webuser_932599409

Seeking solution for weed & erosion control

Space Seed
last month

Pictured here is the terminus of my property at the rear; a solemn, ugly strip of depleted powdery clay approximately 40 feet long at the curb, and just for giggles, measuring an average of 44% gradient. An overlooked, unwanted piece of the bundle of joy that is my home, this area could not be more useless to me if it tried: it takes a quick drive or 10 minute walk to reach and is only visible from the backyard if one walks up to the retaining wall above. Yet, it is my responsibility to maintain it and keep it clear of the seasonal onslaughts of aggressive weeds and fast growing trees. The barren land you see here represents many hours of work, and many cubic yards of waste. Besides being a fire hazard and an eyesore when neglected, it is an invitation to the city whenever they get revenue hungry to issue a citation. I am quite over it. I want to cover this land with something that stops the weeds without allowing erosion. I'm leaning towards tacking down strips of landscape fabric and covering with mulch, bark or gravel. The challenge here is the steep gradient. If anyone has tips on making that idea work, or has a completely different idea, I am all ears. Thank you in advance!

Comments (6)

  • Ash
    last month
    last modified: last month

    My neighbor had a similar issue, and covered their 60% incline with a Geogrid type landscape product. They just filled theirs in with fine gravel for low maintenance. Cell-Tek Slopegrid. Just google "Gravel on an incline", and you will see many examples.

  • PRO
    Yardvaark
    last month

    Nature's answer is to cover it with any kind of plant material, but probably the most aggressive and invasive type, as that's what's trying to spread the most. To follow the same general principal in a more civilized kind of way, is to cover the area with some kind of groundcover. The difference is that you'll have to help the civilized plants along, watering them through the establishment period according to the weather patterns. What's coming to mind as a possibility, if it grows there, is ordinary fountain grass, Pennisetum setaceum. It gets about 3' tall with an equal spread, is easy to grow and reseeds itself, which helps it to fill in any bare spots that might appear. It's quite nice looking for a long period of time in a warm climate.

  • arcy_gw
    last month

    Pachysandra works for me in similar situations. No pampering, no maintenance. Looks great 90% of the time. Early spring coming out from under the snow..nothing looks great.

  • Christopher C Nc
    last month

    The simplest solution is just to weed whack whatever comes up once a month in what I would take to be the rainy season from the pictures. That might take all of ten minutes. Groundcovers and landscape fabric with any kind of mulch will still need weeding and maintenance in the growing season to avoid the revenue collectors. Because it is inaccessible from the property and requires the problematic effort of a walk or drive, pay somebody to do it for you.

  • apple_pie_order
    last month

    Have you considered moving the wall to enclose the area as part of your yard? The area would be more accessible and possibly more useful.

  • PRO
    Yardvaark
    last month

    If one has allowed a weed problem, it takes a while to get rid of it. But if one plants and mulches fairly heavily (two settled inches is enough) and polices it from returning weeds on a regular schedule while the groundcover plants are growing in, eventually the weeds will be few and far between and there will be a lovely covering of nice looking plants. Preen, on a schedule, helps.

    At the first couple of years of a new installation, regularly returning annual weeds come with the seasonal changes. But if weeding is kept up with, eventually these stop or slow to nearly nothing. That's how everywhere new, weed-free landscapes are permitted to exist.

Sponsored
Loudoun County Landscape & Design Swimming Pool & Patio Construction