all.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    24 days ago
    last modified: 22 days ago

    May I pls point out that this discussion btwn Basia & Al isn't remotely helpful to my post or original question?

    I would have appreciated an answer beyond treat it like a succulent.

    Are you both agreeing that I should bottom water it? Pls note that's a YES or NO question.

    ETA: Al (Tapla) has since pulled his several comments from here after I pointed out they were not all helpful.

  • fsruss68
    23 days ago

    I had a somewhat similar issue with a different variety of trifasciata. It was a large plant with tall leaves like yours. One had a developed a small bend/curl in the leaf. It was an older leaf. Started with just one, then later on others started bending and looking “wilty”. Thought they needed more water—-wrong! I ended up digging them out of their pot and found several rhizome portions had turned mushy from root rot. I’ve had the plant for maybe 5-6 years at that point (had it from a baby) and was also more likely to underwater. Anyways—it was obvious which ones had root rot. Tried to save the remaining. The saved ones needed to dry out a bit first....as adding even more water doesn’t help. Saved one grouping-but one was the original with a weird bend and curl to its shape. It has continued to live (going on several years later now)—just looking weird. Later learned that the leaves could experience damage or trauma that could result in a bend. My large sans (I think it was a moonglow) went from 12 leaves down to 4. The section that lived had rhizome/roots that looked almost exactly like yours in the picture. If you got it from someone else, other parts of the plant may have been damaged-causing it stress. The scar marks on the leaves really don’t look like it’s young. It looks older. Whichever medium you use-make sure the roots get oxygen to fully develop (no soggy soil/medium—WHICHEVER way you water it). For my plant-it was a SLOW recovery (almost 2 years). I kept the funky bent leaf with the other 3 until the plant was healthy enough to start growing its own pups and a healthier root system, then I also cut it off and tried to propagate with it-but it was too old. This doesn’t directly answer your question-but I hope you find it helpful.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    23 days ago
    last modified: 23 days ago

    Thx for trying, but at first read, no, can't say I do.

    I will go back read it again later, after I copy paste it elsewhere to add some paragraph breaks. (Maybe it's 'cause I was a word processor for many yrs., but blocks of text that long w/out any paragraph breaks are just too hard to read.)

    Thx again for wanting to help; I looked again & while interesting, I don't see anything I can distill from that.

    So Al, your response was to pull your comments entirely?

    That too isn't especially helpful; given all the yrs. you've seen me around here, don't you think I deserve a bit more or better than that? Disappointing.

    Basia,

    I will try bottom watering it in the next couple of days, thx.

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    17 days ago

    If the plant doesn't get water, the leaves will wilt and flop over. Now some will say "But I do water it regularly". Still, rotted roots doesn't pick up water. Over watered sans show the same signs as under watered sans do.

    Karen, Maybe it's not any of those issues above. Maybe just old age or not optimal growing conditions that we can't achieve in our houses. Knowing your soil mix, I would say the roots should be getting enough air as well.

    No helping much but just don't know.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    17 days ago

    Hi Stush,

    Well, no harm in thinking out loud, right?

    So I watered it yesterday, was almost a week later. I'll see what happens & post updates if I've got anything to show.

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    17 days ago

    Thanks Karen.


    Basia K, Roots has the uncanny ability to seek out water by humidly or slight capillary action of water in soil mixes. Like you said, if watered from above then the soil is saturated and it has way too much water it needs so no need to "Seek out Water". Water from below then it does able to seek it out by the increase of humidly in the tiny air pockets in the soil.


    Tapla, No disrespect. You have proven yourself here many times. Problems with excess soil minerals and salts still need to dump excess water from tray after (I don't know but say 10 minuets). Just thinking our loud.

  • KarenS, NYC
    Original Author
    3 days ago
    last modified: 3 days ago

    An unfortunate update: it bit the dust. It had some wobble in its base where the 2 leaves came from, didn't bode well.

    When I saw one of the leaves flop over again, I pulled the plant out of the mix & saw the base was rotted. Bummer.

    I've cut up the good part of the leaves & will try to propagate. I suspect it was already damaged when it came to me.

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    3 days ago

    Don't feel too bad on this Karen. I have lost similar sans and refused replacement knowing the same fate is waiting for them. It was San. guineensis variegata which is now hyacinthoides variegata. Looks just like yours. There is a new one going around that is much hardier and looks almost the same called Sans. aubrytiana (Sayuri) 'Yellow Stone'. I have been having much better luck with. Same with Sans. hyacinthoides (guineensis) Siam Silver which I gave you. Much harder to grow than Sans. aubrytiana (Jaboa) 'Lauren' which is similar looking. If you come across any of these I think you will be much pleased.

  • Ellen Bshaw
    2 days ago

    I am thinking about getting the Sayuri Sans. I saw this sans in a nursery awhile ago and thought why are some of the leaves bending? It was pricey so I didn’t want to pay for what I thought was a defect plant. Upon researching the plant it appears that this is just what the plant does. Do you have one and do the leaves bend? Can you post a pic of it? Ellen

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    2 days ago

    A lot of my taller sans leaves droop at times. I use tomato cages to prop them up and some times they stay or some times they don't. No an issue with me. Just one you could use a stick and tie it to.




    Last two are Sansevieria aubrytiana (Jaboa) 'Lauren' and Sansevieria aubrytiana (Sayuri) 'Yellow Stone'. Yellow Stone is a sport of Sayuri. I could easily get them confused if I didn't have name tags. Older leaves get sun bleached to more white. If I kept them inside, they would be more perfect but little flaws don't brother me as well.


    To Karen, These are the plants I was talking about for a replacement for Siam Silver.

  • Basia K
    yesterday

    There seems to be something the matter with leaf margins on 'Yellow Stone' - is it sunburn or rust? (my 'Siam Silver' got rust, so I am sensitive to the issue).


  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    yesterday

    Outside they get more abuse from hot sun and windy storms. Overall, better to leave them out for the summer. Highly variegated plants get more beat up with hot summer sun and wind.

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    yesterday
    last modified: yesterday

    Maybe I shouldn't comment since I have only more common sans like Moonshine and cylindrica. I also have Jade dwarf. I have lost couple of Jade dwarfs after dividing it. I also killed Gold. Plants I lost got very 'flaccid' so I assumed I was underwatering. More water didn't help. I didn't try bottom watering - maybe it would helped?

    Plants I have are in quite gritty mix, and all are watered from above. Jade dwarf looks much better since I put it outside (dappled shade). I believe it is getting bit more water comparing to my watering, since it gets rained on sometimes. Cylindrica is growing quite well and has been divided, and so is Moonshine. I have 3 large pots of this one, which were all pups/offsets separated from original 1 pot I got about 6yrs ago. I just repotted and divided 4th pot that was breaking - here is the thread: REPOTTING SANS. MOONSHINE. There is a photo of the mix I use.

    Are these much easier to grow?

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    yesterday

    Rina,

    No, Sans. trifasciata is maybe the easiest one to grow for me. Any variegated plant is harder than an all green one. The hahnii group is plants stuck in a juvenile stage which makes them weaker.


    Your soil mix is dependent on how you water or take care of your plants. I used to use a more gritty mix and had some success and more loses. I switched to my own well composted soil with great success. Some plants I add some or a lot of perlite. Aloes and Jades and Haworthia I use more grit and perlite.


    What I need to know is why do some people find it necessary to divide up their plants. They grow way much better together and unless you promised some out, why? Every plant I have that pup out and I leave them together does very well for me.

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    yesterday

    Stush

    Thanks. I do not have typical green trifasciata - I like them, but they grow very tall and in big colonies, and space is at premium...But I often get a plant not knowing it will grow vigorously and end up dividing it more often.

    And I also like clumps of plants. More often than not, I divide only if someone wants a plant. Otherwise, if they are just too big for the average-sized pots- like Aloe rauhii which had well over 20 pups. I divided it about 3yrs ago, and every single pup grew many pups. So I divided them again and ended up with more than 100! Thankfully, someone was looking for plants to be given as a wedding favours, so I was able to get rid of them. I divide Sans in case they are breaking pots (like the Moonshine I linked to).

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    22 hours ago

    KarenS got logged out of Houzz & is Locked Out. Till they correct the problem.

  • Stush2049 Pitts. PA, zone 6
    8 hours ago

    Rina, I fully understand. I split up Aloe and Agave so the main plant continues to improve with age and not get messy looking. Sans are best in groups as stated. Every year I remove all the pups off my S. futura Asahi due to so many people wanting one. It pups about 6 every year and the main plant is starting to look bad now. Luckily it doesn't bloom which will stop it's growth cycle and cause the end of the main plant.